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    Masters degrees used to be around 3k for a full time year in most subjects when i did my first one in 2009.

    It's gone from something that can be done with careful money management and hard work to being out of reach (most i see now start from between 5-6k!).

    The lack of available loans doesn't offend me as much as the actual cost to be honest. I don't just mean that from a selfish perspective but in terms of how it's not fair how the current price tag alienates so many people. It's really bad!

    What are your thoughts?
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    I agree fully.

    The price hike is mostly in and of itself, I suspect. The real value of a master's certainly hasn't gone up.

    I would like to do one but am priced out.
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    (Original post by beautifulbigmacs)
    Masters degrees used to be around 3k for a full time year in most subjects when i did my first one in 2009.

    It's gone from something that can be done with careful money management and hard work to being out of reach (most i see now start from between 5-6k!).

    The lack of available loans doesn't offend me as much as the actual cost to be honest. I don't just mean that from a selfish perspective but in terms of how it's not fair how the current price tag alienates so many people. It's really bad!

    What are your thoughts?
    With the possible introduction of postgraduate loans, within the next 5-10 years I see masters degrees becoming the new undergrad.

    With the large amount of people doing undergrad degrees, the masters will become the differentiating factor. The fees will increase.

    A typical masters at a top University costs around 10k atm. With 10k loans being available, I see the fees increasing to 15+ as Universities realise they can charge more.
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    Universities need money.
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    It's so sad. I would rather that a masters cost 3k with no loan like the good old days.

    If a loan can be taken out to pay for a masters degree, I agree that fees will go up. More student debt is not a good thing and I think it will change the value of a masters potentially: it could go from being a meaningful stage of further study that can be paid for outright with careful budgeting to a means of staying in uni "just because" and accumulating more debt. This is not a good thing at all.

    I don't want the loans to come in. They will make higher prices become the norm. I think the cost of masters degrees should be no more than 4.5k so they can be self funded (part time self funded study can be an option then).
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    (Original post by beautifulbigmacs)
    It's so sad. I would rather that a masters cost 3k with no loan like the good old days.

    If a loan can be taken out to pay for a masters degree, I agree that fees will go up. More student debt is not a good thing and I think it will change the value of a masters potentially: it could go from being a meaningful stage of further study that can be paid for outright with careful budgeting to a means of staying in uni "just because" and accumulating more debt. This is not a good thing at all.

    I don't want the loans to come in. They will make higher prices become the norm. I think the cost of masters degrees should be no more than 4.5k so they can be self funded (part time self funded study can be an option then).
    Postgrad loans are unlikely to come in seeing as how they were a proposal from the previous government and the current government seems very indifferent to it. Plus someone mentioned in another thread that the undergrad student loan system is a mess so I don't really seem them in a position to create another loan system.
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    As quite a leftwing person, I'm surprising myself by feeling pleased the loans won't come in.

    i would prefer the loan system to stay as is but for undergraduate fees to come down and for postgraduate fees to come down in proportion also (both ug and pg was 3k per year back in my day which wasn't that long ago). More loans means higher fees and it's just going spiral. It will also mean that if it becomes impossible to self fund masters, people will be restricted to doing one which is what has happened with undergraduate courses. It will mean that a masters is no longer a manageable way to change career/widen options/study for pleasure and I think that's wrong.
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    (Original post by beautifulbigmacs)
    It's so sad. I would rather that a masters cost 3k with no loan like the good old days.

    If a loan can be taken out to pay for a masters degree, I agree that fees will go up. More student debt is not a good thing and I think it will change the value of a masters potentially: it could go from being a meaningful stage of further study that can be paid for outright with careful budgeting to a means of staying in uni "just because" and accumulating more debt. This is not a good thing at all.

    I don't want the loans to come in. They will make higher prices become the norm. I think the cost of masters degrees should be no more than 4.5k so they can be self funded (part time self funded study can be an option then).
    I would have to disagree. Had postgraduate fees stayed at 3-6k then I agree there wouldn't be much need for postgraduate loans.

    However, seeing as how a masters degree costs 10k right now, without the loans most people are already priced out. What is needed is stricter controls on postgraduate fees, alongside a loans system
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    But I'm saying they shouldn't be even near 10k in the first place. I think if the loans come in it will just encourage unis to increase prices.
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    You think you have it rough? Fees for non UK/EU students range from 15k - 30k! Just the tuition fees for a one year master's degree in Computing(conversion) at Imperial is 28k pounds!! Add to that the living expenses in London!
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    (Original post by SilverSlash)
    You think you have it rough? Fees for non UK/EU students range from 15k - 30k! Just the tuition fees for a one year master's degree in Computing(conversion) at Imperial is 28k pounds!! Add to that the living expenses in London!
    I would never pay that for a Masters degree. That kind of money is the sort that I'd want to put down on a house. I'd see that as hardcore investing in something type money rather than masters degree type money (I know a masters is an investment but outright 28k...no way! Too farfetched I feel).
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    (Original post by beautifulbigmacs)
    I would never pay that for a Masters degree. That kind of money is the sort that I'd want to put down on a house. I'd see that as hardcore investing in something type money rather than masters degree type money (I know a masters is an investment but outright 28k...no way! Too farfetched I feel).
    I guess the kinds of people paying that money are international students who are wealthy.

