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    (Original post by Outrageous)
    Hardly, it only affirmed the choice.

    BaztheMoney,

    Well I pretty much know that its not your usual 9-5 job and on average the hours you work are longer and yes freetime becomes a scarce ressource. Thats just how it is.

    Your comment on glorified secretaries doesn't sound too good. Are you saying women are discriminated against? I read recently an article on female climbing the career ladder and one of them was a trader at 22. Then again she did hold a double degree or such. Obviously raising having kids and family will suffer. I am not sure if your comment was in relation to that problem.

    And you never did tell what you instead opted for.
    No one is discrimminated against, but the work isn't as glam as the tales you here about - not everyone's a trader, most are just normal works doing normal things, not very exciting 95% of the time.

    I'm doing a Mphil, probable followed by a PhD, and then into academia, whatever that may be. I'll probable become a university lecturer or something.
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    (Original post by BazTheMoney)
    I'm doing a Mphil, probable followed by a PhD, and then into academia, whatever that may be. I'll probable become a university lecturer or something.
    Lucky *******. I wish I had enough confidence to go into academia.
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    Degree class and job prospects aren't that strongly correlated you know, there's a lot of other factors to consider. Someone I know just got a job at Deloitte, one of the most competitive places to get in, despite having a low 3rd in his first yr exams - this was more than made up by being Union Treasurer and having some good work experience. On the other hand there's people with 1sts struggling to get jobs since they have nothing else to show for themselves.
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    (Original post by H&E)
    It seems to me your primary purpose in life is to make lots of money, at all costs. If that is so, IB is indeed a very good option, and good luck to you in pursuing it. However, describing other career choices as "settling for second best" and/or ones where one cannot be satisfied even if one is very successful seems to be extraordinarily dismissive. IB's reject many talented applicants; but I believe far more talented people rejected IB's.
    You know what, assume away because that is what do best evidently. If I was going for the money, IB would not be my main choice. There are other careers I am sure you can earn plenty in - Law being one. However just like everybody who does law does not do it for the money, the same applies to people who want to do IB that they don't all do it for the money. Not everybody will be getting 0,6million in a bonus and not everybody will living the high life. Its about choices made based on interest and passion something you won't and don't want to grasp.

    Obviously if your first choice does not come through you are settling for a second best. You could be happy with that or not. 50/50 and it usually entails that you actually know what your second choice is. Obviously banking has many fields and consultancy are options too once you have experience. But getting your foot inside the business is the main problem and not the money as long as you have a roof over your head and food on your table.

    You seem to have some prejudice to say the least against IB. Maybe you should not generalize to begin with. You don't like it cool. But some do like it and it is popular for other reasons than money. And not everybody cooks up a choice just like that. For some it took mistakes and wasted time before they knew what they wanted. So do not assume on everybodys behalf.
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    (Original post by Jools)
    Degree class and job prospects aren't that strongly correlated you know, there's a lot of other factors to consider. Someone I know just got a job at Deloitte, one of the most competitive places to get in, despite having a low 3rd in his first yr exams - this was more than made up by being Union Treasurer and having some good work experience. On the other hand there's people with 1sts struggling to get jobs since they have nothing else to show for themselves.
    Deloitte is a gargantuan company. They take over 600 graduates a year, and have a full time recruiting team. They are therefore able to look much more closely at candidates with very exceptional circumstances. Few other companies can.
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    (Original post by BazTheMoney)
    No one is discrimminated against, but the work isn't as glam as the tales you here about - not everyone's a trader, most are just normal works doing normal things, not very exciting 95% of the time.

    I'm doing a Mphil, probable followed by a PhD, and then into academia, whatever that may be. I'll probable become a university lecturer or something.
    ... at Cambridge
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    Goodness, Baz! Sounds really interesting and cool. Does a PHD not take 3 years or something? Wish I had that kinda of stamina for studying. I think its excellent you want to become a teacher/lecturer although I swore against it at all costs. *L*
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    (Original post by Outrageous)
    Goodness, Baz! Sounds really interesting and cool. Does a PHD not take 3 years or something? Wish I had that kinda of stamina for studying. I think its excellent you want to become a teacher/lecturer although I swore against it at all costs. *L*
    I was under the impression it took 4 if you're really good. And for most people it'll take more. :confused:
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    Dear Jools,

    Exceptions are everywhere I guess
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    (Original post by Mysticmin)
    I was under the impression it took 4 if you're really good. And for most people it'll take more. :confused:
    3-3.5 years is the norm.
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    (Original post by Mysticmin)
    I was under the impression it took 4 if you're really good. And for most people it'll take more. :confused:
    It's 3 and a half (or four in certain subject areas)...but it's possible to do it quicker.

