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    I am going to choose my A-levels in about a month time, therefore i need some advice. I want to do law in university, hopefully a Russel group university.I know that it is advised to do a essay type subject like English or History. To be honest i am not doing well in English. So, i decided to pick History, Math and Economics, i need advice for what to do for my fourth subject. i might decided to do a science subject. Please can you reply ASAP.
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    (Original post by ahmed3140)
    I am going to choose my A-levels in about a month time, therefore i need some advice. I want to do law in university, hopefully a Russel group university.I know that it is advised to do a essay type subject like English or History. To be honest i am not doing well in English. So, i decided to pick History, Math and Economics, i need advice for what to do for my fourth subject. i might decided to do a science subject. Please can you reply ASAP.
    I don't think there are many law courses that specify that certain A Levels are required although taking essay-based subjects will certainly help because of the essay-based nature of a lot of Law courses. As far as the fourth subject goes, you should do something you enjoy and can get a decent grade in. Don't take a science just for the sake of it or because you think it's harder and hence more respected because A Level science is pretty difficult for most humanities-leaning people in my experience. Besides, I'm pretty sure mathematics counts as a science as far as most university admissions are concerned.

    You may want to look at the specifications for the subjects you're looking to take and whether these will change next year -- this might be some help in making a decision.
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    (Original post by Hydeman)
    I don't think there are many law courses that specify that certain A Levels are required although taking essay-based subjects will certainly help because of the essay-based nature of a lot of Law courses. As far as the fourth subject goes, you should do something you enjoy and can get a decent grade in. Don't take a science just for the sake of it or because you think it's harder and hence more respected because A Level science is pretty difficult for most humanities-leaning people in my experience. Besides, I'm pretty sure mathematics counts as a science as far as most university admissions are concerned.

    You may want to look at the specifications for the subjects you're looking to take and whether these will change next year -- this might be some help in making a decision.
    Thanks for the quick and informative reply. i was also thinking about doing philosophy, do you anything about this subject? I only know a little. Or should i consider doing Further maths. Furthermore, i am about to take my mocks in about a month time. how much revision a day should i consider doing.
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    (Original post by ahmed3140)
    Thanks for the quick and informative reply. i was also thinking about doing philosophy, do you anything about this subject? I only know a little. Or should i consider doing Further maths. Furthermore, i am about to take my mocks in a bout a month time. how much revision a day should i consider doing.
    A friend of mine just got into Nottingham for law, she did philosophy and said it was brilliant prep.
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    (Original post by ahmed3140)
    Thanks for the quick and informative reply. i was also thinking about doing philosophy, do you anything about this subject? I only know a little. Or should i consider doing Further maths. Furthermore, am about to take my mocks in a bout a month time. how much revision a day should i consider doing.
    I knew people who took Philosophy and Ethics at A Level and I'm currently self-teaching myself A Level Further Mathematics. I don't know where your strengths lie but, on the whole, I'd wager the latter is quite a bit harder than the former. Further Mathematics is like all the stuff they had to take out of the regular Mathematics syllabus to reverse the declining numbers of people studying it at A Level so it's pretty difficult. :dontknow:

    Because there aren't any subject requirements and you're already taking two essay-based subjects, I'd say take something you'll find easy (provided it isn't General Studies or Critical Thinking because they're often not accepted by universities). Philosophy is very essay-based so you should consider whether you can cope with three essay-based A Levels. With Further Mathematics, you'd have to consider the risk that it might be too challenging for you -- GCSE-level mathematics isn't really a very good predictor because it's just basic numeracy and is designed as a qualification they want everyone to pass so the jump to A Level can often be huge.
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    (Original post by Hydeman)
    I knew people who took Philosophy and Ethics at A Level and I'm currently self-teaching myself A Level Further Mathematics. I don't know where your strengths lie but, on the whole, I'd wager the latter is quite a bit harder than the former. Further Mathematics is like all the stuff they had to take out of the regular Mathematics syllabus to reverse the declining numbers of people studying it at A Level so it's pretty difficult. :dontknow:

