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    And why?
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    I guess the best way, at least for me, to show how it's wrong is through examples:
    Take Muslim women in hijab for example, many people say that the women who wear hijab have no "freedom" and that covering their hair is "backwards", even if it's the women's own decision to cover their hair... BUT when Khloe Kardashian visited Dubai and took a selfie of her in niqab (only her eyes were seen) the majority of comments towards her appropriating the hijab were "wooow *heart eye emoji*".
    In Rastafarian culture and (not to sound racist, just simply stating a race) black culture (I guess), some men and women choose to get weaves and/or dreads.. I've seen my own friend get made fun of for having a weave... Just telling her that her hair is nasty and to clean it and that it's fake (which it is, but...) but I've also seen (white) girls wear weaves/dreads and be complimented for it???
    Another example would be the bindi women wear on their foreheads in Indian/Hindu culture. According to the internet, the general significance of the bindi is supposed to show that the women wearing it (a red bindi) is married. People sometimes make fun of this symbol and call it weird and not modern, however if a woman from another culture were to wear the bindi, just for fun, people would be like "nice!"
    It's not fair for the people from the cultures which are mocked to be criticized for sticking to their culture and way of life when people from other cultures are praised for looking so beautiful in these styles. But also, I've seen women who find these cultures amazing and respect the cultures, etc. which is more like cultural appreciation. Angelina Jolie went to Pakistan a while back and wore the hijab while she was there, it wasn't to show to the media "hey look how hot I am in this hijab" it was to respect Muslim culture (as well as the religion.) I don't know if this helped but this is my reasoning as to why I believe cultural appropriation is bad.
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    (Original post by jensenbudz611)
    I guess the best way, at least for me, to show how it's wrong is through examples:
    Take Muslim women in hijab for example, many people say that the women who wear hijab have no "freedom" and that covering their hair is "backwards", even if it's the women's own decision to cover their hair... BUT when Khloe Kardashian visited Dubai and took a selfie of her in niqab (only her eyes were seen) the majority of comments towards her appropriating the hijab were "wooow *heart eye emoji*".
    In Rastafarian culture and (not to sound racist, just simply stating a race) black culture (I guess), some men and women choose to get weaves and/or dreads.. I've seen my own friend get made fun of for having a weave... Just telling her that her hair is nasty and to clean it and that it's fake (which it is, but...) but I've also seen (white) girls wear weaves/dreads and be complimented for it???
    Another example would be the bindi women wear on their foreheads in Indian/Hindu culture. According to the internet, the general significance of the bindi is supposed to show that the women wearing it (a red bindi) is married. People sometimes make fun of this symbol and call it weird and not modern, however if a woman from another culture were to wear the bindi, just for fun, people would be like "nice!"
    It's not fair for the people from the cultures which are mocked to be criticized for sticking to their culture and way of life when people from other cultures are praised for looking so beautiful in these styles. But also, I've seen women who find these cultures amazing and respect the cultures, etc. which is more like cultural appreciation. Angelina Jolie went to Pakistan a while back and wore the hijab while she was there, it wasn't to show to the media "hey look how hot I am in this hijab" it was to respect Muslim culture (as well as the religion.) I don't know if this helped but this is my reasoning as to why I believe cultural appropriation is bad.
    Preach
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    First, define what cultural appropriation is. And don't use any definitions from Tumblr or Tumblr-esque websites.
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    (Original post by jensenbudz611)
    I guess the best way, at least for me, to show how it's wrong is through examples:
    Take Muslim women in hijab for example, many people say that the women who wear hijab have no "freedom" and that covering their hair is "backwards", even if it's the women's own decision to cover their hair... BUT when Khloe Kardashian visited Dubai and took a selfie of her in niqab (only her eyes were seen) the majority of comments towards her appropriating the hijab were "wooow *heart eye emoji*".
    In Rastafarian culture and (not to sound racist, just simply stating a race) black culture (I guess), some men and women choose to get weaves and/or dreads.. I've seen my own friend get made fun of for having a weave... Just telling her that her hair is nasty and to clean it and that it's fake (which it is, but...) but I've also seen (white) girls wear weaves/dreads and be complimented for it???
    Another example would be the bindi women wear on their foreheads in Indian/Hindu culture. According to the internet, the general significance of the bindi is supposed to show that the women wearing it (a red bindi) is married. People sometimes make fun of this symbol and call it weird and not modern, however if a woman from another culture were to wear the bindi, just for fun, people would be like "nice!"
    It's not fair for the people from the cultures which are mocked to be criticized for sticking to their culture and way of life when people from other cultures are praised for looking so beautiful in these styles. But also, I've seen women who find these cultures amazing and respect the cultures, etc. which is more like cultural appreciation. Angelina Jolie went to Pakistan a while back and wore the hijab while she was there, it wasn't to show to the media "hey look how hot I am in this hijab" it was to respect Muslim culture (as well as the religion.) I don't know if this helped but this is my reasoning as to why I believe cultural appropriation is bad.
    I dont think the majority of muslim women wear the hijab on the basis of their own decision but largely down to social norms/peer pressure.
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    (Original post by Bill_Gates)
    I dont think the majority of muslim women wear the hijab on the basis of their own decision but largely down to social norms/peer pressure.
    This is kind of true, growing up in a Muslim country, I know some of my friends feel pressured into wearing hijab and I know if they had a choice they would take it off in a heartbeat... But you would be surprised by the amount of people who actually wear because they want to and embrace it.
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    (Original post by jensenbudz611)
    This is kind of true, growing up in a Muslim country, I know some of my friends feel pressured into wearing hijab and I know if they had a choice they would take it off in a heartbeat... But you would be surprised by the amount of people who actually wear because they want to and embrace it.
    what about if you like that thing in that culture? I love braided hair, but my friend said that it would be offensive if I did braid it, or tried to. is she right?
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    (Original post by Bill_Gates)
    I dont think the majority of muslim women wear the hijab on the basis of their own decision but largely down to social norms/peer pressure.
    Where's the evidence?
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    (Original post by jensenbudz611)
    This is kind of true, growing up in a Muslim country, I know some of my friends feel pressured into wearing hijab and I know if they had a choice they would take it off in a heartbeat... But you would be surprised by the amount of people who actually wear because they want to and embrace it.
    I agree but the majority i have come across don't like it. And the "muslim" countries i've been to the women don't look too happy.
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    It depends.

