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Have you interviewed anyone before? watch

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    Have you?

    What's the best and worst so far? What do you look for when interviewing a candidate?
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    Yes, I've interviewed and/or recruited people at the companies I've worked at.

    Before I even consider inviting them for an interview, I read through their CV, taking note of who they've worked for and how relevant their experience is for the role. As I work in design, specifically in e-commerce, it's beneficial if they've worked for a similar company and certainly in the same sector. This normally suggests that they're familiar with how things work beforehand, even if it'll be slightly different at their past place of work.

    In a similar vein to their experience, if their portfolio of work is highly relevant to the type of work they'd be producing on the job, it obviously helps a lot. However, none of this is paramount and I could easily invite someone who has worked in design, but not in this sector. There's transferrable skills, either way, and if they have a strong portfolio, they can easily adapt once on the job.

    If I've invited them to an interview, they've already passed the first stage of having the satisfactory amount of experience for the role and their portfolio has demonstrated that they have the skill set required. The interview itself is mainly to determine who they are as a person and whether they'd fit in with the rest of the team. As a manager, it's incredibly important to make sure you're recruiting someone who will likely get on with everyone else. Moreover, the interview gives me the opportunity to gauge their interest in the role and why they want to work for us. I can also probe deeper on their past experiences by going through their CV and portfolio and allowing them to elaborate.

    In some cases, this is all I need to make my decision. However, if their position is more senior, a second interview with other members of staff who they will be working with or for will normally be necessary, either with myself in attendance or with them separately. At one company, someone from HR was always present and trial days were needed. The latter would simply require them to sit down with the team for a day and I would ask for feedback from the team at the end of the day once they've left. It also gives the person a chance to see what it's like to work at the company as well.
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    (Original post by Aiko)
    Yes, I've interviewed and/or recruited people at the companies I've worked at.

    Before I even consider inviting them for an interview, I read through their CV, taking note of who they've worked for and how relevant their experience is for the role. As I work in design, specifically in e-commerce, it's beneficial if they've worked for a similar company and certainly in the same sector. This normally suggests that they're familiar with how things work beforehand, even if it'll be slightly different at their past place of work.

    In a similar vein to their experience, if their portfolio of work is highly relevant to the type of work they'd be producing on the job, it obviously helps a lot. However, none of this is paramount and I could easily invite someone who has worked in design, but not in this sector. There's transferrable skills, either way, and if they have a strong portfolio, they can easily adapt once on the job.

    If I've invited them to an interview, they've already passed the first stage of having the satisfactory amount of experience for the role and their portfolio has demonstrated that they have the skill set required. The interview itself is mainly to determine who they are as a person and whether they'd fit in with the rest of the team. As a manager, it's incredibly important to make sure you're recruiting someone who will likely get on with everyone else. Moreover, the interview gives me the opportunity to gauge their interest in the role and why they want to work for us. I can also probe deeper on their past experiences by going through their CV and portfolio and allowing them to elaborate.

    In some cases, this is all I need to make my decision. However, if their position is more senior, a second interview with other members of staff who they will be working with or for will normally be necessary, either with myself in attendance or with them separately. At one company, someone from HR was always present and trial days were needed. The latter would simply require them to sit down with the team for a day and I would ask for feedback from the team at the end of the day once they've left. It also gives the person a chance to see what it's like to work at the company as well.
    why do some employers reject people post interview by saying the person we've hired had more experience? is that a cover for just not liking them?
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    (Original post by jelly1000)
    why do some employers reject people post interview by saying the person we've hired had more experience? is that a cover for just not liking them?
    I'll start by saying that every employer, or more precisely, interviewer is different. Although generalisations can be made, it can be down to a number of reasons as to why someone is unsuccessful post interview.

