Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free
x Turn on thread page Beta

American Student Applying to Scottish Universities watch

Announcements
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    Hi there!

    I'm sorry if this question has shown up before. I'm an American student who wants to apply to the University of St. Andrews and the University of Edinburgh. I got a 5 on each of 3 APs, and I have a high SAT score and high GPA.

    I'm a bit confused by the application process. I know St. Andrews lets you use Common App, but Edinburgh requires UCAS. I've seen people say that if you're applying to more than one university, you have to use UCAS. Is this true for an international student?

    Does doing both in UCAS give me an advantage? A disadvantage? I don't quite understand the system!

    Any help would be much appreciated.

    Thanks!
    • TSR Support Team
    Online

    21
    ReputationRep:
    TSR Support Team
    (Original post by sjohnson98)
    Hi there!

    I'm sorry if this question has shown up before. I'm an American student who wants to apply to the University of St. Andrews and the University of Edinburgh. I got a 5 on each of 3 APs, and I have a high SAT score and high GPA.

    I'm a bit confused by the application process. I know St. Andrews lets you use Common App, but Edinburgh requires UCAS. I've seen people say that if you're applying to more than one university, you have to use UCAS. Is this true for an international student?

    Does doing both in UCAS give me an advantage? A disadvantage? I don't quite understand the system!

    Any help would be much appreciated.

    Thanks!
    It just makes things easier. On UCAS you have one personal statement, a reference (that your teacher/guidance counselor will fill out) and all your academic stuff. Granted, there's no where to mention a GPA but you could get your referee to mention it.

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Princepieman)
    It just makes things easier. On UCAS you have one personal statement, a reference (that your teacher/guidance counselor will fill out) and all your academic stuff. Granted, there's no where to mention a GPA but you could get your referee to mention it.

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Most of my stuff will already be on Common App so that's taken care of. Does this mean that even though I'm applying to two UK schools, I don't need to use UCAS for both?
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by sjohnson98)
    Hi there!

    I'm sorry if this question has shown up before. I'm an American student who wants to apply to the University of St. Andrews and the University of Edinburgh. I got a 5 on each of 3 APs, and I have a high SAT score and high GPA.

    I'm a bit confused by the application process. I know St. Andrews lets you use Common App, but Edinburgh requires UCAS. I've seen people say that if you're applying to more than one university, you have to use UCAS. Is this true for an international student?

    Does doing both in UCAS give me an advantage? A disadvantage? I don't quite understand the system!

    Any help would be much appreciated.

    Thanks!
    The advantage of UCAS is that you only fill in one application for 5 universities. So you only have to input your grades once, only have to have one personal statement, your referee only has to provide one reference. Then you just sit back and wait. So if Edinburgh won't take the common app then it makes sense to use UCAS for both because then you only fill out one form. Remember that our personal statements are lot more academically orientated- universities want to know more about why you are right for the course and less about whether you play sport e.c.t.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by jelly1000)
    The advantage of UCAS is that you only fill in one application for 5 universities. So you only have to input your grades once, only have to have one personal statement, your referee only has to provide one reference. Then you just sit back and wait. So if Edinburgh won't take the common app then it makes sense to use UCAS for both because then you only fill out one form. Remember that our personal statements are lot more academically orientated- universities want to know more about why you are right for the course and less about whether you play sport e.c.t.
    Cool, thanks! I just wanted to make sure I wasn't giving myself/losing an advantage by doing one or the other.
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    May I ask what you are planning to apply for at these two universities?
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by IssyTeri)
    May I ask what you are planning to apply for at these two universities?
    Of course! I'm applying to study history.

    Out of curiosity, since I already made this post, how do I know if I'm applying as an individual vs through my school? No one at my high school has any experience with UCAS and I'm just trying to figure things out.
    • TSR Support Team
    Online

    21
    ReputationRep:
    TSR Support Team
    (Original post by sjohnson98)
    Of course! I'm applying to study history.

    Out of curiosity, since I already made this post, how do I know if I'm applying as an individual vs through my school? No one at my high school has any experience with UCAS and I'm just trying to figure things out.
    Your school would need to register as a UCAS centre, they can then provide you with a 'buzz word' to connect your application to their system.

