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I get really depressed the day before my period? watch

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    I mean depressed. I feel like everything in my life is wrong, everyone is against me and my friends don't like me, my boyfriend doesn't like me. I feel like I need to burst into tears all the time and there is a pit in the bottom of my stomach or a hole in my heart. I feel like there's a dark storm cloud in my brain and telling myself it's just because of my hormones and period doesn't help or make it any less real. I want to be around people and feel if I'm not with them it's because they don't want to be with me... but then if I am around people I want to be alone. I overthink everything. I get annoyed really easily. All this usually only lasts for the day and I suppose 12 days a year isn't bad but I hate the feeling.

    The only thing that I found to help is my pill. Is all of this normal? I've heard of PMT obviously but my friends I've talked to don't get like this. Other than this as far as I am aware I am mentally healthy.
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    (Original post by Moura)
    I mean depressed.

    No you don't. You mean sad/emotional/unstable/teary/melancholic/anxious/hyper. Depression isn't an adjective, it's a long-term disorder. You don't just 'get' depressed for one day.

    That being said, your flippant use of 'depressed' doesn't make your symptoms any less real. You should see your doctor, they may be able to help you if this is disrupting your life
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    (Original post by ElectrasHeart)
    No you don't. You mean sad/emotional/unstable/teary/melancholic/anxious/hyper. Depression isn't an adjective, it's a long-term disorder. You don't just 'get' depressed for one day.

    That being said, your flippant use of 'depressed' doesn't make your symptoms any less real. You should see your doctor, they may be able to help you if this is disrupting your life
    I could not have put that better myself.
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    (Original post by ElectrasHeart)
    No you don't. You mean sad/emotional/unstable/teary/melancholic/anxious/hyper. Depression isn't an adjective, it's a long-term disorder. You don't just 'get' depressed for one day.

    That being said, your flippant use of 'depressed' doesn't make your symptoms any less real. You should see your doctor, they may be able to help you if this is disrupting your life
    Sorry but you are wrong. Have a look in a dictionary.
    http://www.oxforddictionaries.com/de...lish/depressed
    I think my use fits in very nicely with the first definition.

    I don't understand what is wrong with people on the internet. Rather than helping someone who clearly has a problem that is starting to affect their work and relationships (and certainly not something I would talk about flippantly) you chose to comment (incorrectly) on my choice of vocabulary.
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    PMDD it's the depressed side of PMS but the feelings of depression are a lot more intense. See your GP hun
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    (Original post by Little Popcorns)
    PMDD it's the depressed side of PMS but the feelings of depression are a lot more intense. See your GP hun
    Thanks I just had a look into this it sounds like it could be it thank you very much
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    (Original post by Moura)
    Sorry but you are wrong. Have a look in a dictionary.
    http://www.oxforddictionaries.com/de...lish/depressed
    I think my use fits in very nicely with the first definition.

    I don't understand what is wrong with people on the internet. Rather than helping someone who clearly has a problem that is starting to affect their work and relationships (and certainly not something I would talk about flippantly) you chose to comment (incorrectly) on my choice of vocabulary.
    Using 'depressed' to describe a temporary mood trivialises the experiences of people suffering from depression. Yes you probably feel like **** and it's awful and you should see a doctor to see if they can help you but you get that awful feeling for approximately one day a month and you know that it'll be gone by the next day. I've had it for over 6 years.
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    (Original post by SmallTownGirl)
    Using 'depressed' to describe a temporary mood trivialises the experiences of people suffering from depression. Yes you probably feel like **** and it's awful and you should see a doctor to see if they can help you but you get that awful feeling for approximately one day a month and you know that it'll be gone by the next day. I've had it for over 6 years.
    NHS website:

    http://www.nhs.uk/Conditions/Premens.../Symptoms.aspx

    I am not saying I am diagnosed with this obviously, though I have booked a doctors appointment (though thank you to the poster who pointed me in this direction) but the symptoms under "PMDD" include depression. Do they mean clinical depression is a symptom of this? No, they mean the feeling of depression (which is not exclusive to people with clinical depression NOR people with any diagnosed mental illnesses) is a symptom. Depression is a word used to describe a feeling that includes a range of emotions (sadness, empty, loney.. as I expanded how I feel in my OP) and is not a word exclusively used for people WITH the medical problem depression. It is not trivialising anything since it is used to describe a feeling which is, lets be honest, utterly ****. So I think people understand feeling that way all the time is pretty hard to deal with.

