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What can I do to make my personal statement for psychology stand out? watch

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    So far it doesn't really sound too interesting although I have done quite a bit I don't have any interesting work experience and it's unlikely that i will get any. I've done NCS, DOFe, volunteering for a charity for 6 months and I mentioned two books that i have read one of them is a nursing book and the other is called The boy who was raised as a dog.
    Will this be enough?
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    Volunteering means little
    You don't need work experience
    Wider reading is important - a nursing book isn't too relevant. Haven't heard of the other book but if you can be critical of it in your PS it will help

    I would recommend doing some more reading, or online lectures (I recommend UC Berkeley on youtube for various psych courses)
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    (Original post by Noodlzzz)
    Volunteering means little
    You don't need work experience
    Wider reading is important - a nursing book isn't too relevant. Haven't heard of the other book but if you can be critical of it in your PS it will help

    I would recommend doing some more reading, or online lectures (I recommend UC Berkeley on youtube for various psych courses)
    I'm curious, do you know for a fact that volunteering and work experience don't count? I realise they aren't academic pursuits, but does it not show general commitment?

    I wonder how my PS would read now (9 years on), I think it was full of generic crap - no extra reading or anything.
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    (Original post by _Sinnie_)
    I'm curious, do you know for a fact that volunteering and work experience don't count? I realise they aren't academic pursuits, but does it not show general commitment?

    I wonder how my PS would read now (9 years on), I think it was full of generic crap - no extra reading or anything.
    It's not that work experience or volunteering don't count, but the reality is that very few people are going to be able to get something directly related to psychology, which the admissions tutors accept and understand, which is why extra reading is good
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    (Original post by *Interrobang*)
    It's not that work experience or volunteering don't count, but the reality is that very few people are going to be able to get something directly related to psychology, which the admissions tutors accept and understand, which is why extra reading is good
    I was just going off Noodlzzz comment in which she said that volunteering means little and you don't need work experience - I was generally curious if that is a 'definitive' position, whereby further reading is 'worth more'. I'd have said that linking DofE volunteering (depending on what it was) to Psychology would read quite well and if they get other voluntary experience (youth groups are a great one) then I'd imagine that would stand out from all the people listing the books they have 'read'. I'm well out of the undergraduate game and so struggle to offer advice on PS and such.

    Work experience can be used to show responsibility, self discipline and general commitment above college - which is what everyone has. I think it would come down to what you write about these things. I'm not dismissing further reading, of course.


    On a side note, I actually did just find my PS and it is far worse than I thought it would be, though I did mention two whole books that I definitely did 'read' and the subject areas of three more, which I assure you I definitely bought and 'read' thoroughly. I then spent two paragraphs going on about all the countries I was going to travel to (and never did) and how it would make me better at Psychology! Basically I sound like an idealistic child. I wonder if I posted it up and had the current crop of students critique, how well it would stand up - I think not very well.

    I'm actually in the middle of the ClinPsy application now, how things change!
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    (Original post by _Sinnie_)
    I was just going off Noodlzzz comment in which she said that volunteering means little and you don't need work experience - I was generally curious if that is a 'definitive' position, whereby further reading is 'worth more'. I'd have said that linking DofE volunteering (depending on what it was) to Psychology would read quite well and if they get other voluntary experience (youth groups are a great one) then I'd imagine that would stand out from all the people listing the books they have 'read'. I'm well out of the undergraduate game and so struggle to offer advice on PS and such.

    Work experience can be used to show responsibility, self discipline and general commitment above college - which is what everyone has. I think it would come down to what you write about these things. I'm not dismissing further reading, of course.


    On a side note, I actually did just find my PS and it is far worse than I thought it would be, though I did mention two whole books that I definitely did 'read' and the subject areas of three more, which I assure you I definitely bought and 'read' thoroughly. I then spent two paragraphs going on about all the countries I was going to travel to (and never did) and how it would make me better at Psychology! Basically I sound like an idealistic child. I wonder if I posted it up and had the current crop of students critique, how well it would stand up - I think not very well.

    I'm actually in the middle of the ClinPsy application now, how things change!
    Yes but they mean little because of the reasons that I mentioned. As for a job, it is put elsewhere on the application. Also just because someone has commitment to a job doesn't automatically mean they will have commitment to the course
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    (Original post by _Sinnie_)
    I was just going off Noodlzzz comment in which she said that volunteering means little and you don't need work experience - I was generally curious if that is a 'definitive' position, whereby further reading is 'worth more'. I'd have said that linking DofE volunteering (depending on what it was) to Psychology would read quite well and if they get other voluntary experience (youth groups are a great one) then I'd imagine that would stand out from all the people listing the books they have 'read'. I'm well out of the undergraduate game and so struggle to offer advice on PS and such.

    Work experience can be used to show responsibility, self discipline and general commitment above college - which is what everyone has. I think it would come down to what you write about these things. I'm not dismissing further reading, of course.


    On a side note, I actually did just find my PS and it is far worse than I thought it would be, though I did mention two whole books that I definitely did 'read' and the subject areas of three more, which I assure you I definitely bought and 'read' thoroughly. I then spent two paragraphs going on about all the countries I was going to travel to (and never did) and how it would make me better at Psychology! Basically I sound like an idealistic child. I wonder if I posted it up and had the current crop of students critique, how well it would stand up - I think not very well.

