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    I was devastatingly, recently informed that I was academically withdrawn from studying Law, due to failing a module for the third time. I exhausted the internal appeals procedure for my University, due to essentially a lack of evidence. I argued that I was mentally unstable at the time due to my anxiety and provided evidence of my Cognitive Behavioural Therapy appointment letters, thus was not in the correct mindset to sit an exam, or mitigate one.

    My university argued that I should have mitigated my exam before I got my results, and that if I was indeed too unstable to mitigate it I should have provided stronger evidence to prove this. At the time I assumed that the appointment letters were enough, however I could easily go back and ask my GP for a letter stating this, but unfortunately I have exhausted the appeals procedure and thus further evidence will not be accepted. So as a result, have been referred to the OIA to make a complaint. I have read up on them online, and it doesn't look too good.

    I wanted to asko you think my appointment letters were sufficient evidence?Should I take my claim to the OIA and if so, do I have a chance at all?Would the OIA take in new evidence? Any other help on this matter would be very much appreciated.
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    (Original post by samir11)
    I was devastatingly, recently informed that I was academically withdrawn from studying Law, due to failing a module for the third time. I exhausted the internal appeals procedure for my University, due to essentially a lack of evidence. I argued that I was mentally unstable at the time due to my anxiety and provided evidence of my Cognitive Behavioural Therapy appointment letters, thus was not in the correct mindset to sit an exam, or mitigate one.

    My university argued that I should have mitigated my exam before I got my results, and that if I was indeed too unstable to mitigate it I should have provided stronger evidence to prove this. At the time I assumed that the appointment letters were enough, however I could easily go back and ask my GP for a letter stating this, but unfortunately I have exhausted the appeals procedure and thus further evidence will not be accepted. So as a result, have been referred to the OIA to make a complaint. I have read up on them online, and it doesn't look too good.

    I wanted to asko you think my appointment letters were sufficient evidence?Should I take my claim to the OIA and if so, do I have a chance at all?Would the OIA take in new evidence? Any other help on this matter would be very much appreciated.
    You can complain to the OIAHE, but I really wouldn't hold your breath on this one.

    It sounds like you didn't follow university policy on mitigating circumstances - both because it's the norm to have to submit extenuating circumstances forms in advance of sitting the exam (to avoid people finding it went badly and then deciding to make something up) and because most universities say that if you turn up then you are declaring yourself 'fit to sit'. This happened not just once, but three times, and one would expect that you had educated yourself about the mitigating circumstances policy during that time.

    In addition, many people having CBT will be fit to sit exams. Obviously this will depend on the reason tor seeking CBT and the severity of the issue, but this wouldn't be something that is stated on the appointment letter. I would expect that you would need to get a letter from your GP / CBT therapist saying that they did not think you fit to sit the exam in advance of the exam.

    By all means complain to the OIAHE if it will give you closure, but I would be surprised if they ruled in your favour, and even more surprised if they told the uni to take you back as a student. I would start making alternative plans for the future, if I were you.
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    I am in EXACTLY the same boat as you man, i failed a module twice and i got fail withdrawn, they said i could do a different course spoken to various people but theyre absolutely useless, anyway regarding your case i suggest you talk with the head of your course or university and say that you gave evidence if that doesnt work im afraid like me you'll have to apply for 2016-17 year
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    (Original post by Origami Bullets)
    You can complain to the OIAHE, but I really wouldn't hold your breath on this one.

    It sounds like you didn't follow university policy on mitigating circumstances - both because it's the norm to have to submit extenuating circumstances forms in advance of sitting the exam (to avoid people finding it went badly and then deciding to make something up) and because most universities say that if you turn up then you are declaring yourself 'fit to sit'. This happened not just once, but three times, and one would expect that you had educated yourself about the mitigating circumstances policy during that time.

    In addition, many people having CBT will be fit to sit exams. Obviously this will depend on the reason tor seeking CBT and the severity of the issue, but this wouldn't be something that is stated on the appointment letter. I would expect that you would need to get a letter from your GP / CBT therapist saying that they did not think you fit to sit the exam in advance of the exam.

    By all means complain to the OIAHE if it will give you closure, but I would be surprised if they ruled in your favour, and even more surprised if they told the uni to take you back as a student. I would start making alternative plans for the future, if I were you.
    Thank you for your reply. As disappointing as it is to read, you are probably right. I could obtain evidence to prove that I was unfit to sit. But is it too late at this point? Do you know if the OIA, take new evidence in to consideration? Many thanks.
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    (Original post by samir11)
    Thank you for your reply. As disappointing as it is to read, you are probably right. I could obtain evidence to prove that I was unfit to sit. But is it too late at this point? Do you know if the OIA, take new evidence in to consideration? Many thanks.
    I'm afraid I'm not too familiar with the finer points of OIAHE policy, though I would imagine that they have it on their website.

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    (Original post by samir11)
    I wanted to asko you think my appointment letters were sufficient evidence?Should I take my claim to the OIA and if so, do I have a chance at all?Would the OIA take in new evidence? Any other help on this matter would be very much appreciated.
    Just keep in mind this isn't the end of the road. It might not be particularly desirable but you can always start again at another university. Continue with the OIA complaint, but also start thinking about how you might start again if you did want to do so, and how next time you would avoid getting into the same rut.
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    (Original post by samir11)
    Thank you for your reply. As disappointing as it is to read, you are probably right. I could obtain evidence to prove that I was unfit to sit. But is it too late at this point? Do you know if the OIA, take new evidence in to consideration? Many thanks.
    The best thing to do would be to contact the OIAHE directly and ask if they would consider your case and allow new evidence to be submitted. If you have exhausted your internal appeals process, you should have a completion of procedures letter- which will be needed before you can start your complaint to the OIA (and your complaint must be started within 12 months of receiving this letter).

    The OIA's website is fairly comprehensive, and doesn't say anything about not being able to accept new evidence, but I would check with them first before starting your appeal.

    However, if your anxiety was recently so bad that you were unable to complete the mitigating circumstances procedures at your uni, is dragging out the appeals process the best thing for you? Would going back to study be the best thing for your mental health?

    Perhaps a good first step would be to talk to the OIA about your situation to see if they think they could help with it, and if it would be likely to have a positive outcome, as well as seeing what the process would involve and think seriously about how this might affect you.
 
 
 
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