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    Hello everyone!

    I am a French citizen holding a bachelor degree. I am planning on submitting my applications to french and irish medical schools.

    If I have any choice, I really wonder what would be the best option. Here are my thoughts:

    - Being a EU citizen, residency won't be a problem in Ireland. Going back to France for residency could be a challenge since there is a national exam in the final year to determine one's medical speciality.

    - Being a graduate student, I am mainly focusing on the GEP which is a 4 year program compared to the 6 years medical programs in France. (I am 25 years old).

    - Studying in Ireland could be a an amazing experience, I have never studied abroad and it could be my only shot living in a different country (before a really long time anyway if I stayed in France).

    - I would have to pass the Gamsat (as a non-native English speaker!) but If I am accepted in Ireland, it would be a done deal when in France, I would still have the first year "concours" (a competition which results on an average of 15% students who can pursue a medical education).

    - And really, the biggest issue is money.

    If I'd stayed in France, I could focused on studying and could maybe earn money somehow during the first years but mostly be out of debt in the end.

    If I go to Ireland I will have to get a loan of almost 100000 euros ( a lot, I am not used to that, in France universities are generally cheap and even if you go to a Grande Ecole - for those of you who know them- you would never have to get a loan as important)

    I can really see advantages and inconveniences in both options. An externe point of view will definitely be helpful!

    Thank you
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    Alors au final tu as fait quoi?
    Je suis aussi une graduate et je pense tenter la PACES l'année prochaine :/
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    (Original post by arigziegler)
    Alors au final tu as fait quoi?
    Je suis aussi une graduate et je pense tenter la PACES l'année prochaine :/
    Garde la discussion en anglais pour que les autres puissent aussi comprendre. C'est impoli.

    OP, you have a very similar dilemma to myself and I've come to quite a simple conclusion.

    With the free movement of peoples across the EU, the French government is obliged to recognise an Irish degree as equivalent to a French one as such you will be able to get the national medical diploma equivalency, allowing you to practice in France without any limitations. Being a French national should make things simpler for you.

    More to your concerns:

    (Original post by Ayga)
    Being a EU citizen, residency won't be a problem in Ireland. Going back to France for residency could be a challenge since there is a national exam in the final year to determine one's medical speciality.
    Yes, this is indeed an issue. However, Irish residencies are also an option (as are the UK ones). Can you not sit the 'match' exams in France if you've earned your diploma from outside the country?

    (Original post by Ayga)
    Being a graduate student, I am mainly focusing on the GEP which is a 4 year program compared to the 6 years medical programs in France. (I am 25 years old).
    Believe me when I say this: age is not important when it comes to studying. I have spent a few years considering medicine and the top surgeons and specialists that I managed to get in touch with all said that your age will not play a part. Your education and clinical weighs in a lot more. Again, I'm neither French nor Irish but I am from continental Europe and our system is very similar to the French one.

    Having said that, the fact is that you will be a qualified doctor in five years if you go to Ireland instead of staying in France. Moreover, the PACES are no joke (I believe the pass rate is approximately 18% or so).

    (Original post by Ayga)
    Studying in Ireland could be a an amazing experience, I have never studied abroad and it could be my only shot living in a different country (before a really long time anyway if I stayed in France).
    Indeed. Ireland, despite what many have said, has a very interesting and top-notch medical system. Their four-year medical degree is very similar to the American one (which produces some of the world's best doctors).

    (Original post by Ayga)
    I would have to pass the Gamsat (as a non-native English speaker!) but If I am accepted in Ireland, it would be a done deal when in France, I would still have the first year "concours" (a competition which results on an average of 15% students who can pursue a medical education).
    Absolutely. Having said that, I find the Irish GEP application procedure to be far more meritocratic than the French concours or the British emphasis on work experience. The belief in Irish institutions is that you will learn the basics during your four-years.

    (Original post by Ayga)
    And really, the biggest issue is money.
    This is something that is very personal and only you can answer that. The question you need to ask yourself is whether the investment is worth making. What you could always do is sit the GAMSAT in March and September 2018 and spend a year attempting to pass the concours.
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    (Original post by Mahavir)
    Garde la discussion en anglais pour que les autres puissent aussi comprendre. C'est impoli.

    OP, you have a very similar dilemma to myself and I've come to quite a simple conclusion.

    With the free movement of peoples across the EU, the French government is obliged to recognise an Irish degree as equivalent to a French one as such you will be able to get the national medical diploma equivalency, allowing you to practice in France without any limitations. Being a French national should make things simpler for you.

    More to your concerns:



    Yes, this is indeed an issue. However, Irish residencies are also an option (as are the UK ones). Can you not sit the 'match' exams in France if you've earned your diploma from outside the country?



    Believe me when I say this: age is not important when it comes to studying. I have spent a few years considering medicine and the top surgeons and specialists that I managed to get in touch with all said that your age will not play a part. Your education and clinical weighs in a lot more. Again, I'm neither French nor Irish but I am from continental Europe and our system is very similar to the French one.

    Having said that, the fact is that you will be a qualified doctor in five years if you go to Ireland instead of staying in France. Moreover, the PACES are no joke (I believe the pass rate is approximately 18% or so).



    Indeed. Ireland, despite what many have said, has a very interesting and top-notch medical system. Their four-year medical degree is very similar to the American one (which produces some of the world's best doctors).



    Absolutely. Having said that, I find the Irish GEP application procedure to be far more meritocratic than the French concours or the British emphasis on work experience. The belief in Irish institutions is that you will learn the basics during your four-years.



    This is something that is very personal and only you can answer that. The question you need to ask yourself is whether the investment is worth making. What you could always do is sit the GAMSAT in March and September 2018 and spend a year attempting to pass the concours.
    Je ne vois pas comment c’est impoli sachant que ce thread a 3 ans et que jusque la personne n’y avait répondu but suit yourself
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    (Original post by arigziegler)
    Je ne vois pas comment c’est impoli sachant que ce thread a 3 ans et que jusque la personne n’y avait répondu but suit yourself
    Because this is an english-speaking forum and there are people from all over who search the threads. It's about helping each other out.
 
 
 
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