    Because there aren't any subject requirements and you're already taking two essay-based subjects, I'd say take something you'll find easy (provided it isn't General Studies or Critical Thinking because they're often not accepted by universities). Philosophy is very essay-based so you should consider whether you can cope with three essay-based A Levels. With Further Mathematics, you'd have to consider the risk that it might be too challenging for you -- GCSE-level mathematics isn't really a very good predictor because it's just basic numeracy and is designed as a qualification they want everyone to pass so the jump to A Level can often be huge.
    Thank you for your quick consistent reply's. So i think i'll do Maths, History, Economics and Philosophy A-levels. Regarding the GCSE mocks, how many hours of revision should i do. i have to start the mocks at the 7th December. i haven't done any serious revision yet.
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    (Original post by AlohaCharlotte)
    A friend of mine just got into Nottingham for law, she did philosophy and said it was brilliant prep.
    I'll defiantly take philosophy as a serious option. Thanks for the heads up. And, what a levels did your friend do to get into Nottingham.
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    (Original post by ahmed3140)
    Thank you for your quick consistent reply's. So i think i'll do Maths, History, Economics and Philosophy A-levels. Regarding the GCSE mocks, how many hours of revision should i do. i have to start the mocks at the 7th December. i haven't done any serious revision yet.
    It's more about studying effectively than studying a lot, although you will need to spend some time at it. Find a way of learning that suits you and measure your progress by doing past papers -- if your marks aren't moving or are declining, then your current method is probably not very good. Generally speaking, it's better to do a little revision every day than do a lot nearer to the exams. It's just less stress for you so I'd suggest maybe 1 - 2 hours each night and prioritise the subjects/topics you struggle with.

    If I'm honest, I didn't do that much revision for my GCSE mocks because I didn't care but you should treat it seriously to get some good exam practice.
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    (Original post by ahmed3140)
    I'll defiantly take philosophy as a serious option. Thanks for the heads up. And, what a levels did your friend do to get into Nottingham.
    She did geography, english and philosophy
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    I've heard about people getting into Law with subjects like maths and sciences as opposed to normal essay subjects, but it is really good to have History as this gives you the sort of skills you are looking for. If you go on Which? University, and search in 'Law' you can click on each university, and if you scroll right to the bottom of the page with statistics it will tell you the most common A Level subjects for people who have studied Law there. I do Philosophy A2, alongside History and English Literature, if you have any questions about these subjects feel free to ask!
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    (Original post by oswalds)
    I've heard about people getting into Law with subjects like maths and sciences as opposed to normal essay subjects, but it is really good to have History as this gives you the sort of skills you are looking for. If you go on Which? University, and search in 'Law' you can click on each university, and if you scroll right to the bottom of the page with statistics it will tell you the most common A Level subjects for people who have studied Law there. I do Philosophy A2, alongside History and English Literature, if you have any questions about these subjects feel free to ask!
    What did you achieve in your GCSE's? and any GCSE tips on revision.
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    (Original post by ahmed3140)
    What did you achieve in your GCSE's? and any GCSE tips on revision.
    I got 3 As, 4 Bs and 2 Cs in my GCSEs, which I was happy with, considering that I had undiagnosed dyslexia, but I know I had potential to do better. Looking back in hindsight, I should have tried harder to find what revision techniques helped me personally, and made sure I was using my revision time effectively in a way that helped me. I did this for my AS exams, and found that typing up my notes was the most effective way of revising for me, and I found that planning essays instead of writing them out completely was much less of a waste of time, as I already knew the technique at this time, so in my ASs I got AAAAB, which showed my techniques worked for me.

    What I've also found useful is visualization. When I'm revising or in an exam, I'll think about results day and my ideal grades, and this helps keep me motivated.
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    (Original post by oswalds)
    I got 3 As, 4 Bs and 2 Cs in my GCSEs, which I was happy with, considering that I had undiagnosed dyslexia, but I know I had potential to do better. Looking back in hindsight, I should have tried harder to find what revision techniques helped me personally, and made sure I was using my revision time effectively in a way that helped me. I did this for my AS exams, and found that typing up my notes was the most effective way of revising for me, and I found that planning essays instead of writing them out completely was much less of a waste of time, as I already knew the technique at this time, so in my ASs I got AAAAB, which showed my techniques worked for me.

    What I've also found useful is visualization. When I'm revising or in an exam, I'll think about results day and my ideal grades, and this helps keep me motivated.
    Visualisation I think is something we have in common. Furthermore, thank you for sharing the information of your GCSE results.
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    dont worry too much about mock revision, obviously you want to try and get a realistic interpretation of how youll do in the summer, but if its anything like my school ,we did another lot of mocks about march time when youll get a more relasitc view then. i tended to revise 2 subjects a day on the weekends, one in the morning one in the afternoon, and then on school nights just a bit of a subject. I probably did 2 hours a subject on a weekend. I worked mainly with colours and images. i would write up colourful cue cards with all the key notes and just keep going over them, id also make posters and stick then around the house, when it comes to the exam you can imagine where in the housse that information is and it helps me remember it better. Also interms of law, ive heard philosophy is good, there are a good few people in my psychology class that are wanting to do law too (one of our modules is cognition and law, he other is forensics, but that is probably as much relevance as the subject has to law) good luck with your mocks and future a levels
 
 
 
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