    I'm actually in the middle of the ClinPsy application now, how things change!
    Thanks just wondering is it essential to mention achievements or clubs in school? I participated in a carol concert once and joined a society in school for a few months but I don't think a carol concert is that relevant to psychology but one of my teachers said it would be useful to mention it.
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    (Original post by raven48)
    Thanks just wondering is it essential to mention achievements or clubs in school? I participated in a carol concert once and joined a society in school for a few months but I don't think a carol concert is that relevant to psychology but one of my teachers said it would be useful to mention it.
    Extra curricular activities not related to the course aren't really important, but can be mentioned briefly, altho it would depend on how long ago things were as to whether it would be worth mentioning them
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    Just make sure you show that you're interested, that's probably the most important thing. They like to hear how the subjects you're studying now will be useful for you in the future/during the degree, and what you can bring to the university. Make note of any hobbies that are relevant, books you've read as well as authors, comment on things within psychology that you know about and are interested in, show that you've looked into it good luck!

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    (Original post by Elastichedgehog)
    Just make sure you show that you're interested, that's probably the most important thing. They like to hear how the subjects you're studying now will be useful for you in the future/during the degree, and what you can bring to the university. Make note of any hobbies that are relevant, books you've read as well as authors, comment on things within psychology that you know about and are interested in, show that you've looked into it good luck!

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    Actually it is unnecessary to talk about the subjects that you are studying now, because the admissions tutors will know the sorts of things covered and the skills gained - they don't really add anything. What they do like is the extra reading stuff related to your course. As for the what you can bring to the university - realistically, this will be very little, as you will be one person in a group of thousands. Yes, you may play sport and it is fine to mention that briefly, but all admissions tutors care about is your interest in the course and your ability to succeed
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    (Original post by *Interrobang*)
    Actually it is unnecessary to talk about the subjects that you are studying now, because the admissions tutors will know the sorts of things covered and the skills gained - they don't really add anything. What they do like is the extra reading stuff related to your course. As for the what you can bring to the university - realistically, this will be very little, as you will be one person in a group of thousands. Yes, you may play sport and it is fine to mention that briefly, but all admissions tutors care about is your interest in the course and your ability to succeed
    I agree against listing your subjects, because the admission offices are obviously going to see what subjects you're taking on your application. What I was trying to say was it seems appropriate to convey any transferable skills that you've gained from doing these subjects. In terms of what you can bring to the university, I meant more about what skills and such. Extra curricular activities are good, as long as they're relevant however, I believe. (Although I agree it should be kept brief). My main point is just to show enthusiasm.
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    (Original post by Elastichedgehog)
    I agree against listing your subjects, because the admission offices are obviously going to see what subjects you're taking on your application. What I was trying to say was it seems appropriate to convey any transferable skills that you've gained from doing these subjects. In terms of what you can bring to the university, I meant more about what skills and such. Extra curricular activities are good, as long as they're relevant however, I believe. (Although I agree it should be kept brief). My main point is just to show enthusiasm.
    They will know (for example) that English Literature A Level improves your essay writing skills - there isn't much point in telling the admissions tutors something that will apply to a lot of candidates, and something they will already be able to see from your qualifications section. The more individual stuff, such as extra reading (and work experience, if relevant - which is more important than some subjects than others) is what the admissions tutors will be interested in. As for the skills to bring to the university - my point still stands. You are going to be one person in a large group of people joining and already attending the university. The impact you will have on the institution is minimal for 99% of those people (and most will only make a major impact if they become part of the SU after graduation) - the admissions tutors just want to see your commitment to the course, as that's where they are based. I'm not saying don't mention extra-curricular activities like volunteering etc., but it won't really be missed if they aren't included due to space (or because you don't have any)
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    (Original post by *Interrobang*)
    They will know (for example) that English Literature A Level improves your essay writing skills - there isn't much point in telling the admissions tutors something that will apply to a lot of candidates, and something they will already be able to see from your qualifications section. The more individual stuff, such as extra reading (and work experience, if relevant - which is more important than some subjects than others) is what the admissions tutors will be interested in. As for the skills to bring to the university - my point still stands. You are going to be one person in a large group of people joining and already attending the university. The impact you will have on the institution is minimal for 99% of those people (and most will only make a major impact if they become part of the SU after graduation) - the admissions tutors just want to see your commitment to the course, as that's where they are based. I'm not saying don't mention extra-curricular activities like volunteering etc., but it won't really be missed if they aren't included due to space (or because you don't have any)
    Thanks for the feedback I understand, and agree with most of your points, and from what I can tell you'd know more about personal statement structuring than me. I was just advising on how I approached my personal statement. I don't have much to expand on, but good luck to the OP
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    (Original post by Elastichedgehog)
    Thanks for the feedback I understand, and agree with most of your points, and from what I can tell you'd know more about personal statement structuring than me. I was just advising on how I approached my personal statement. I don't have much to expand on, but good luck to the OP
    I was a PS Helper when we had the free review service. Unfortunately, a lot of people get help from teachers, who do their best, but are not really informed on this sort of thing
 
 
 
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