    As to whether the reason they give is true or not, it's highly unlikely an employer/interviewer will ever explicitly say they disliked someone. At the very least, they would say someone more 'suitable' was chosen. However, it's expected that more than one person will apply for the role, so it's not uncommon that someone with more experience might have gotten the job instead. That doesn't mean the person with less experience was not in contention for the role, they certainly were, otherwise they wouldn't have invited them for an interview, but perhaps they let themselves down at the interview stage for whatever reason. Experience accounts for a lot, we all know this, but it's possible that someone with a less impressive CV can still get the job if they nail the interview, and this could simply be down to their presentation and how they described their past experiences.

    I'll end on something that I'll never forget. One of my own line managers was recruiting for a new role. He spent a good few weeks interviewing people. Then, all of a sudden, someone in the team mentioned that their friend would be interested in the role, so my line manager said that they should come in for an interview. You could tell, just from that exchange, that he was planning to recruit this person's friend from his facial expression, regardless of how the interview went. It was almost like an unspoken acknowledgement that their friend will likely get it. My line manager liked this person in the team, so he was more than happy to recruit their friend. So, all of these people who had an interview were essentially getting shafted, but that's how it goes. The adage 'it's who you know, not what you know' couldn't be any truer in this case. I'm sure he gave all of the people who came for an interview a good reason too, such as recruiting someone else with more experience.
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    (Original post by jelly1000)
    why do some employers reject people post interview by saying the person we've hired had more experience? is that a cover for just not liking them?
    Just because someone has a satisfactory amount of experience doesn't mean the employer isn't going to prefer someone with even more experience.
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    (Original post by Aiko)
    I'll start by saying that every employer, or more precisely, interviewer is different. Although generalisations can be made, it can be down to a number of reasons as to why someone is unsuccessful post interview.

    As to whether the reason they give is true or not, it's highly unlikely an employer/interviewer will ever explicitly say they disliked someone. At the very least, they would say someone more 'suitable' was chosen. However, it's expected that more than one person will apply for the role, so it's not uncommon that someone with more experience might have gotten the job instead. That doesn't mean the person with less experience was not in contention for the role, they certainly were, otherwise they wouldn't have invited them for an interview, but perhaps they let themselves down at the interview stage for whatever reason. Experience accounts for a lot, we all know this, but it's possible that someone with a less impressive CV can still get the job if they nail the interview, and this could simply be down to their presentation and how they described their past experiences.

    I'll end on something that I'll never forget. One of my own line managers was recruiting for a new role. He spent a good few weeks interviewing people. Then, all of a sudden, someone in the team mentioned that their friend would be interested in the role, so my line manager said that they should come in for an interview. You could tell, just from that exchange, that he was planning to recruit this person's friend from his facial expression, regardless of how the interview went. It was almost like an unspoken acknowledgement that their friend will likely get it. My line manager liked this person in the team, so he was more than happy to recruit their friend. So, all of these people who had an interview were essentially getting shafted, but that's how it goes. The adage 'it's who you know, not what you know' couldn't be any truer in this case. I'm sure he gave all of the people who came for an interview a good reason too, such as recruiting someone else with more experience.
    (Original post by threeportdrift)
    Just because someone has a satisfactory amount of experience doesn't mean the employer isn't going to prefer someone with even more experience.
    Thanks guys, interesting insights. Really wish I knew someone at the sort of places I'm looking for work in.
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    (Original post by kka25)
    Have you?

    What's the best and worst so far? What do you look for when interviewing a candidate?
    Any relevant past experience. What their long-term plan is career-wise. Going through the various technologies that they'll be involved in and how they can contribute with their experience. Examples of projects/work that they've carried out. Their personality is also major factor. A few tests to make sure they can do what they claim to, it also helps to assess where they excel and where they'll need to improve.

    If all goes well, the interview stage means we're ready to hire them unless their personality screws it up or any discrepancies are uncovered.... or nepotism (it does happen but the candidate will be given a standard response).

    There's a lot more to it, it varies between candidates, it's not black and white.
 
 
 
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