    Home students wouldn't be able to afford anything like that, nor would it be sensible.

    The maximum that I would be willing to pay is half that, at around 15k. And even that's a hell of a lot.
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    (Original post by SilverSlash)
    You think you have it rough? Fees for non UK/EU students range from 15k - 30k! Just the tuition fees for a one year master's degree in Computing(conversion) at Imperial is 28k pounds!! Add to that the living expenses in London!
    Yes they are ridiculously high, especially at the London universities (and probably hard to justify in terms of enhanced employability) - is there no alternative for your chosen career route?

    Just a quick Google shows that you could do a computing conversion course at Kent for £15,380, which would be a big saving over Imperial.

    And everybody who undertakes postgrad study, especially at Masters level, 'has it rough', everyone's got their personal difficult decisions to make.
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    Some really interesting replies here.

    My personal maximum fee I am happy to pay is for a postgraduate degree that is only a smidge or so above 5k (or ideally less) and even then i would only be looking to do up to PgCert or PgDip anyway (I had an offer from Leeds Beckett to study MSc Psychology conversion but regretfully had to turn it down because they insisted that PgCert and PgDip aren't offered as exit awards and I couldn't guarantee if I could pay the full £4200 over two years so I needed the safety net really).

    So yeah, my point being that I wouldn't pay more than 5k for a masters and due to even that cost I would be looking to exit with either a PgCert or PgDip. Also, there is a rise in the number of distance learning masters available so I would strongly recommend looking for those because it means not having to pay costs associated with moving away etc.
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    What I cannot understand is why Imperial charges such an exorbitant tuition fee for a one year master's degree. Does the UK not want bright international students to even enroll in their institutions? I think we all can agree that a major component of the USA's scientific and technological success has been its H-1B visa and its universities attracting foreign talent to study there. So why does the UK deter foreign students from studying there by charging unreasonably high fees?

    Since I know most of you are from UK, what are your opinions regarding this?
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    (Original post by SilverSlash)
    What I cannot understand is why Imperial charges such an exorbitant tuition fee for a one year master's degree. Does the UK not want bright international students to even enroll in their institutions? I think we all can agree that a major component of the USA's scientific and technological success has been its H-1B visa and its universities attracting foreign talent to study there. So why does the UK deter foreign students from studying there by charging unreasonably high fees?

    Since I know most of you are from UK, what are your opinions regarding this?
    The same reason why iPhones are so expensive: supply and demand. If enough people are willing to pay that much for it, the price is justified. Else, they would close the programme. Funnily enough, Imperial probably also has an application fee that you just to have the chance to apply!
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    (Original post by Juichiro)
    The same reason why iPhones are so expensive: supply and demand. If enough people are willing to pay that much for it, the price is justified. Else, they would close the programme. Funnily enough, Imperial probably also has an application fee that you just to have the chance to apply!
    But Apple is a private corporation whereas Imperial College London is a public university.
    An MSc in CS at Oxford University costs 21k, which still might be perceived as very expensive but still 7k pounds cheaper.
    Anyways, I'm not trying to start an argument. I understand that they have the right to charge whatever fees they deem appropriate. I just want to know your opinions regarding it.
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    (Original post by SilverSlash)
    But Apple is a private corporation whereas Imperial College London is a public university.
    An MSc in CS at Oxford University costs 21k, which still might be perceived as very expensive but still 7k pounds cheaper.
    Anyways, I'm not trying to start an argument. I understand that they have the right to charge whatever fees they deem appropriate. I just want to know your opinions regarding it.
    There is the perception that, as it's a public university partially funded by the British taxpayer, British students have already contributed (directly thorough their own taxes or indirectly through their parents' taxes) and therefore do not pay that portion of the fees.

    It's not as simple as that, and I'm sure that the sums don't directly correlate, but that's the basic premise.

    This is why undergrads have the three year residence rule to be eligible for UK fees, and why the ELQ rule came in - you can only take advantage of this subsidy once at each level.

    As far as the variation goes, I agree with Juichiro in that it's supply and demand - a university with a good international reputation will push their fees as high as they can to attract wealthy international students. Unfortunately, UK universities are badly underfunded and they will take the opportunity to boost their income where they can. It's up to individuals to decide whether the investment is worth it for them.
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    Re supply and demand.

    I think people need to vote with their feet. The more people who are willing to give silly money to unis for fees (whether that comes with difficulty or ease), the more it sends out a message of "we consent so you can all keep putting the prices up to this kind of amount".

    As with a lot of things in this country, capitalism and extortion gets worse because people are too unwilling to fight it. We should not be giving unis the power to be effectively saying "well that's what it costs. Now do you want this degree or don't you?"

    Very worrying indeed.
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    Why don't more people do their masters abroad? Seems stupid to pay £10k plus when you could go to Germany and study for free. They have lots of good universities which do English-taught masters. No fees. Low cost of living. Very cheap rent. I'm surprised there isn't a stampede of British students heading to the continent.
 
 
 
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