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    Is it different from taking the two courses separately? Is there twice as much work? Is it strange to study two almost completely unrelated courses together?
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    (Original post by Bluehearts98)
    Is it different from taking the two courses separately? Is there twice as much work? Is it strange to study two almost completely unrelated courses together?
    I'm doing neuroscience with computer science, they are completely unrelated, it just means that we basically almost twice as much work to do because while people are focusing on one course which all links together we have 2 different ones if that makes sense.
    It's okay, as long as you keep up with everything and don't let yourself fall behind.
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    I am a first year doing a Neuroscience and Physical Geography dual honours degree at Keele University. I chose this random combination because I really love both areas of study, but as you can imagen, I didn't there I would have the opportunity to study both at degree level. I jumped at the opportunity to study both.

    If you were to take the two courses separately, the only difference would be that you go into more subject depth in your chosen single honours.

    There isn't twice as much work, because you are doing dual honours, therefore you take the same number of units to get your degree as someone who is doing a single honours. The difference is that you only take the core modules from neuroscience and physical geography, and cannot choose electives (optional modules to make up the credits required in the year).

    I must admit that it is very strange studying two very different subjects, and it is often like having two lives. Going from a lecture learning about historic time scales, and trying to get your head around that, and then going to a lecture straight after where you are taught about mitochondria, and trying to get your head around minute scales, is mind blowing. However, it is also fascinating, and I don't think you would get the same experience with many other degree routes.

    Currently, no content overlaps between the subjects (however, this could change over the next two and a half years) but there are transferable skills. For example, part of the Geography course focuses on information literacy and essay writing, which is covered less in Neuroscience, however, I have been able to apply the knowledge I gained in Geography lectures to my Neuroscience essays.

    If you really enjoy both subject areas, like I do, then you will have no issue taking this combination for dual honours.
 
 
 
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