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Auditioning for National Youth Theatre 2016 watch

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    I've only just found out about the National Youth Theatre at the age of 20- I genuinely don't know how! I've always wanted to act but there aren't a lot of opportunities where I'm from so I don't have a lot of experience apart from a bit of extra work. I know it's very prestigious so I'm worried my lack of experience will hinder me a lot. Has anyone auditioned or is thinking of auditioning? What was your experience like? Do you think it's a bad idea to audition without previous experience in drama? Feel free to discuss any other NYT audition-related topics as well, I'm keen to hear all sorts of perspectives.
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    basically audition with a piece that you feel like you can relate with- because you don't have much experience so it would be easier for you. I hope this helps. I don't think they care about if you have a lot of experience and if youre from a area that doesn't have many opportunities then just say that they'll feel sorry for you. plus the acting world is criticized for having too many middle- upper class kids than working class kids (like me ) soo yeah.
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    I got into the technical courses last year and I outright said I had very little experience. NYT isn't a drama school in the way you must have experience, it is there to explore your interests and give you a foothold. It is great, give it a go see what happens it won't hurt to try. And if you get in it could change your life, it changed mine.
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    I also did the technical course last year (Julesyet - which did you do? I did SM) but two of my friends got into the acting course.
    Both of them were 14/15 when they auditioned and hadn't really had any acting experience or audition practice - one girl had done basically nothing outside of school drama lessons, and the other had done one school play. I also know people who got in when they were 20/21, so age is no concern - they just want to give the best people opportunities. Just make sure you choose a monologue from a play you enjoy, and practice it in loads of different ways. Some people say not to do Shakespeare, but my friend did a monologue from Macbeth - just make sure you can really commit to the monologue. If you have enough passion and talent, that should come across in your monologue and make you stand out.
    Just don't choose a monologue from Blood Brothers - it's so overdone and will just bore the people auditioning you (unless you think you can do it a new and creative way, in which case, go for it!).

    As for the structure of the audition: in the morning, you'll take part in a workshop with up to 30 other people - doing different drama games, getting everyone comfortable with each other, and allowing the people auditioning you to get an idea of whether you would work well in ensemble work. Then you go off for lunch and come back for your 10-20 minute monologue slot. This is where everyone's experience is different. Some people are asked to repeat their monologue in a different way, some people are asked questions about the play, some are asked about why you want to join NYT, etc... As long as you know your monologue well and can talk about the play and theatre in general, you should do fine.
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    Hey!

    I auditioned this year (In January) and unfortunately didn't get in. I didn't have much experience either at that point, I'd only started actor training, doing a performing arts course at college, a few months beforehand. Almost 11 months on I feel a lot more confident, and I'm on the verge of Drama School Applications, and my next NYT audition in February!

    I had a mixed experience, I'm shy so had a bit of a hard time just talking to people as you're sort of expected to, which was a bit of a downer. I also picked a horrendous monologue, I'd advise to do a contemporary piece rather than a Shakespeare one. But overall the audition process is fairly relaxed, and good experience. I'd say that 100% you don't need experience in drama, it certainly does help because you'll be used to auditions, and a lot of the games and exercises they do in the three hour workshop will be things most people already know from drama classes and workshops - buuuuttttt the NYT is all about embracing performers of all levels of experience from different social and economical backgrounds no matter what training you've had.

    Luckily enough I've secured myself an audition at the same place as last time so I'll know the area haha! Hopefully we can all gain a place
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    Hey I applied last year too!
    It was my first time and I was only 14 so I wasn't surprised that I didn't get a place. I also didn't pick a great monologue, it was very slow and I didn't feel happy when I performed it. However, I did love the workshop and it's the most comfortable I've ever felt performing with people! I've booked my audition and am now choosing a monologue (for anyone interested, the monologue I chose last year was one of Leah's in DNA by Dennis Kelly. It's a good monologue but I don't think that I played it very well). I'm already really excited about auditions as I had such a positive experience last time!
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    (Original post by sparks154)
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    (Original post by robinfr)
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    Hi there,
    We were just browsing the forum and my colleague noticed this thread and just wanted to check you all knew there are replies here It's often best to quote people (by clicking the Reply button next to each post or the " quote mark button) then that person will get a notification to let them know you have replied
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    (Original post by charleave)
    I also did the technical course last year (Julesyet - which did you do? I did SM) but two of my friends got into the acting course.
    Both of them were 14/15 when they auditioned and hadn't really had any acting experience or audition practice - one girl had done basically nothing outside of school drama lessons, and the other had done one school play. I also know people who got in when they were 20/21, so age is no concern - they just want to give the best people opportunities. Just make sure you choose a monologue from a play you enjoy, and practice it in loads of different ways. Some people say not to do Shakespeare, but my friend did a monologue from Macbeth - just make sure you can really commit to the monologue. If you have enough passion and talent, that should come across in your monologue and make you stand out.
    Just don't choose a monologue from Blood Brothers - it's so overdone and will just bore the people auditioning you (unless you think you can do it a new and creative way, in which case, go for it!).

