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People who call others 'intelligent' watch

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    This grates me. All the time I hear people saying 'he/she is/isn't intelligent'. 'I was at this conference and I met this guy and he is really intelligent' or something like this.

    I just find it very egotistical. Who are you to be saying someone is or isn't intelligent? How do you define intelligence tangibly? You can't. There's so much generalisation of this word and unless you pertain to be a certain way, you are likely to not be deemed as intelligent or something.

    I like to refer to people for what I can see in them - I see people as capable, enthusiastic, creative, driven, hard working but just to lamely see in a conversation that he or she is or isn't intelligent - what are you actually saying? What are you basing it on? Many people base this on conversation. I was watching a video on here just 5 minutes ago where someone posted 'he is clearly intelligent' and I don't understand what it was based on.

    I just feel that and this may be a weird thing to say, but it has become a social or status norm to refer to specific people or render yourself as intelligent than others for some unknown reason. Sometimes in groups there is a mutual understanding that someone is not so intelligent, for no reason of substance other than maybe that person might have misunderstood something or not known something.

    I was talking to a friend recently who said he couldn't believe that someone got into an assessment centre ahead of him because he wasn't intelligent (words to that effect) and in my mind I thought - who are you? What do you know about how intelligent they are. Another time I was with a couple of guys I had just met and a friend and one of the guys said 'I know I look stupid but I'm not' and my friend laughed. Inside I thought .. who is this idiot? Why does he think he is smart? Because he is studying a Business undergraduate degree? I don't get it. Why is he so sure of himself.

    Why do people do this as if they are supreme beings or something? It's such a snobby way to talk about people in my opinion and it paints a bad picture of the person who always talks like this.
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    You are definitely blowing this out of proportion.

    First thing to remember is that intelligence is a relative term, so when someone says someone is intelligent or not intelligent, they are saying they consider that person intelligent or not intelligent relative to some standard - typically either themselves, or what they consider to be average intelligence (within that context).

    It seems your anger is directed at people that make comments about other people's intelligence as if it's an objective fact, but given intelligence is an entirely relative term, and a term that only has meaning within a context, by definition there is no such thing as objective intelligence or lack thereof.

    So calling someone intelligent or stupid, relative to yourself or some percevied standard of intelligence, can be a valid statement. Ofc there is no way for us to complwtely know the intelligence of anyone other than ourselves, but intelligence is for the most part observable. For example, some students in a class may ask more complex and sophisticated questions than others, and so it is fair to say they are more intelligent, at least within that context.


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    (Original post by VergeofInsanity)
    This grates me. All the time I hear people saying 'he/she is/isn't intelligent'. 'I was at this conference and I met this guy and he is really intelligent' or something like this.

    I just find it very egotistical. Who are you to be saying someone is or isn't intelligent? How do you define intelligence tangibly? You can't. There's so much generalisation of this word and unless you pertain to be a certain way, you are likely to not be deemed as intelligent or something.

    I like to refer to people for what I can see in them - I see people as capable, enthusiastic, creative, driven, hard working but just to lamely see in a conversation that he or she is or isn't intelligent - what are you actually saying? What are you basing it on? Many people base this on conversation. I was watching a video on here just 5 minutes ago where someone posted 'he is clearly intelligent' and I don't understand what it was based on.

    I just feel that and this may be a weird thing to say, but it has become a social or status norm to refer to specific people or render yourself as intelligent than others for some unknown reason. Sometimes in groups there is a mutual understanding that someone is not so intelligent, for no reason of substance other than maybe that person might have misunderstood or something or not known something.

    I was talking to a friend recently who said he couldn't believe that someone got into an assessment centre ahead of him because he wasn't intelligent (words to that effect) and in my mind I thought - who are you? What do you know about how intelligent they are. Another time I was with a couple of guys I had just met and a friend and one of the guys said 'I know I look stupid but I'm not' and my friend laughed. Inside I thought .. who is this idiot? Why does he think he is smart? Because he is studying a Business undergraduate degree? I don't get it. Why is he so sure of himself.

    Why do people do this as if they are supreme beings or something? It's such a snobbery way to talk about people in my opinion and it paints a bad picture of the person who always talks like this.
    lol
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    (Original post by MAINE.)
    You are definitely blowing this out of proportion.

    First thing to remember is that intelligence is a relative term, so when someone says someone is intelligent or not intelligent, they are saying they consider that person intelligent or not intelligent relative to some standard - typically either themselves, or what they consider to be average intelligence (within that context).

    It seems your anger is directed at people that make comments about other people's intelligence as if it's an objective fact, but given intelligence is an entirely relative term, and a term that only has meaning within a context, by definition there is no such thing as objective intelligence or lack thereof.

    So calling someone intelligent or stupid, relative to yourself or some percevied standard of intelligence, can be a valid statement. Ofc there is no way for us to complwtely know the intelligence of anyone other than ourselves, but intelligence is for the most part observable. For example, some students in a class may ask more complex and sophisticated questions than others, and so it is fair to say they are more intelligent, at least within that context.


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    But those sophisticated questions doesn't reflect solely on intelligence. That's exactly my point. It could be education, which is different to that of intelligence.

