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    If someone does not do A-level in Economics, would that disadvantage them at uni in the sense that it would be harder for them to cope with the work in comparison to someone who did do it?
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    (Original post by MaliBoy123)
    If someone does not do A-level in Economics, would that disadvantage them at uni in the sense that it would be harder for them to cope with the work in comparison to someone who did do it?
    No, it's not even a requirement.

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    No, don't worry about not doing A-level economics.

    A-level economics is IMO a mixed blessing. The best thing about it is as a test of interest for the student ie if you do A-level economics and really like it and want to do more then you know economics is going to be for you. But the problem with A-level is it covers a lot of topics but in very basic detail and skips out a lot of the important principles. This leads to some undergraduate students who have done A-level economics being lazy and complacent in their first year especially, thinking "I've seen this topic before" and not realising that they get taught it properly at university. So they still have an "A-level answer" mentality at university and they don't do that well.

    I think for students considering doing their A-levels, if you think you might be interested in economics and it is available to you to study then why not go for it. But if you are already doing A-levels, not doing economics and want to do it at university, don't worry about the absence of A-level at all. Tutors will probably find you easier to teach as you will be a blank slate learning things properly the first time.

    A-levels are a bit of a bugbear of mine because I've seen some A-level questions and thought actually that's quite similar to a 2nd year undergraduate question, and then seen the A-level mark scheme and thought wtf that just doesn't have any of the real important points in it!
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    (Original post by MagicNMedicine)
    No, don't worry about not doing A-level economics.

    A-level economics is IMO a mixed blessing. The best thing about it is as a test of interest for the student ie if you do A-level economics and really like it and want to do more then you know economics is going to be for you. But the problem with A-level is it covers a lot of topics but in very basic detail and skips out a lot of the important principles. This leads to some undergraduate students who have done A-level economics being lazy and complacent in their first year especially, thinking "I've seen this topic before" and not realising that they get taught it properly at university. So they still have an "A-level answer" mentality at university and they don't do that well.

    I think for students considering doing their A-levels, if you think you might be interested in economics and it is available to you to study then why not go for it. But if you are already doing A-levels, not doing economics and want to do it at university, don't worry about the absence of A-level at all. Tutors will probably find you easier to teach as you will be a blank slate learning things properly the first time.

    A-levels are a bit of a bugbear of mine because I've seen some A-level questions and thought actually that's quite similar to a 2nd year undergraduate question, and then seen the A-level mark scheme and thought wtf that just doesn't have any of the real important points in it!
    Thank you for the detailed answer. Where do you study at currently? Also does all the topics covered in A level micro and macro , get re learned at uni or are some topics irrelevant and not in the uni syllabus?
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    Maths is more important than Economics, imo.
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    (Original post by Airfairy)
    Maths is more important than Economics, imo.
    No way!!!!!!
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    (Original post by MaliBoy123)
    No way!!!!!!
    If you want to do a BSc in Economics as opposed to a BA you'll struggle without A-Level Maths. I have an A grade in GCSE and A-Level Economics, yet no Maths A-Level. I dropped out of my Economics degree because I just couldn't handle the maths. They shouldn't have let me on the course to start with. They were just taking for granted that I had two years worth of knowledge that wasn't there. Plus, when you start Econometrics in second year it only gets worse.
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    (Original post by Airfairy)
    If you want to do a BSc in Economics as opposed to a BA you'll struggle without A-Level Maths. I have an A grade in GCSE and A-Level Economics, yet no Maths A-Level. I dropped out of my Economics degree because I just couldn't handle the maths. They shouldn't have let me on the course to start with. They were just taking for granted that I had two years worth of knowledge that wasn't there. Plus, when you start Econometrics in second year it only gets worse.
    Do you reckon fmaths is vital as well? And what uni did u go to?
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    (Original post by MaliBoy123)
    Do you reckon fmaths is vital as well? And what uni did u go to?
    Nah I don't think you need further maths to be able to hack BSc Economics.

    I went to Liverpool for a year to do Economics.
 
 
 
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