    As for the structure of the audition: in the morning, you'll take part in a workshop with up to 30 other people - doing different drama games, getting everyone comfortable with each other, and allowing the people auditioning you to get an idea of whether you would work well in ensemble work. Then you go off for lunch and come back for your 10-20 minute monologue slot. This is where everyone's experience is different. Some people are asked to repeat their monologue in a different way, some people are asked questions about the play, some are asked about why you want to join NYT, etc... As long as you know your monologue well and can talk about the play and theatre in general, you should do fine.

    Hi! I have an interview this year for the technical course and was just wondering if you could just tell me a little bit about the course/interview and the whole process? Thanks
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    (Original post by ceasha)
    Hi! I have an interview this year for the technical course and was just wondering if you could just tell me a little bit about the course/interview and the whole process? Thanks
    Hiya!

    Which technical course are you applying for? I did Stage Management so I can tell you the most about that course, but I had friends on the other courses so I can give you information about those too. In terms of the course beyond the training (i.e. evening or weekend activities, accommodation life), I can give you some information on that too if you want!

    The interview seemed a bit daunting at first, but Sam - my interviewer - was really nice and put me at ease quickly. The questions were things like how much I knew about stage management, what experience I had, whether I knew what I wanted to do after my GCSEs... To be honest, I don't remember much about my interview apart from the fact I rambled on too much, but I'm doing my ambassador training this weekend so I'll let you know more about it once I've done that!

    If you have any more questions about anything at all, don't hesitate to ask here or PM me!
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    (Original post by charleave)
    Hiya!

    Which technical course are you applying for? I did Stage Management so I can tell you the most about that course, but I had friends on the other courses so I can give you information about those too. In terms of the course beyond the training (i.e. evening or weekend activities, accommodation life), I can give you some information on that too if you want!

    The interview seemed a bit daunting at first, but Sam - my interviewer - was really nice and put me at ease quickly. The questions were things like how much I knew about stage management, what experience I had, whether I knew what I wanted to do after my GCSEs... To be honest, I don't remember much about my interview apart from the fact I rambled on too much, but I'm doing my ambassador training this weekend so I'll let you know more about it once I've done that!

    If you have any more questions about anything at all, don't hesitate to ask here or PM me!

    Hey! Thanks for getting back to me
    I am planning on doing the stage management course too so any information regarding what the course is like would be great! I haven't had a great amount of experience and I was wondering if this would set me back in anyway what soever? Also if I did get in (hopefully) I would to love know about the experience outside the actual course!
    Thanks
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    (Original post by ceasha)
    Hey! Thanks for getting back to me
    I am planning on doing the stage management course too so any information regarding what the course is like would be great! I haven't had a great amount of experience and I was wondering if this would set me back in anyway what soever? Also if I did get in (hopefully) I would to love know about the experience outside the actual course!
    Thanks
    WHOOO STAGE MANAGEMENT

    Okay, so basically, the course is the first year of drama school crammed into two weeks... plus extras.

    In the first week, you learn about the duties and responsibilities of Assistant Stage Managers and Deputy Stage Managers. You practice things like taping up the rehearsal room (actually so much harder than it sounds!) and doing scene changes. The second week is focused on the tech exercise, where you work with the LX & SND course to stage a short production.

    Every year the course is slightly different, but usually you'll have a prop-making workshop with Johnny B, a blood and stage violence workshop with RC-Annie, talks by various professionals (we had a talk by one of the most renowned UK show-callers - she does every Olympic games! - and another talk by the production manager of Miss Saigon), and backstage tours of theatres (we visited Matilda, Gypsy, and Secret Cinema). If you're over 16, Gareth - the course director and an absolute angel - will find you a work placement for one night during the course on a major West End show (this year, we had placements at Mamma Mia!, The Lion King, Beautiful, Les Miserables, and some others I can't remember), but these are not guaranteed. If you're under-16, like I was, Gareth is lovely and says that if you contact him once you're 16 he'll find you a work placement. Stage Management is also the best course because Gareth has so many contacts that you'll sometimes get free tickets for shows! The year before me got no tickets, but we got free tickets for Miss Saigon and Secret Cinema, so we were really lucky!

