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What are my chances of getting onto Foundation Medicine? watch

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    Always wanted to do Medicine but performed so badly at GCSE I just don't know any more and I definietly do NOT meet the requirements for the regular A100 Medicine Year 1 Entry.

    So I have been looking at PreMedical Years / Year 0 / Foundation / Year 1 of BSc and then transferring to Medicine.

    My GCSE results are as follows:
    -A in ICT
    -BB in Language and Literature.
    -B in Science (only did Unit 1 Core)
    -C in Maths.
    -2 Cs, D and an E.

    For A Level I am doing
    -Biology
    -English Literature
    -ICT
    -General Studies

    I’m not doing Chemistry. I haven’t been given any predicted grades but I guess I’d like to get an A in both ICT and General Studies as they’re pretty easy subjects (however, most unis don’t accept GenStud). At least B grades in English Lit and Biology.

    My chances are pretty low, should I just give up and look for something else (Biomedical Science?) or should I try and nail the A Levels, get a high UKCAT and go for it?!
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    I'm pretty much in the same situation - ABBCCCC at GCSE (due to a year off in hospital) and I've taken all humanities subjects for A-Level, having pretty much resigned myself to the fact that I'd never get into medicine! (Until I discovered the joys of Foundation years!)
    But if it's something you really want to do, go for it! Try and nail the A-Levels and UKCAT,get some work experience under your belt and go for it. Foundation years are a good start and honestly, if it's something you really want and don't try to get you may regret it. Best of luck!
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    (Original post by corstejo)
    I'm pretty much in the same situation - ABBCCCC at GCSE (due to a year off in hospital) and I've taken all humanities subjects for A-Level, having pretty much resigned myself to the fact that I'd never get into medicine! (Until I discovered the joys of Foundation years!)
    But if it's something you really want to do, go for it! Try and nail the A-Levels and UKCAT,get some work experience under your belt and go for it. Foundation years are a good start and honestly, if it's something you really want and don't try to get you may regret it. Best of luck!
    Thank you so much! Good luck to you as well!!!
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    Posted from TSR Mobile

    Good chance.You have the profile of a foundation med applicant.Focus on getting good grades at A level,a strong extracurricular profile and smash the UKCAT.
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    (Original post by Kadak)
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    Good chance.You have the profile of a foundation med applicant.Focus on getting good grades at A level,a strong extracurricular profile and smash the UKCAT.
    Thank you!

    Can you give me some examples of extracurricular - I'm thinking of taking up violin or piano, but I don't really know!!
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    (Original post by maggiedavies)
    Thank you!

    Can you give me some examples of extracurricular - I'm thinking of taking up violin or piano, but I don't really know!!


    Posted from TSR Mobile

    OK.
    No,don't.That's a huge mistake.There's no point taking up musical instruments just to impress a interviewer UNLESS you can relate that to how it makes you a good doctor or helps with some of the skills.

    Things like being part of a medical organisation like Red Cross,St John,volunteering in care homes /hospitals/hospices,doing social activities like sports teams,head boy/head girl,representing your school etc.

    The key is to justify how any extracurricular activities makes you a better doctor or gives you the skills need as one.

    It's not the quantity or quality that matters,but how you can relate it.Some people have done placements at many hospitals and haven't got a place while some have only volunteered at a care home and got in.It's because they could relate and link what they did with medicine better.

    You also need to have a realistic view of medicine e.g. realise that some of your patients will die and you can't save everyone.
    You must be able to make difficult decisions.
    A classic one is
    "A hiv patient comes in.He going to sleep with his wife unprotected. Now you don't want that to happen but because of patient doctor confidentiality, what do you do? ".
    Or
    "You have a 39 year old alcoholic,a 15 year old aids and a eighty old woman. You have only one dialysis machine.Who do you save? "
    Hopes this helps.
    *Any medical students pls go easy on me if I made a mistake .
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    (Original post by Kadak)
    Posted from TSR Mobile

    OK.
    No,don't.That's a huge mistake.There's no point taking up musical instruments just to impress a interviewer UNLESS you can relate that to how it makes you a good doctor or helps with some of the skills.

    Things like being part of a medical organisation like Red Cross,St John,volunteering in care homes /hospitals/hospices,doing social activities like sports teams,head boy/head girl,representing your school etc.

    The key is to justify how any extracurricular activities makes you a better doctor or gives you the skills need as one.

    It's not the quantity or quality that matters,but how you can relate it.Some people have done placements at many hospitals and haven't got a place while some have only volunteered at a care home and got in.It's because they could relate and link what they did with medicine better.

    You also need to have a realistic view of medicine e.g. realise that some of your patients will die and you can't save everyone.
    You must be able to make difficult decisions.
    A classic one is
    "A hiv patient comes in.He going to sleep with his wife unprotected. Now you don't want that to happen but because of patient doctor confidentiality, what do you do? ".
    Or
    "You have a 39 year old alcoholic,a 15 year old aids and a eighty old woman. You have only one dialysis machine.Who do you save? "
    Hopes this helps.
    *Any medical students pls go easy on me if I made a mistake .
    Ah I see what you mean. Thanks a lot - I volunteered at the local hospital for about a month over the summer and will probably do more next summer. I might also try and shadow some doctors and GPs as well.
 
 
 
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