    I wouldn't call it studying though - researching is a long way from cramming for exams
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    (Original post by Pencil Queen)
    It's 3 and a half (or four in certain subject areas)...but it's possible to do it quicker.

    I wouldn't call it studying though - researching is a long way from cramming for exams
    Three and faster...so sort of like an undergrad then
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    (Original post by Outrageous)
    So do not assume on everybodys behalf.
    This is precisely the reason why I took issue with your posts: statements which said, generally, one could not be satisfied outside this sector, or that choosing a different job elsewhere involved settling for second best. Now that you have made clear that you recognise that this is solely a personal view which does not apply for others, I retract my objection. Though I do think you could have made it much clearer that this was your viewpoint at an earlier stage.
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    (Original post by Mysticmin)
    Three and faster...so sort of like an undergrad then
    Sort of - a very different sort of life though (no summer holidays for a start) and a very different sort of qualification (3 yrs researching a single topic is very different from 3 years studying all aspects of a subject)
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    (Original post by H&E)
    Deloitte is a gargantuan company. They take over 600 graduates a year, and have a full time recruiting team. They are therefore able to look much more closely at candidates with very exceptional circumstances. Few other companies can.
    For an A-Level student you have a ridiculous amount of knowledge. But my main point is that degree class is not as important as people here seem to think in determining job prospects, I'd say everything else (work experience, evidence of teamwork, organisational skills, leadership, communication, social skills etc) is perhaps more important than whether someone has a 2:1 or a 1st. Most of the Top 100 companies require a 2:1 as a minimum criteria to apply, but thereafter it's everything else outside academia which matters to stand out.
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    (Original post by Pencil Queen)
    Sort of - a very different sort of life though (no summer holidays for a start) and a very different sort of qualification (3 yrs researching a single topic is very different from 3 years studying all aspects of a subject)
    No summer holi - hmmph, so that's why it's 3 - 3.5 years.
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    (Original post by Outrageous)
    Dear Jools,
    Exceptions are everywhere I guess
    I'm not giving examples of rare anomalies, this is very common. Myself and others here are being successful in getting offers from top companies despite not exactly being the most academically successful, because other stuff matters more. Getting a top 1st in History doesn't necessarily mean you're going to be any good in the workplace.
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    (Original post by H&E)
    This is precisely the reason why I took issue with your posts: statements which said, generally, one could not be satisfied outside this sector, or that choosing a different job elsewhere involved settling for second best. Now that you have made clear that you recognise that this is solely a personal view which does not apply for others, I retract my objection. Though I do think you could have made it much clearer that this was your viewpoint at an earlier stage.
    For crying out loud, one more pip from you and you are buying us all drinks and the remaining discussion will take place over drinks.

    It's only you, who took it to mean something general and started overanalyzing it. Everybody else managed to reply just fine. The entire post was subjective, unless everybody feel the same as your truly, in which case I am hardly to blame. You underestimate the ability of people to read and judge for themselves. So enough already.
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    (Original post by Mysticmin)
    I was under the impression it took 4 if you're really good. And for most people it'll take more. :confused:
    The Mphil is 1 year and the PhD is probable 3. So 4 years in total.
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    (Original post by Jools)
    I'm not giving examples of rare anomalies, this is very common. Myself and others here are being successful in getting offers from top companies despite not exactly being the most academically successful, because other stuff matters more. Getting a top 1st in History doesn't necessarily mean you're going to be any good in the workplace.
    Really, Jools? Would you not think though that it depends on fields as well? I mean there will always be a need for certain professionals whereas otehr fields are just highly competitative?
 
 
 
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