    Then there's obviously time outside of learning! I didn't stay in accommodation since I live twenty minutes from NYT, but I kind of regret that now - I'm not as close as I would be with some people on my course, and I only really talk to the people from my course who then did the REP with me... But accommodation is expensive. I spent the last two evenings at accommodation and then travelled home afterwards - if you live close enough to do that, it's a good way to get the full experience for a much lower cost. People would organise trips to the theatre in the evenings - I tagged along with the LX & SND course to try to get tickets for Everyman. Sunday is your day off, so if you can, organise something with people on your course!

    As for experience, they don't mind how much you have! They look for a passion for theatre and a willingness to learn. I had only stage managed a school show before I applied. Obviously there are people who get into the course and have loads of experience, but having little to no experience won't hold you back at all.

    Once you become a member, there are so many opportunities - especially for stage management. I started working on the NYT REP season (NYT's professional company which does a 10-week run in the West End) the week after my course finished, and I've been working there twice a week in the evenings after school. (We just closed last week - a very emotional time - but it's been absolutely incredible!) I've also got another job lined up for the holidays through NYT. Plus through the members board, we get access to free or discounted tickets to shows, which is always a bonus!
    Bear in mind though that I live in London, and a lot of opportunities outside of NYT shows are based in London, so your experience may be slightly less if you live outside of London. However, NYT does shows all over the country, so you're bound to get opportunities!

    Where are you doing your interview, if you don't mind me asking?
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    (Original post by charleave)
    WHOOO STAGE MANAGEMENT

    Okay, so basically, the course is the first year of drama school crammed into two weeks... plus extras.

    In the first week, you learn about the duties and responsibilities of Assistant Stage Managers and Deputy Stage Managers. You practice things like taping up the rehearsal room (actually so much harder than it sounds!) and doing scene changes. The second week is focused on the tech exercise, where you work with the LX & SND course to stage a short production.

    Every year the course is slightly different, but usually you'll have a prop-making workshop with Johnny B, a blood and stage violence workshop with RC-Annie, talks by various professionals (we had a talk by one of the most renowned UK show-callers - she does every Olympic games! - and another talk by the production manager of Miss Saigon), and backstage tours of theatres (we visited Matilda, Gypsy, and Secret Cinema). If you're over 16, Gareth - the course director and an absolute angel - will find you a work placement for one night during the course on a major West End show (this year, we had placements at Mamma Mia!, The Lion King, Beautiful, Les Miserables, and some others I can't remember), but these are not guaranteed. If you're under-16, like I was, Gareth is lovely and says that if you contact him once you're 16 he'll find you a work placement. Stage Management is also the best course because Gareth has so many contacts that you'll sometimes get free tickets for shows! The year before me got no tickets, but we got free tickets for Miss Saigon and Secret Cinema, so we were really lucky!

    Then there's obviously time outside of learning! I didn't stay in accommodation since I live twenty minutes from NYT, but I kind of regret that now - I'm not as close as I would be with some people on my course, and I only really talk to the people from my course who then did the REP with me... But accommodation is expensive. I spent the last two evenings at accommodation and then travelled home afterwards - if you live close enough to do that, it's a good way to get the full experience for a much lower cost. People would organise trips to the theatre in the evenings - I tagged along with the LX & SND course to try to get tickets for Everyman. Sunday is your day off, so if you can, organise something with people on your course!

    As for experience, they don't mind how much you have! They look for a passion for theatre and a willingness to learn. I had only stage managed a school show before I applied. Obviously there are people who get into the course and have loads of experience, but having little to no experience won't hold you back at all.

    Once you become a member, there are so many opportunities - especially for stage management. I started working on the NYT REP season (NYT's professional company which does a 10-week run in the West End) the week after my course finished, and I've been working there twice a week in the evenings after school. (We just closed last week - a very emotional time - but it's been absolutely incredible!) I've also got another job lined up for the holidays through NYT. Plus through the members board, we get access to free or discounted tickets to shows, which is always a bonus!
    Bear in mind though that I live in London, and a lot of opportunities outside of NYT shows are based in London, so your experience may be slightly less if you live outside of London. However, NYT does shows all over the country, so you're bound to get opportunities!

