Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free
x Turn on thread page Beta
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    48,360 / 3,100???
    4,836 / 1,560 ???
    anyone know how to make division easier???
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    Oh darn, that's difficult. Don't know how you'll get answers from this forum.
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    calculators were invented for a reason
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Rhia Winterfell)
    48,360 / 3,100???
    with a calculator?
    Offline

    13
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Rhia Winterfell)
    48,360 / 3,100???
    I'm guessing that you've asked this because you've got an exercise that involves manually going through the long division algorithm. As others have pointed out, a calculator makes this easy; however, if you don't have a calculator how should this be approached?

    You can either grind through the long division algorithm...or you can note that sometimes big long divisions sums can be made easier easier by chipping out pieces of the numbers bit by bit using the fact that (a x b)/(c x b) = a/c.


    So for this sum observe that:

    (a) Top and bottom are divisible by 10; so take them out. 48,360 / 3,100 = 4836 / 310.

    (b) Top and bottom are now divisible by 2; take them out: 4836 / 310 = 2418 / 155

    (c) Gets a bit harder now, but note that 155 is divisible by 5: 155 = 31 x 5. 2418 is not divisible by 5...so we can't take that out, but now use long division to see if 2418 is divisible by 31. It is; 4836 = 78 x 31. So we can now take out 31 from top and bottom: 2418 /155 = 78 / 5. A much easier sum to do!

    What we've done here is to reduce a tedious long division to a bit of thought plus an easier long division - all the hard work is done in working out 2418 / 31.
    Online

    19
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Gregorius)
    I'm guessing that you've asked this because you've got an exercise that involves manually going through the long division algorithm. As others have pointed out, a calculator makes this easy; however, if you don't have a calculator how should this be approached?

    You can either grind through the long division algorithm...or you can note that sometimes big long divisions sums can be made easier easier by chipping out pieces of the numbers bit by bit using the fact that (a x b)/(c x b) = a/c.


    So for this sum observe that:

    (a) Top and bottom are divisible by 10; so take them out. 48,360 / 3,100 = 4836 / 310.

    (b) Top and bottom are now divisible by 2; take them out: 4836 / 310 = 2418 / 155

    (c) Gets a bit harder now, but note that 155 is divisible by 5: 155 = 31 x 5. 2418 is not divisible by 5...so we can't take that out, but now use long division to see if 2418 is divisible by 31. It is; 4836 = 78 x 31. So we can now take out 31 from top and bottom: 2418 /155 = 78 / 5. A much easier sum to do!

    What we've done here is to reduce a tedious long division to a bit of thought plus an easier long division - all the hard work is done in working out 2418 / 31.
    Or you can find highest common factor with Euclidean algorithm
    edit: I dunno if this is much faster than long division since I don't think I've ever done long division on numbers lol
    Double edit: well since the answer has a nice decimal the cheapest and quickest way is just normal non-calculator division
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Gregorius)
    I'm guessing that you've asked this because you've got an exercise that involves manually going through the long division algorithm. As others have pointed out, a calculator makes this easy; however, if you don't have a calculator how should this be approached?

    You can either grind through the long division algorithm...or you can note that sometimes big long divisions sums can be made easier easier by chipping out pieces of the numbers bit by bit using the fact that (a x b)/(c x b) = a/c.


    So for this sum observe that:

    (a) Top and bottom are divisible by 10; so take them out. 48,360 / 3,100 = 4836 / 310.

    (b) Top and bottom are now divisible by 2; take them out: 4836 / 310 = 2418 / 155

    (c) Gets a bit harder now, but note that 155 is divisible by 5: 155 = 31 x 5. 2418 is not divisible by 5...so we can't take that out, but now use long division to see if 2418 is divisible by 31. It is; 4836 = 78 x 31. So we can now take out 31 from top and bottom: 2418 /155 = 78 / 5. A much easier sum to do!

    What we've done here is to reduce a tedious long division to a bit of thought plus an easier long division - all the hard work is done in working out 2418 / 31.
    hi, yeah i cant use a calculator, im useless at maths and even worse at long division
    Offline

    13
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Rhia Winterfell)
    hi, yeah i cant use a calculator, im useless at maths and even worse at long division
    Well, these boards are here to help! I can see from your user profile and previous posts that you're doing an access course for midwifery and that you're preparing for GCSE maths. So I hope that you're being supported by wherever you're studying at the moment in developing maths skills. My own university department offers courses in nursing and midwifery, and we're used to students arriving who have little previous experience of maths or who have forgotten what they once learned; we have special skills development workshops for such students.

    You say you cant use a calculator - is this because you have never yet used one, or is there some reason you are unable to use one?
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Gregorius)
    Well, these boards are here to help! I can see from your user profile and previous posts that you're doing an access course for midwifery and that you're preparing for GCSE maths. So I hope that you're being supported by wherever you're studying at the moment in developing maths skills. My own university department offers courses in nursing and midwifery, and we're used to students arriving who have little previous experience of maths or who have forgotten what they once learned; we have special skills development workshops for such students.

    You say you cant use a calculator - is this because you have never yet used one, or is there some reason you are unable to use one?
    im doing a maths assessment as part of my access course. im doing revision questions and some things i cant get my head around
 
 
 
Reply
Submit reply
Turn on thread page Beta
Updated: November 3, 2015
Poll
Do you agree with the proposed ban on plastic straws and cotton buds?
Useful resources

Make your revision easier

Maths

Maths Forum posting guidelines

Not sure where to post? Read the updated guidelines here

Equations

How to use LaTex

Writing equations the easy way

Student revising

Study habits of A* students

Top tips from students who have already aced their exams

Study Planner

Create your own Study Planner

Never miss a deadline again

Polling station sign

Thinking about a maths degree?

Chat with other maths applicants

Can you help? Study help unanswered threads

Groups associated with this forum:

View associated groups

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Write a reply...
Reply
Hide
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.