    Most cultures don't mind people dressing up in their costume.
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    (Original post by okey)
    Where's the evidence?
    no such research exists. Strict muslim countries wouldn't dare undertake that sort of research and the west we would not waste money on it. But majority of muslim girls i have spoken to share my feelings and you will see from TSR too. Family pressure/peer pressure play a big role.
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    (Original post by FridaKahlo)
    what about if you like that thing in that culture? I love braided hair, but my friend said that it would be offensive if I did braid it, or tried to. is she right?
    I'm sure it would be equally offensive if you enjoyed eating Chinese, Indian, Italian food.
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    (Original post by FridaKahlo)
    what about if you like that thing in that culture? I love braided hair, but my friend said that it would be offensive if I did braid it, or tried to. is she right?
    I don't think it would be wrong but just be aware of the culture and that others may see it as problematic.
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    (Original post by Bill_Gates)
    no such research exists. Strict muslim countries wouldn't dare undertake that sort of research and the west we would not waste money on it. But majority of muslim girls i have spoken to share my feelings and you will see from TSR too. Family pressure/peer pressure play a big role.
    I don't think that conducting research to expose violation of human rights would be a waste of money. I'm sure those factors do play a role for many people but many also wear it of there own accord, so banning it would be equally extreme as forcing it.
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    I would hope not.

    I like it when people embrace my culture.
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    (Original post by FridaKahlo)
    And why?
    It is a ridiculous thing to claim. If it were wrong to copy the clothes, body adornments or hairstyles of people from other cultures all those millions of people in Africa who wear western t-shirts and trousers would be in the lurch, wouldn't they? In the same way, all Australian aborigines who wear any clothes at all would be guilty, and Arabs and Asians who wear European suits would also be guilty.

    Your hair-braded friend is an idiot if she claims you must not have braids.
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    (Original post by FridaKahlo)
    what about if you like that thing in that culture? I love braided hair, but my friend said that it would be offensive if I did braid it, or tried to. is she right?
    correct me if I'm wrong, but I don't think anybody is rude/discriminating/whatever towards braids.
    with hijabs as an example, you don't need to look further than tsr to see people mocking it.
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    (Original post by Shostakovish)
    I would hope not.

    I like it when people embrace my culture.
    Didn't you undergo several phases in your life where you rejected Soviet culture?
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    (Original post by okey)
    I don't think that conducting research to expose violation of human rights would be a waste of money. I'm sure those factors do play a role for many people but many also wear it of there own accord, so banning it would be equally extreme as forcing it.
    I agree. But i just wanted to raise the point.
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    It depends.

    Doing it as a celebration of a culture is fine. Sharing things across cultures is super awesome when it's done sensitively and positively and everything is great.

    Wearing a community's customs in a way that is unsensitive, mocking or as a costume is offensive.

    Sacred headdresses, Day of the Dead makeup, or any other joking around with serious aspects of any culture is not okay.
 
 
 
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