    If I'm being honest, it's unlikely other people will be applying through UCAS any time soon via your school - so I'd just select individual. All you need to do then is enter in the details of your referee, an email is then sent to them to provide your predicted grades and the reference.

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Offline

    17
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by sjohnson98)
    Hi there!

    I'm sorry if this question has shown up before. I'm an American student who wants to apply to the University of St. Andrews and the University of Edinburgh. I got a 5 on each of 3 APs, and I have a high SAT score and high GPA.

    I'm a bit confused by the application process. I know St. Andrews lets you use Common App, but Edinburgh requires UCAS. I've seen people say that if you're applying to more than one university, you have to use UCAS. Is this true for an international student?

    Does doing both in UCAS give me an advantage? A disadvantage? I don't quite understand the system!

    Any help would be much appreciated.

    Thanks!
    You can use Common App only if you're applying to a maximum of one UK uni, in most cases. You certainly can't use it in addition to UCAS to give yourself more than 5 choices.

    I'd really recommend reading the TSR wiki articles about applying through UCAS - the links are at the top of every page.

    Don't forget that there are more than two universities in the UK! Those are the two that attract most American students, but there are plenty of other excellent ones, and as you get 5 choices on your UCAS form you may as well make use of it. If you want to study in Scotland, look at Glasgow. If you're willing to go further afield, then Russell Group universities are a good place to start (NB not all good unis are Russell Group!)

    (Original post by sjohnson98)
    Of course! I'm applying to study history.

    Out of curiosity, since I already made this post, how do I know if I'm applying as an individual vs through my school? No one at my high school has any experience with UCAS and I'm just trying to figure things out.
    If your school isn't registered on UCAS (highly unlikely from what you've said) then you'll need to apply as an individual.

    On a side note, do read the guides to writing a personal statement - it's COMPLETELY different to writing a college admissions essay.

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Origami Bullets)
    You can use Common App only if you're applying to a maximum of one UK uni, in most cases. You certainly can't use it in addition to UCAS to give yourself more than 5 choices.

    I'd really recommend reading the TSR wiki articles about applying through UCAS - the links are at the top of every page.

    Don't forget that there are more than two universities in the UK! Those are the two that attract most American students, but there are plenty of other excellent ones, and as you get 5 choices on your UCAS form you may as well make use of it. If you want to study in Scotland, look at Glasgow. If you're willing to go further afield, then Russell Group universities are a good place to start (NB not all good unis are Russell Group!)



    If your school isn't registered on UCAS (highly unlikely from what you've said) then you'll need to apply as an individual.

    On a side note, do read the guides to writing a personal statement - it's COMPLETELY different to writing a college admissions essay.

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Thanks so much! I know there are a bunch of universities, but I'm already applying to quite a few in the US so I've really got to limit my applications.

    Are you saying that if I'm applying to both St. Andrews and Edinburgh, I need to apply to both through UCAS?
    Offline

    18
    (Original post by sjohnson98)
    Hi there!

    I'm sorry if this question has shown up before. I'm an American student who wants to apply to the University of St. Andrews and the University of Edinburgh. I got a 5 on each of 3 APs, and I have a high SAT score and high GPA.

    I'm a bit confused by the application process. I know St. Andrews lets you use Common App, but Edinburgh requires UCAS. I've seen people say that if you're applying to more than one university, you have to use UCAS. Is this true for an international student?

    Does doing both in UCAS give me an advantage? A disadvantage? I don't quite understand the system!

    Any help would be much appreciated.

    Thanks!
    You'd probably be better off applying to five universities through UCAS since it's unlikely that you'd be allowed to use both UCAS and Common Application unless you're applying to only one university through UCAS -- the reason being that they don't want you to have more than five choices by virtue of being American.

    With those stats, you should look at some of the other universities as well because you'll have a good shot pretty much everywhere with 5s in three APs, a good GPA and a good SAT score. I'm not sure about this but you may want to check to see whether some universities also require SAT subject tests although I suspect they won't if your APs are in relevant subjects.
    • TSR Support Team
    Online

    21
    ReputationRep:
    TSR Support Team
    (Original post by sjohnson98)
    Thanks so much! I know there are a bunch of universities, but I'm already applying to quite a few in the US so I've really got to limit my applications.