    There is even a whole wikipedia page dedicated to it ( https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Depression_(mood )
    I am sorry you feel like this chronically however that does not mean you have a monopoly on the word. It also does not mean you have the right to belittle how I feel just because it's not all the time.
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    (Original post by Moura)
    NHS website:

    http://www.nhs.uk/Conditions/Premens.../Symptoms.aspx

    I am not saying I am diagnosed with this obviously, though I have booked a doctors appointment (though thank you to the poster who pointed me in this direction) but the symptoms under "PMDD" include depression. Do they mean clinical depression is a symptom of this? No, they mean the feeling of depression (which is not exclusive to people with clinical depression NOR people with any diagnosed mental illnesses) is a symptom. Depression is a word used to describe a feeling that includes a range of emotions (sadness, empty, loney.. as I expanded how I feel in my OP) and is not a word exclusively used for people WITH the medical problem depression. It is not trivialising anything since it is used to describe a feeling which is, lets be honest, utterly ****. So I think people understand feeling that way all the time is pretty hard to deal with.

    There is even a whole wikipedia page dedicated to it ( https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Depression_(mood )
    I am sorry you feel like this chronically however that does not mean you have a monopoly on the word. It also does not mean you have the right to belittle how I feel just because it's not all the time.
    People with depression SHOULD be the only ones able to use it to describe how they feel. It's an illness. I'm not saying what you personally are feeling isn't awful (I know it is - it's been my life for years) and that you shouldn't see if you can get meds but people say they're 'depressed' because their favourite sports team lost a match and they're just disappointed. It makes it easier for people without depression to say that my illness isn't important. It means than when I tell someone I'm 'really depressed right now' they say **** like 'just think yourself happy' or 'it'll go away soon' because they don't see me as ill. It makes it easier for people to say that they know how I feel because they were mildly sad once and they got over it by eating healthily and doing exercise because they don't realise that I often can't leave my bed. Depression has meant I've lost a lot of my friends because they don't want to deal with my illness. It's meant I've dropped out of two degrees because I cannot focus. It means my memory is shot to the point where I often can't remember whether I had breakfast and will often ask a friend how they are three times in an hour because I can't remember having done it previously.

    Society often thinks it's acceptable to use mental illnesses to describe feelings or actions for people who do not have that mental illness. I cannot think of any other illnesses that are so misunderstood and considered so trivial that people use them as 'cute quirks' or to suggest someone of something is dangerous when that person or thing has no connection to the condition.

    Go to your GP, see what they can do for you. But don't argue that an illness that has destroyed my life is just a temporary mood that anyone can use when they're a little upset.
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    You're not alone in feeling like this, many girls (including me) get like this during the week before their period. I even went to the doctor because i didn't understand why i was feeling so depressed for only a certain amount of days a month and i also got put on the pill. The fact that you've recognised it is a good start and you need to reassure yourself before the day comes, knowing what you're going to feel like and how to tackle it face on. Try keeping yourself occupied that day or make sure the day previous was good and can keep you happy for a while, pulling yourself out of it may be difficult but it can be done (talking from experience). On that day do things that you like. Also maybe it could be because you're holding things in and they build up until you're vulnerable however i can't speak on behalf of you. Hope this helps and i hope you feel better soon just try to get through it and it'll be easier each time the day comes around. Good luck love
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    I used to get like this with my period (before I went on the pill). My moods would be so extreme and I ended up having to go on the pill because of it. The doctor diagnosed me with PMDD which is like an extreme version of PMS. I've been on Cerazette now for four years and my moods are nowhere near as bad now whenever I get a bleed.

    I remember I felt awful as soon as I ovulated and the week up to my period was hellish but the second I started bleeding, my mood automatically raised, even if I was bad pain with cramps

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    (Original post by SmallTownGirl)
    People with depression SHOULD be the only ones able to use it to describe how they feel. It's an illness. I'm not saying what you personally are feeling isn't awful (I know it is - it's been my life for years) and that you shouldn't see if you can get meds but people say they're 'depressed' because their favourite sports team lost a match and they're just disappointed. It makes it easier for people without depression to say that my illness isn't important. It means than when I tell someone I'm 'really depressed right now' they say **** like 'just think yourself happy' or 'it'll go away soon' because they don't see me as ill. It makes it easier for people to say that they know how I feel because they were mildly sad once and they got over it by eating healthily and doing exercise because they don't realise that I often can't leave my bed. Depression has meant I've lost a lot of my friends because they don't want to deal with my illness. It's meant I've dropped out of two degrees because I cannot focus. It means my memory is shot to the point where I often can't remember whether I had breakfast and will often ask a friend how they are three times in an hour because I can't remember having done it previously.

