AnimeFreak101
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Hello to whoever is bothered to read this. I've just started A-levels and I moved from a state school to a grammar school which is very intimidating because of the difference in environment. Long story short, everyone seems to be used to the whole system and so organised as it is the beginning and I'm struggling to organize myself (not that I was really organised in the first place) but I study Maths, Chemistry, Biology and Psychology. Any advice on how to approach each subject in terms of revision and any advice you will give to someone aiming for at least AAAB in these subjects.

EDIT:
I forgot to add it's a bit different now that all my subjects apart from maths are linear
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emiloujess
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(Original post by AnimeFreak101)
Hello to whoever is bothered to read this. I've just started A-levels and I moved from a state school to a grammar school which is very intimidating because of the difference in environment. Long story short, everyone seems to be used to the whole system and so organised as it is the beginning and I'm struggling to organize myself (not that I was really organised in the first place) but I study Maths, Chemistry, Biology and Psychology. Any advice on how to approach each subject in terms of revision and any advice you will give to someone aiming for at least AAAB in these subjects
Which exam board for Psychology?
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AnimeFreak101
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AQA
(Original post by emiloujess)
Which exam board for Psychology?
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Desi.Biochemist96
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Hey there, I did Maths Bio and chem for A levels. (not sure how psychology works) For maths, just practise past papers if you don't understand something go to examsolutions.net pretty good website. I like Maths because all you have to do is understand a certain method and just basically apply it to other similar questions.
I used cgp's revision guide and mark schemes to familiarise with the exam technique, key words you need to use and all. Use mark schemes to make your notes. That's what I did. Same for chemistry, except I used chemrevise.org for notes. It's all about exam technique once you learn the material. So yeah basically practise for maths, mark schemes for bio and chem.

Hope that helped. Well it worked for me anyway...
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emiloujess
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(Original post by AnimeFreak101)
AQA
Ohh right. OK I can't help much I'm afraid because I only did AS AQA 2 years ago before having to repeat year 12. However I found that mind maps helped, especially for the research methods section. I also did cue cards for the studies/theories. Also, doing past papers helps... A LOT.
Start making revision resources as early as you can so when exams come nearer you can use them to learn from.

Good Luck!
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AnimeFreak101
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:bump:
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Professor L
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(Original post by AnimeFreak101)
Hello to whoever is bothered to read this. I've just started A-levels and I moved from a state school to a grammar school which is very intimidating because of the difference in environment. Long story short, everyone seems to be used to the whole system and so organised as it is the beginning and I'm struggling to organize myself (not that I was really organised in the first place) but I study Maths, Chemistry, Biology and Psychology. Any advice on how to approach each subject in terms of revision and any advice you will give to someone aiming for at least AAAB in these subjects.

EDIT:
I forgot to add it's a bit different now that all my subjects apart from maths is linear
Hi! I studied all four subjects!

CGP's student books (not their revision guides, their version of textbooks) were my savior for AS and I still use them now for A2. The layout and the FONT are amazing! I used them for all my subjects except psychology as they didn't have one for OCR, but they had one for AQA though.

I know they've made new ones for the linear A Levels, classed as Y1 and Y2, and you can probably get one for all your subjects! But since you're the first year doing the linear instead of modular, they might not be on eBay for cheap prices (that's where I got mine!)

I just made sure I remembered everything in the books for the exams as well as doing some past paper questions throughout the year to make sure I'm prepared for any surprises that might pop up in the exams.

I would identify your strongest subjects and read ahead on those first as much as you can, then future lessons would be more on consolidating your learning rather than learning something new. I did/am doing this for chemistry and maths (I want to do chemistry at university ) and I ended up getting higher UMS in biology, IDEK.

Hopefully this helps!

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AnimeFreak101
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(Original post by Kamara7)
Hi! I studied all four subjects!

CGP's student books (not their revision guides, their version of textbooks) were my savior for AS and I still use them now for A2. The layout and the FONT are amazing! I used them for all my subjects except psychology as they didn't have one for OCR, but they had one for AQA though.

I know they've made new ones for the linear A Levels, classed as Y1 and Y2, and you can probably get one for all your subjects! But since you're the first year doing the linear instead of modular, they might not be on eBay for cheap prices (that's where I got mine!)

I just made sure I remembered everything in the books for the exams as well as doing some past paper questions throughout the year to make sure I'm prepared for any surprises that might pop up in the exams.