    Where are you doing your interview, if you don't mind me asking?


    Sadly I don't live near London so if all goes well it's going to cost me a hell of a lot I am auditioning in Birmingham in February!

    Thanks for all the information you've given me its a great help. I am really look forward to it now, just have to get past the interview first
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    (Original post by charleave)
    WHOOO STAGE MANAGEMENT

    Okay, so basically, the course is the first year of drama school crammed into two weeks... plus extras.

    In the first week, you learn about the duties and responsibilities of Assistant Stage Managers and Deputy Stage Managers. You practice things like taping up the rehearsal room (actually so much harder than it sounds!) and doing scene changes. The second week is focused on the tech exercise, where you work with the LX & SND course to stage a short production.

    Every year the course is slightly different, but usually you'll have a prop-making workshop with Johnny B, a blood and stage violence workshop with RC-Annie, talks by various professionals (we had a talk by one of the most renowned UK show-callers - she does every Olympic games! - and another talk by the production manager of Miss Saigon), and backstage tours of theatres (we visited Matilda, Gypsy, and Secret Cinema). If you're over 16, Gareth - the course director and an absolute angel - will find you a work placement for one night during the course on a major West End show (this year, we had placements at Mamma Mia!, The Lion King, Beautiful, Les Miserables, and some others I can't remember), but these are not guaranteed. If you're under-16, like I was, Gareth is lovely and says that if you contact him once you're 16 he'll find you a work placement. Stage Management is also the best course because Gareth has so many contacts that you'll sometimes get free tickets for shows! The year before me got no tickets, but we got free tickets for Miss Saigon and Secret Cinema, so we were really lucky!

    Then there's obviously time outside of learning! I didn't stay in accommodation since I live twenty minutes from NYT, but I kind of regret that now - I'm not as close as I would be with some people on my course, and I only really talk to the people from my course who then did the REP with me... But accommodation is expensive. I spent the last two evenings at accommodation and then travelled home afterwards - if you live close enough to do that, it's a good way to get the full experience for a much lower cost. People would organise trips to the theatre in the evenings - I tagged along with the LX & SND course to try to get tickets for Everyman. Sunday is your day off, so if you can, organise something with people on your course!

    As for experience, they don't mind how much you have! They look for a passion for theatre and a willingness to learn. I had only stage managed a school show before I applied. Obviously there are people who get into the course and have loads of experience, but having little to no experience won't hold you back at all.

    Once you become a member, there are so many opportunities - especially for stage management. I started working on the NYT REP season (NYT's professional company which does a 10-week run in the West End) the week after my course finished, and I've been working there twice a week in the evenings after school. (We just closed last week - a very emotional time - but it's been absolutely incredible!) I've also got another job lined up for the holidays through NYT. Plus through the members board, we get access to free or discounted tickets to shows, which is always a bonus!
    Bear in mind though that I live in London, and a lot of opportunities outside of NYT shows are based in London, so your experience may be slightly less if you live outside of London. However, NYT does shows all over the country, so you're bound to get opportunities!

    Where are you doing your interview, if you don't mind me asking?
    Hi I hope you don't mind me asking you some questions Charleave! I am also applying for the stage management course 2016! I don't have a lot of experience with stage management but I do GCSE Drama and I did the lighting / sound for my school musical this year! I live near Manchester, (that is where my interview is,) so I am going to have to pay for the accommodation like Ceasha! Do you know where the accommodation is and what it is like - is it in a campus? Also, would you tell us what the daily routine is for the course - is there activities in the evenings for the people who stay in the accommodation or are they just left to do there own thing? I am so glad I have found someone who is able to answer my questions
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    (Original post by ceasha)
    Sadly I don't live near London so if all goes well it's going to cost me a hell of a lot I am auditioning in Birmingham in February!

    Thanks for all the information you've given me its a great help. I am really look forward to it now, just have to get past the interview first
    Good luck! I'm sure you'll do great!
    And if you don't get in, reapply next year!