    Society often thinks it's acceptable to use mental illnesses to describe feelings or actions for people who do not have that mental illness. I cannot think of any other illnesses that are so misunderstood and considered so trivial that people use them as 'cute quirks' or to suggest someone of something is dangerous when that person or thing has no connection to the condition.

    Go to your GP, see what they can do for you. But don't argue that an illness that has destroyed my life is just a temporary mood that anyone can use when they're a little upset.
    With all due respect, I do see why you feel so strongly about this, but what you are talking about and what is happening in this thread are two different things.

    Depression as an adjective for a mood does not have a length of time qualifier. Clinical depression as a disorder does.
    Misuse of the word is very damaging, like you say - but also like you say, that happens when it is used to describe someone's favourite sports team losing. If someone experiences a mental state of depression, no matter how brief or what caused it (hormones, pregnancy, death, drug reactions), then it should be described as such. For example: If someone attempts suicide after taking synthetic cannabis, then makes a full recovery within a day - were they not feeling depressed? They were. They would be right to claim: 'I got really depressed. I mean depressed.' It's also important that feelings of depression are recorded among side effects for some prescription drugs. Saying 'a little upset' instead trivialises the risks.

    What the OP describes is not mild, although thankfully it is also extremely brief. If she was to experience that every day for months, she could be diagnosed depressed. If someone felt the same disappointment as their sports team losing for months, they'd still only be mildly sad. There is the distinction between use and misuse.

    To claim that no one experiences the main symptom from one disorder unless they have it is false but also more importantly, just causing you unnecessary stress and upset when you come across it. Some people experience my symptoms in a much less chronic way (eg. a very similar experience might be had during a bad drug trip - transient mental states are possible, our brains all function in essentially the same ways) and personally, I'm glad that they can begin to glean an understanding without having to suffer nearly as much.

    Of course if I could be ill only 12 days per annum instead of the last 8 years solid my life would look very different (!!!) but OP isn't claiming to be ill like you or me, only stating her own experience as it is.

    Edit: I didn't mean for this to look so long, I hope you don't feel personally attacked or anything.
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    (Original post by SmallTownGirl)
    People with depression SHOULD be the only ones able to use it to describe how they feel. It's an illness. I'm not saying what you personally are feeling isn't awful (I know it is - it's been my life for years) and that you shouldn't see if you can get meds but people say they're 'depressed' because their favourite sports team lost a match and they're just disappointed. It makes it easier for people without depression to say that my illness isn't important. It means than when I tell someone I'm 'really depressed right now' they say **** like 'just think yourself happy' or 'it'll go away soon' because they don't see me as ill. It makes it easier for people to say that they know how I feel because they were mildly sad once and they got over it by eating healthily and doing exercise because they don't realise that I often can't leave my bed. Depression has meant I've lost a lot of my friends because they don't want to deal with my illness. It's meant I've dropped out of two degrees because I cannot focus. It means my memory is shot to the point where I often can't remember whether I had breakfast and will often ask a friend how they are three times in an hour because I can't remember having done it previously.

    Society often thinks it's acceptable to use mental illnesses to describe feelings or actions for people who do not have that mental illness. I cannot think of any other illnesses that are so misunderstood and considered so trivial that people use them as 'cute quirks' or to suggest someone of something is dangerous when that person or thing has no connection to the condition.

    Go to your GP, see what they can do for you. But don't argue that an illness that has destroyed my life is just a temporary mood that anyone can use when they're a little upset.
    yeah and did i say that because my favourite sports team lost? no... so go and target the people who really use it in trivial situations and stop being so unnecessarily rude to me for using it in a completely correct way.
    If anyone one says this kind of thing when you tell them you are feeling depressed and they KNOW you have depression they clearly lack empathy or understanding which is a result of lack of education about mental illnesses as a whole, not because of me using this word to legitimately describe my symptoms.
    I don't even know what you're going on about in your last paragraph seeing as I have not claimed the way you feel is a temporary mood. Stop directing your anger at people who have done absolutely nothing wrong and maybe start confronting the people in your life who have been unsupportive.
 
 
 
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