I would identify your strongest subjects and read ahead on those first as much as you can, then future lessons would be more on consolidating your learning rather than learning something new. I did/am doing this for chemistry and maths (I want to do chemistry at university ) and I ended up getting higher UMS in biology, IDEK.

Hopefully this helps!

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It really does thank you! But the only thing is that the CGP books don't come out until next year! TT.TT So far I've made a progress tracker for Maths which is really useful as it means that no time is wasted. Still figuring out how to make one for biology, chem and psychology though as those ones are not as straight forward and predictable. But I'll try to make one before the next term drags on.
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chemman988
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Hi, I am re-doing my AS Chemistry OCR Controlled assessments, and I really need to do well.
Qual CA: • You will attempt to identify four unknown solutions; • You will investigate the effect of heat on three solid compounds.

What would I need to know/go over, in order to do well (i.e. precipitation reactions?) PEASE REPLY ASAP AS IT IS URGENT...
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Midgeymoo17
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(Original post by AnimeFreak101)
Hello to whoever is bothered to read this. I've just started A-levels and I moved from a state school to a grammar school which is very intimidating because of the difference in environment. Long story short, everyone seems to be used to the whole system and so organised as it is the beginning and I'm struggling to organize myself (not that I was really organised in the first place) but I study Maths, Chemistry, Biology and Psychology. Any advice on how to approach each subject in terms of revision and any advice you will give to someone aiming for at least AAAB in these subjects.

EDIT:
I forgot to add it's a bit different now that all my subjects apart from maths is linear
Look probably the biggest mistake people make in this transition is in the estimate of the amount of time they need to spend working outside the classroom.
For optimal grades you are probably looking at 4-6 hrs pers subject a week. Max total of about an additional 20hrs this is a lot. The first thing you should do is find this time in your week. Start by getting your school timetable out and filling any study periods. Just write in one of your subjects. Then work out what you need to add in the evenings to make your 20 hrs.

Personally I then find it helpful to mark for each planned session the rough task I will be doing- so that allows me to divide up my 6 hrs putting say in maths 2hrs for revision of a previous unit/ work, 2hrs for classwork consolidation and practice 2hrs for HW.

For maths can not stress enough the importance of past papers- however their is a catch- really do not do them till you are ready. Here you must get the balance right between not starting till you are ready and starting too late. I say this as if you start too early you will not be able to answer half the questions and just do really badly and then the paper is rather wasted. If you are taking 3 maths paper sat the end of this year, I recommend that realistically you can complete 2 per week and have access to the o 10 years for each paper=> you will need to start 3-4 months before your exams. People can do many more than this but if you spread it out like that it gives you a chance to consolidate weak parts between papers. So in conclusion I agree past papers are important but need to be used correctly and not in isolation.

Same really goes for chemistry and Biology. Make sure you do the papers but with right approach.

Can not comment really on psychology as I did not do it- the closest I can get is history. For me here what worked well was obtaining relevant introductory undergraduate level texts as they. unlike the A level textbook, presented arguments rather than facts. This tended to push me academically more to think critically as I struggle to argue unless there is something to argue against. Best way I could illustrate this is that I could not write a sentence on a piece of work so I asked someone else to do it but once it was on the page I could manipulate and change it so it said exactly what I wanted it to say.
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AnimeFreak101
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(Original post by Midgeymoo17)
Look probably the biggest mistake people make in this transition is in the estimate of the amount of time they need to spend working outside the classroom.
For optimal grades you are probably looking at 4-6 hrs pers subject a week. Max total of about an additional 20hrs this is a lot. The first thing you should do is find this time in your week. Start by getting your school timetable out and filling any study periods. Just write in one of your subjects. Then work out what you need to add in the evenings to make your 20 hrs.

Personally I then find it helpful to mark for each planned session the rough task I will be doing- so that allows me to divide up my 6 hrs putting say in maths 2hrs for revision of a previous unit/ work, 2hrs for classwork consolidation and practice 2hrs for HW.

For maths can not stress enough the importance of past papers- however their is a catch- really do not do them till you are ready. Here you must get the balance right between not starting till you are ready and starting too late. I say this as if you start too early you will not be able to answer half the questions and just do really badly and then the paper is rather wasted. If you are taking 3 maths paper sat the end of this year, I recommend that realistically you can complete 2 per week and have access to the o 10 years for each paper=> you will need to start 3-4 months before your exams. People can do many more than this but if you spread it out like that it gives you a chance to consolidate weak parts between papers. So in conclusion I agree past papers are important but need to be used correctly and not in isolation.