    (Original post by katiee_99)
    Hi I hope you don't mind me asking you some questions Charleave! I am also applying for the stage management course 2016! I don't have a lot of experience with stage management but I do GCSE Drama and I did the lighting / sound for my school musical this year! I live near Manchester, (that is where my interview is,) so I am going to have to pay for the accommodation like Ceasha! Do you know where the accommodation is and what it is like - is it in a campus? Also, would you tell us what the daily routine is for the course - is there activities in the evenings for the people who stay in the accommodation or are they just left to do there own thing? I am so glad I have found someone who is able to answer my questions
    Hi there! So many stage managers! I love it!
    (Oh my god I'm also doing GCSE Drama and we're in the middle of my final controlled assessment and I'm dying! How's it going for you?)
    The accommodation changes every year, I think? Last year it was apparently an hour away or something, but this year it was around 20-30 minutes? As far as I know, it's always university accommodation (they rent it out over holidays), so it'll be like student living - everyone has a room (as far as I know, always en suite) with a shared kitchen for around five rooms. They're quite nice rooms generally.
    The daily routine varies a lot, but generally you'll be at Holloway Road at 9:45 AM ready for a 10 AM start. There's a lunch break (which changes - sometimes you'll have an hour, sometimes only twenty minutes). You would finish sometime between 4 PM and 6 PM, depending on the day's activities. And if you have any backstage tours, you may have a later start because you'll meet at the theatre when the SM team arrives. The days tend not to overrun. We did have some people leaving a bit earlier on some days, but that was because they had to be at their work placement at a certain time.
    In the evenings, you're left to do your own thing, but most people hang out in communal areas or visit London (and go to the theatre!). Again, this is where the SM course is the best (I'm definitely not biased ) because for one of your evenings you will probably be shadowing the SM team on a West End show, so that would be the only planned activity really. Because the tech courses are small, the curfew was decent - 10 PM for under-18s and 11 PM for over-18s, if I remember correctly? And if you wanted to extend it (usually because a show was finishing later), the course assistants would usually be okay to extend the curfew. They couldn't go to bed until everyone was back though.
    You do get a lot of independence - you need to be able to cook your own meals, and travel around London by yourself (though the course assistant will accompany you to and from venues like Holloway Road). It's not like a summer camp where every second of your day is planned from the moment you wake up to the moment you go to sleep. I personally loved that aspect of the course, because I was treated like an adult and could choose how to spend my time, but there are some people I know who would have struggled immensely. If you got in, you would probably be one of the youngest on the course. However (beyond safety regulations like curfew), you are treated exactly the same as anyone else, which can be great if you can cope with that, but not so great if you lack the maturity to be given the freedom and responsibilities of an over-18yo.

    EDIT: It seems that the tech courses this year are three weeks long and will take place at Rose Bruford! The first week will be spent exploring the other tech disciplines, but then the course should run the same as it did for me.
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    Im doing an acting audition!
    Also i'm 19 and have practically zero real acting experience, similar to OP i didnt have many opportunities at school and had alot of personal problems that stopped me from doing much in that respect, even though id heard of NYT i never really thought i could try.
    But now im at uni! And theatre is literally EVERYWHERE and my whole perspective's changed, im actually in a play for the first time and am auditioning for more and more, its so fun!
    So i finally booked my audition for the 16th of february, does anyone have any monologue tips? All the good ones seem to be for middle aged characters with accents :') ive heard not to bother with accents though and i should maybe stick to characters closer to my age?
    Im feeling strangely confident about the workshop bit, im so excited! Anyone else going to london on the 16th??
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    (Original post by FuzzingSas)
    Im doing an acting audition!
    Also i'm 19 and have practically zero real acting experience, similar to OP i didnt have many opportunities at school and had alot of personal problems that stopped me from doing much in that respect, even though id heard of NYT i never really thought i could try.
    But now im at uni! And theatre is literally EVERYWHERE and my whole perspective's changed, im actually in a play for the first time and am auditioning for more and more, its so fun!
    So i finally booked my audition for the 16th of february, does anyone have any monologue tips? All the good ones seem to be for middle aged characters with accents :' ive heard not to bother with accents though and i should maybe stick to characters closer to my age?
    Im feeling strangely confident about the workshop bit, im so excited! Anyone else going to london on the 16th??
    I'm also 19 and in exactly the same position as you!