    When I went to uni I went in without taking A Level Maths - and guess what? My course required A Level Maths knowledge. That meant I was playing catch up whilst most others were able to keep the pace. So by your definition I would be deemed unintelligent relative to that situation. That's an example of misinterpretation of intelligence.
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    (Original post by Ecconomist)
    lol
    come at me brah - i'll fill your a r s e h o l e with my load
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    (Original post by VergeofInsanity)
    come at me brah - i'll fill your a r s e h o l e with my load
    someone's on the VergeofInsanity I see lol
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    (Original post by ImNotReallyMe)
    someone's on the VergeofInsanity I see lol
    don't get jealous love lol
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    Calm down it's just a word. No-one needs to get hurt here >.>
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    When people say he/she is intelligent they generally are referring to their own subjective definition of intelligence, just as with most opinions people make. I don't see it as egotistical at all, just typical, slightly flawed, human judgement making.
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    (Original post by Student403)
    Calm down it's just a word. No-one needs to get hurt here >.>
    who said anything about anyone getting hurt? I was raising a debate.
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    Yeah. That's the problem with judging people's intelligence. But what are you going to do? Make no judgment at all? Human beings aren't like that.You're blowing this out of proportion as well. It's not a scientifically backed up study of someone's brain that results in them being labelled 'intelligent'. It's just a throwaway comment.And also, everyone knows knowledge doesn't necessarily equal intelligence. I judge intelligence on how quickly people can pick things up (like a new skill). That may not be very scientific but I'm not trying to be scientific
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    (Original post by black_mamba)
    When people say he/she is intelligent they generally are referring to their own subjective definition of intelligence, just as with most opinions people make. I don't see it as egotistical at all, just typical, slightly flawed, human judgement making.
    but what is intelligence based on? you might say someone is creative or entrepreunerial because they come up with ideas or interesting methods. Maybe they are capable because they do well at whatever they do or perhaps demonstrate great drive or ambition. Perhaps they are academically brilliant, technically speaking. Maybe someone's knowledge is impressive - implying a good education.

    But intelligence? I mean it is such an intangible word that encompasses such a wide and deep emphasis that to just lash it out it at people in judgement, is in my opinion arrogant.
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    (Original post by VergeofInsanity)
    but what is intelligence based on? you might say someone is creative or entrepreunerial because they come up with ideas or interesting methods. Maybe they are capable because they do well at whatever they do or perhaps demonstrate great drive or ambition. Perhaps they are academically brilliant, technically speaking. Maybe someone's knowledge is impressive - implying a good education.

    But intelligence? I mean it is such an intangible word that encompasses such a wide and deep emphasis that to just lash it out it at people in judgement, is in my opinion arrogant.
    You said it yourself. It encompasses a wide and deep emphasis, so wouldn't that mean it's fine to use in many respects?
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    It's human nature to make quick judgements of people - if someone walks into a coffee shop, everyone looks to see who they are, not because we care but because we need to see if they're a threat. We make instant judgements - it's part of our nature. It's easier to put people into generalized boxes quickly for our own sake, than to over analyse their characteristics. Morally, I'm not saying it's right - but it's just a fact that it's what we do.
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    (Original post by Student403)
    You said it yourself. It encompasses a wide and deep emphasis, so wouldn't that mean it's fine to use in many respects?
    Not in my opinion, no.

    I just get the feeling alot of people who use this word see themselves as successful but have achieved very little if anything themself.

    Perhaps that is what grates me - as opposed to people later in life who have achieved something.
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    Your focusing on educational values of intelligence.
    Everything is relative to itself and externally to everthying else, someone will call you dumb to show how they feel relative to you from what they have seen. Just ignore it. You will never know how intelligent someone is or any adjective. Its just impossible to see into another persons mind and see how they feel, what they do, how it feels.

    To give values to people is to show your opinion and like any opinion they hold little value.
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    (Original post by VergeofInsanity)
    I just get the feeling alot of people who use this word see themselves as successful but have achieved very little if anything themself.
    That is quite common amongst young people who do well in education.

    Some of them I bet will be bitter about the sorts of people who drop out of school and go on to do well in life (because they struggle to understand that formal education isn't the only way to gain knowledge).

    The other thing is that achievements in themselves are not necessarily the most reliable judge of intelligence. Outcomes in life are based on a complex combo of hard work, smarts, and luck (opportunities, the advantages you were born into etc.)

    Personally the only sure fire way to gauge someone's intelligence (according to my definition) is to see that person react to a wide range of situations over a long period of time - and that's just not practical.
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    (Original post by VergeofInsanity)
    But those sophisticated questions doesn't reflect solely on intelligence. That's exactly my point. It could be education, which is different to that of intelligence.

    When I went to uni I went in without taking A Level Maths - and guess what? My course required A Level Maths knowledge. That meant I was playing catch up whilst most others were able to keep the pace. So by your definition I would be deemed unintelligent relative to that situation. That's an example of misinterpretation of intelligence.
    Well, yes, you would be less intelligent than others in the context of mathematical understanding.

    But I think the point you're making is that "intelligence" is separate from "knowledge", i.e. knowledge being just knowing certain facts, whereas intelligence is something beyond that, perhaps how that knowledge is applied?

    I think that has some merit, but I don't think you can completely separate intelligence from knowledge like that, because intelligence is not possible without knowledge.
 
 
 
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