    Are you saying that if I'm applying to both St. Andrews and Edinburgh, I need to apply to both through UCAS?
    It'd be MUCH easier. And, you could also add 3 more universities without doing any other essays, recommendations or what have you. It's all on the one form.

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Offline

    18
    (Original post by sjohnson98)
    Thanks so much! I know there are a bunch of universities, but I'm already applying to quite a few in the US so I've really got to limit my applications.
    You don't need to do that with UCAS though. You fill in only one application form and the same form is sent to all your choices so there's literally nothing to lose by applying to the maximum number -- besides, you'll have a better chance of an offer if you apply to five instead of two.

    Have you thought about finances? Unlike American universities, British universities tend to treat international students as cash cows because they're not allowed to charge Home/EU students more than a certain amount (currently £9 000/year) but they are allowed to charge international students what they want. I've heard that some of your government grants are available to you even if you study outside the United States so that might be something to look into.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Hydeman)

    Have you thought about finances? Unlike American universities, British universities tend to treat international students as cash cows because they're not allowed to charge Home/EU students more than a certain amount (currently £9 000/year) but they are allowed to charge international students what they want. I've heard that some of your government grants are available to you even if you study outside the United States so that might be something to look into.
    This is going to make me seem very rich and privileged, but the cost of these schools as an international student seems low to me! The truth is that as an international student, with about $25,000 to pay in tuition each year, I'd be saving tens of thousands of dollars. US schools regularly charge more than $60,000 a year.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    Is there an extra charge for applying to more universities or is it one flat rate?
    Offline

    18
    (Original post by sjohnson98)
    This is going to make me seem very rich and privileged, but the cost of these schools as an international student seems low to me! The truth is that as an international student, with about $25,000 to pay in tuition each year, I'd be saving tens of thousands of dollars. US schools regularly charge more than $60,000 a year.
    I understand. A lot of American students on this website have said that it's actually cheaper to study here. I meant from the perspective of being able to get grants and loans -- while I'm not sure how exactly it works in America, British students are only entitled to government financial support if they go to a British university. Anywhere else and we're on our own. :lol:
    Offline

    18
    (Original post by sjohnson98)
    Is there an extra charge for applying to more universities or is it one flat rate?
    The charge for applying to a single university is lower than the charge for applying to several universities but it's like this: the cost for applying to more than one is the same regardless of how many you apply to (within the limit). So applying to two costs exactly the same as applying to five and it's pretty cheap (£23, I think).
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Hydeman)
    I understand. A lot of American students on this website have said that it's actually cheaper to study here. I meant from the perspective of being able to get grants and loans -- while I'm not sure how exactly it works in America, British students are only entitled to government financial support if they go to a British university. Anywhere else and we're on our own. :lol:
    It really is cheaper! I'll still have debt, but more than one hundred thousand dollars less, so... We can't get government aid if we go overseas, but there are still lots of private organizations. College is so expensive for us that lots of non-profits/philanthropists offer money.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Hydeman)
    The charge for applying to a single university is lower than the charge for applying to several universities but it's like this: the cost for applying to more than one is the same regardless of how many you apply to (within the limit). So applying to two costs exactly the same as applying to five and it's pretty cheap (£23, I think).
    Oh man that's a fraction of what it costs to apply to just one school! I think the average application fee for schools in the US is $75 now.
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by sjohnson98)
    Is there an extra charge for applying to more universities or is it one flat rate?
    There is an extra charge for applying to more than one uni via UCAS - its £12 for one uni, £23 for two to five.
 
 
 
Poll
Do you agree with the proposed ban on plastic straws and cotton buds?
Applying to uni

All the essentials

The adventure begins mug

Student life: what to expect

What it's really like going to uni

Graduates celebrate

How to write a good personal statement

Expert PS advice from the people who will read it

Uni match

Uni match

Can't decide where to apply? Our tool will help you find the perfect course

Two students working together

A-Z of universities

Read our guides to unis and colleges from around the UK

A student working on a computer

Personal statement help

Use our tool to get your ideal PS quickly!

Hands typing

Degrees without fees

Discover more about degree-level apprenticeships.

A student looking down a microscope

Planning open days

Find upcoming open days and get advice on preparing.

Help out other students

These questions still need an answer

Groups associated with this forum:

View associated groups

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Write a reply...
Reply
Hide
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.