    I'm auditioning in London 16th Feb as well, whereabouts?
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    I'm 16 and I've just booked an audition in Norwich on 20th Feb as a very spontaneous thing! I haven't done acting in a couple of years but I've recently realised my interest of getting into the world of theatre and film, whether it be acting, writing, or directing. I'm not usually a confident person but I feel like something like this is the right thing to build up my confidence, because it'll be amongst like minded strangers and I'm aware that I have nothing to lose (apart from £42).
    Anyone with previous experience at these auditions, should I expect a huge number of other people to be there? And what's the morning workshop like?
    Also, I've been given an audition time in the afternoon, will this be the time when I do a chosen monologue? I'm really not sure what sort of monologue to choose. Is it expected to choose a monologue from theatre or would a monologue from a film or TV be acceptable?
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    (Original post by lovegoodjpg)
    I'm 16 and I've just booked an audition in Norwich on 20th Feb as a very spontaneous thing! I haven't done acting in a couple of years but I've recently realised my interest of getting into the world of theatre and film, whether it be acting, writing, or directing. I'm not usually a confident person but I feel like something like this is the right thing to build up my confidence, because it'll be amongst like minded strangers and I'm aware that I have nothing to lose (apart from £42).
    Anyone with previous experience at these auditions, should I expect a huge number of other people to be there? And what's the morning workshop like?
    Also, I've been given an audition time in the afternoon, will this be the time when I do a chosen monologue? I'm really not sure what sort of monologue to choose. Is it expected to choose a monologue from theatre or would a monologue from a film or TV be acceptable?
    Didn't realise you posted in the 2016 one as well! Oops.

    To answer more of your questions...

    1. Numbers of people depends entirely on venue and place I'd expect. It was me and at least 35 others at one of the London auditions last year. 20-40 is about right.

    2. Morning workshop is great fun. You play Drama Games, take part in movement exercises (using the space effectively), you may have a group singing/voice activity, you'll do some work in pairs (concentration, working together), and you'll likely do a group improvisation, in which the NYT people will provide a certain setting/scene/theme for you and others.

    3. Your audition time is the time you perform your monologue and have your interview. Turn up to this 10-15 minutes early, others will be waiting around with you, gives you a good chance to chat and calm yourself before you go in (although there's nothing to worry about!)

    4. Contemporary Monologue, in my opinion.

    5. Definitely a monologue from a published play, not film or TV.

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    (Original post by PAStudent1996)
    Didn't realise you posted in the 2016 one as well! Oops.

    To answer more of your questions...

    1. Numbers of people depends entirely on venue and place I'd expect. It was me and at least 35 others at one of the London auditions last year. 20-40 is about right.

    2. Morning workshop is great fun. You play Drama Games, take part in movement exercises (using the space effectively), you may have a group singing/voice activity, you'll do some work in pairs (concentration, working together), and you'll likely do a group improvisation, in which the NYT people will provide a certain setting/scene/theme for you and others.

    3. Your audition time is the time you perform your monologue and have your interview. Turn up to this 10-15 minutes early, others will be waiting around with you, gives you a good chance to chat and calm yourself before you go in (although there's nothing to worry about!)

    4. Contemporary Monologue, in my opinion.

    5. Definitely a monologue from a published play, not film or TV.

    Thanks for all your responses! I've answered some of these questions myself by now but this is still a great help, you're fab!
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    (Original post by FuzzingSas)
    Im doing an acting audition!
    Also i'm 19 and have practically zero real acting experience, similar to OP i didnt have many opportunities at school and had alot of personal problems that stopped me from doing much in that respect, even though id heard of NYT i never really thought i could try.
    But now im at uni! And theatre is literally EVERYWHERE and my whole perspective's changed, im actually in a play for the first time and am auditioning for more and more, its so fun!
    So i finally booked my audition for the 16th of february, does anyone have any monologue tips? All the good ones seem to be for middle aged characters with accents :' ive heard not to bother with accents though and i should maybe stick to characters closer to my age?
    Im feeling strangely confident about the workshop bit, im so excited! Anyone else going to london on the 16th??
    Wow thanks for all the responses folks! I'd forgotten about this thread and then remembered and it was a pleasant suprise Re: FuzzingSas I'm so relieved to hear of someone in a similar position! I've watched a lot of videos about people's experiences and read up a lot and it seems like the two biggest things are to completely avoid accents and pick a character that you could actually be cast as, so around your age would be good though if your appearance suggests you could play older or younger you could also do that. You just have to be able to justify why you chose the monologue and why it's a good fit for you! Hope your audition goes well on the 16th! Not long to go now
 
 
 
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Updated: February 19, 2017
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