Same really goes for chemistry and Biology. Make sure you do the papers but with right approach.

Can not comment really on psychology as I did not do it- the closest I can get is history. For me here what worked well was obtaining relevant introductory undergraduate level texts as they. unlike the A level textbook, presented arguments rather than facts. This tended to push me academically more to think critically as I struggle to argue unless there is something to argue against. Best way I could illustrate this is that I could not write a sentence on a piece of work so I asked someone else to do it but once it was on the page I could manipulate and change it so it said exactly what I wanted it to say.
Name:  Get it together Maths.png
Views: 215
Size:  108.6 KB I know you can barely see it but this is what I've planned out for Maths so far and I have to admit it has been really helpful so far in knowing what I have to get done because I found that at GCSEs even though I was revising all year round my revision had no direct aim and tbh I didn't know how and or when to start past papers so I ran out of time. I've started (sort of) making one for another subject but it's a work in progress.
Thank you for the advice! I'll also try to plan out how I'll spend my 20hrs so that some subjects won't be neglected
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AnimeFreak101
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(Original post by chemman988)
Hi, I am re-doing my AS Chemistry OCR Controlled assessments, and I really need to do well.
Qual CA: • You will attempt to identify four unknown solutions; • You will investigate the effect of heat on three solid compounds.

What would I need to know/go over, in order to do well (i.e. precipitation reactions?) PEASE REPLY ASAP AS IT IS URGENT...
Sorry but I don't do OCR chemistry and in the new A-levels there is no controlled assessments or courseworks, only core practicals
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Kozmo
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(Original post by AnimeFreak101)
Name:  Get it together Maths.png
Views: 215
Size:  108.6 KB I know you can barely see it but this is what I've planned out for Maths so far and I have to admit it has been really helpful so far in knowing what I have to get done because I found that at GCSEs even though I was revising all year round my revision had no direct aim and tbh I didn't know how and or when to start past papers so I ran out of time. I've started (sort of) making one for another subject but it's a work in progress.
Thank you for the advice! I'll also try to plan out how I'll spend my 20hrs so that some subjects won't be neglected
Any chance you could private message me this document? I'd love to have a little look at it and see what you've got planned out as it'd help me plan my learning out too!

Thanks in advance.
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Professor L
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(Original post by AnimeFreak101)
It really does thank you! But the only thing is that the CGP books don't come out until next year! TT.TT So far I've made a progress tracker for Maths which is really useful as it means that no time is wasted. Still figuring out how to make one for biology, chem and psychology though as those ones are not as straight forward and predictable. But I'll try to make one before the next term drags on.
What exam board do you do for each subject?
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AnimeFreak101
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(Original post by Kamara7)
What exam board do you do for each subject?
This is what happens when I procrastinate my replies. My apologises.
I do
Edexcel for Maths
AQA for Chem
Edexcel Salters Nuffield for Bio
AQA for Psychology
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Professor L
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(Original post by AnimeFreak101)
This is what happens when I procrastinate my replies. My apologises.
I do
Edexcel for Maths
AQA for Chem
Edexcel Salters Nuffield for Bio
AQA for Psychology
It's fine There's an AQA chem new CGP book for year 1 of the A Level!
AQA Chem - http://www.amazon.co.uk/New-2015-A-L.../dp/1782943218
I don't know about the others, but hopefully, you can get that AQA chem book for a cheaper price elsewhere
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RoadtoSuccess
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(Original post by AnimeFreak101)
Hello to whoever is bothered to read this. I've just started A-levels and I moved from a state school to a grammar school which is very intimidating because of the difference in environment. Long story short, everyone seems to be used to the whole system and so organised as it is the beginning and I'm struggling to organize myself (not that I was really organised in the first place) but I study Maths, Chemistry, Biology and Psychology. Any advice on how to approach each subject in terms of revision and any advice you will give to someone aiming for at least AAAB in these subjects.

EDIT:
I forgot to add it's a bit different now that all my subjects apart from maths are linear
Need any help with maths i do AQA also I'm doing further maths, just pm me ill be sure to aid you. it will also help me revise as well :P I've done C1 so far and S1 but S1 they taught us too fast. But I'll try my best with whatever you are doing :P i also do biology AQA
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