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Am I at a disadvantage compared with other medicine applicants? watch

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    I've recently decided that I may want to study medicine at university
    However, I've heard that I may be at a disadvantage to other students due to the a-levels I am doing: chemistry, biology, psychology and philosophy
    Many of my teachers have said that universities look for students with at least 3 science/maths subjects

    I just want to know how much more difficult it is going to be for me to get onto a good medicine course. What are the good universities for studying medicine in the uk?

    Also is it true that I should be doing a lot of work experience this year to put on my application? If so, how much?

    Thanks
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    Your teachers are morons if they're advising against applying. You won't be at any disadvantage. Get stellar grades is your objective.
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    You have the most important ones, chemistry and biology so as long as you have top grades then you shouldn't be at any disadvantage.
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    Your teachers are mostly wrong. So long as you have Biology and Chemistry you won't be disadvantaged at the vast majority of universities. I know Cambridge require 3 sciences (so that's not an option for you unfortunately), and there may be a couple of others, but for the most part it won't be a problem.

    From what I know, there's not really an element of prestige when it comes to medicine courses. Obviously Oxford and Cambridge raise eyebrows, but outside of them, it doesn't matter where you study (your employer is ultimately the NHS, who don't care). So just pick the uni you'd most want to study at (though I'm sure actual medicine students may be able to shed more light on this).

    Yes you will be expected to have a fair bit of experience. Again, actual medicine students can tell you how much, but you'll definitely need some experience in a caring environment (hospital, care home, hospice, etc).
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    (Original post by arabella37)
    I've recently decided that I may want to study medicine at university
    However, I've heard that I may be at a disadvantage to other students due to the a-levels I am doing: chemistry, biology, psychology and philosophy
    Many of my teachers have said that universities look for students with at least 3 science/maths subjects

    I just want to know how much more difficult it is going to be for me to get onto a good medicine course. What are the good universities for studying medicine in the uk?

    Also is it true that I should be doing a lot of work experience this year to put on my application? If so, how much?

    Thanks
    Your teachers are more interested in the numbers game of getting the percentage of accepted applicants first time round higher each year. They are covering their backs.

    I know at least 10 people who never did biology at A level or maths.

    You will be fine
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    (Original post by High Stakes)
    Your teachers are morons if they're advising against applying. You won't be at any disadvantage. Get stellar grades is your objective.
    Haha okay thanks
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    (Original post by Lemur14)
    You have the most important ones, chemistry and biology so as long as you have top grades then you shouldn't be at any disadvantage.
    Ok thanks
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    (Original post by ChuckHades)
    Your teachers are mostly wrong. So long as you have Biology and Chemistry you won't be disadvantaged at the vast majority of universities. I know Cambridge require 3 sciences (so that's not an option for you unfortunately), and there may be a couple of others, but for the most part it won't be a problem.

    From what I know, there's not really an element of prestige when it comes to medicine courses. Obviously Oxford and Cambridge raise eyebrows, but outside of them, it doesn't matter where you study (your employer is ultimately the NHS, who don't care). So just pick the uni you'd most want to study at (though I'm sure actual medicine students may be able to shed more light on this).

    Yes you will be expected to have a fair bit of experience. Again, actual medicine students can tell you how much, but you'll definitely need some experience in a caring environment (hospital, care home, hospice, etc).
    Yeah most unis say they only require biology and chemistry but I just thought that maybe they had some secret preference for students with three sciences.
    I wasn't really thinking of going to cambridge or oxford anyway, I've heard they aren't even really favoured that much when it comes to medicine.
    Thanks for all your help
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    (Original post by Killuminati1989)
    Your teachers are more interested in the numbers game of getting the percentage of accepted applicants first time round higher each year. They are covering their backs.

    I know at least 10 people who never did biology at A level or maths.

    You will be fine
    Haha yeah I think you're right! That's reassuring to hear about the people you know, thank you
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    (Original post by arabella37)
    I've recently decided that I may want to study medicine at university
    However, I've heard that I may be at a disadvantage to other students due to the a-levels I am doing: chemistry, biology, psychology and philosophy
    Many of my teachers have said that universities look for students with at least 3 science/maths subjects
    You will be at no disadvantage anywhere other than Cambridge. Other students may well have three sciences but that doesn't put you at a disadvantage. At some medical schools (e.g. UCL), they actually prefer breadth and say so openly on their website.

    I just want to know how much more difficult it is going to be for me to get onto a good medicine course. What are the good universities for studying medicine in the uk?
    Very difficult. It's one of the most competitive courses there is. All medical schools have to be approved by the General Medical Council so they're all, by definition, good enough to be teaching medicine. They're all good. There's no such thing as a bad UK medical school save for the fact that you may take a personal dislike to the course as the teaching styles are quite varied.

    Also is it true that I should be doing a lot of work experience this year to put on my application? If so, how much?

    Thanks
    Realistically you'll need at least a week or two, although it's always quality, not quantity. If you can reflect well on what you've done, you're golden. The admissions tutors realise that not everybody has the opportunity to do expensive things like Gap Medics or lives near a hospital that will let them get some experience.
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    (Original post by Hydeman)
    You will be at no disadvantage anywhere other than Cambridge. Other students may well have three sciences but that doesn't put you at a disadvantage. At some medical schools (e.g. UCL), they actually prefer breadth and say so openly on their website.



    Very difficult. It's one of the most competitive courses there is. All medical schools have to be approved by the General Medical Council so they're all, by definition, good enough to be teaching medicine. They're all good. There's no such thing as a bad UK medical school save for the fact that you may take a personal dislike to the course as the teaching styles are quite varied.



    Realistically you'll need at least a week or two, although it's always quality, not quantity. If you can reflect well on what you've done, you're golden. The admissions tutors realise that not everybody has the opportunity to do expensive things like Gap Medics or lives near a hospital that will let them get some experience.
    UCL is actually where I want to go so that's great to hear!
    My teachers told me I'd need at least 3 - 4 work experience placements but I really don't have time to do that!! Do you reckon doing 2 separate placements during next summer holidays would be enough?
    Thanks for all your help
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    (Original post by arabella37)
    UCL is actually where I want to go so that's great to hear!
    My teachers told me I'd need at least 3 - 4 work experience placements but I really don't have time to do that!! Do you reckon doing 2 separate placements during next summer holidays would be enough?
    Thanks for all your help
    If you can say what you learned from them, then yes. There's no minimum number of hours/weeks you need to get for most medical schools. Try to get one hospital and one GP/pharmacy placement though, since they're quite different things. That way you can reflect on the differences between primary/community care and specialised care in hospitals.

    Your teachers seem to know very little about medical applications, to be honest. I would suggest contacting medical schools yourself rather than relying on your teachers if they regularly give you concrete statements like that -- the only thing you definitely need a certain amount of is A Level grades (i.e. it's unlikely you'll get in without being on track for AAA at least) and the rest is all variable depending on the school.
 
 
 
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