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    Hello,

    I am not quite familiar with the UK high school maths system. I know you have A-levels and something called "further maths". Doing some research online, it looks like people who do further maths learn differential and integral calculus, vectors, differential equations, group theory, linear algebra (matrices, eigenvectors), statistics and probability, and mechanics.

    In the U.S high schools do not offer anything close to this much math. I don't actually know a whole lot of math, but of the math I do know, I know how to apply it very well. Basically, I am quite good at olympiads (problem-solving using minimal knowledge), and I don't know much of the further maths syllabus beyong differential/integral/vector calculus.

    I am wondering if I will more than just olympiad-type experience to pass the Trinity interview?

    Having looked at some specimen tests for the Trinity Maths entrance exam, there does not appear to be any further maths:

    https://share.trin.cam.ac.uk/sites/p...ampletest1.pdf

    https://share.trin.cam.ac.uk/sites/p...ampletest2.pdf

    https://share.trin.cam.ac.uk/sites/p...ampletest3.pdf

    It seems to me mostly like problem-solving (easier than Olympiad problems), and some differntial/integral calculus. Even the STEP exam is not too hard content wise (and problem solving wise its also doable for me).

    But my friend tells me you need to know all of the Further Maths 3 stuff like rotation matrices, eigenvectors, bivariate statistics, etc. At the Trinity interview would I really be tested on this stuff?

    I don't know, but I find it hard to believe that everyone who gets into trinity studied up on eigenvectors and group theory and statistics to pass the Trinity interview. Please tell me its just Olympiad style?

    Thanks for your help.
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    Trinity can't guarantee that all their applicants for maths will be studying A-level further maths (it isn't an option at some schools), so I imagine that the test will mainly be on A-level maths, specifically the modules C1, C2, C3 and C4. Obviously, the questions will be much harder than standard A-level ones, as they are aimed at the best few percent of mathematicians. I strongly doubt that FP3 would appear on the test - even people studying further maths won't necessarily cover it. I remember reading that maths tests at interview were similar to STEP I papers in difficulty (although the questions will be much shorter, as you have less time). You could also try looking at Oxford MAT past papers.
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    (Original post by sweeneyrod)
    Trinity can't guarantee that all their applicants for maths will be studying A-level further maths (it isn't an option at some schools), so I imagine that the test will mainly be on A-level maths, specifically the modules C1, C2, C3 and C4. Obviously, the questions will be much harder than standard A-level ones, as they are aimed at the best few percent of mathematicians. I strongly doubt that FP3 would appear on the test - even people studying further maths won't necessarily cover it. I remember reading that maths tests at interview were similar to STEP I papers in difficulty (although the questions will be much shorter, as you have less time). You could also try looking at Oxford MAT past papers.
    The vast majority of applicants for places at Trinity will be taking two Mathematics A-levels. While this certainly provides a good preparation for the Tripos, and is a course we recommend potential candidates to follow, wherever possible, we recognise that in some schools this may not be the case. AS Further Maths is now a necessary requirement.

    AS Further Maths is now a necessary requirement, whether your school offers it or not. But if you do not study A-Level Further Maths, whether your school offers it or not, you would be unlikely to secure a place/offer at Trinity due to the high level of intense competition.
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    (Original post by Zacken)
    The vast majority of applicants for places at Trinity will be taking two Mathematics A-levels. While this certainly provides a good preparation for the Tripos, and is a course we recommend potential candidates to follow, wherever possible, we recognise that in some schools this may not be the case. AS Further Maths is now a necessary requirement.

    AS Further Maths is now a necessary requirement, whether your school offers it or not. But if you do not study A-Level Further Maths, whether your school offers it or not, you would be unlikely to secure a place/offer at Trinity due to the high level of intense competition.
    Maybe so but the OP (from America - so not taking FM per se) was asking about the role of FM in Trinity's interview test, and the absence of FM content in the sample questions. It would seem quite possible that Trinity don't ask any (or much) about FM topics in their test - idk... do you?
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    Perhaps he is talking about the need to know FM for the STEP II/III exam?
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    (Original post by Trinitymaths)
    Perhaps he is talking about the need to know FM for the STEP II/III exam?
    Probably but that's not what you originally asked.

    In which case there is *plenty* of info about STEP on TSR and from Cambridge... Main point is you only need to provide 6 answers from 13 questions per paper, so you can easily avoid questions about unfamiliar topics.

    Posted from TSR Mobile
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    (Original post by jneill)
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    (Original post by Trinitymaths)
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    (I was replying to the person I quoted, not the OP, I haven't addressed the OP yet)

    But, as for the OP's query:

    Nopes, they don't - the questions are based on strictly general mathematics and whilst further maths topics like hyperbolic functions comes in useful every now and then, Trinity does not expect you to do all the questions, so you can easily do the test without FM knowledge. Some people have done 2-3 questions on the test and gotten offers, others have done 9-10 on the test (there are 10 question) and gotten offers, Trinity isn't very fussed about the number of questions, so you should be fine!

    Although, once it comes to STEP III - the OP is going to be in trouble.
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    (Original post by Zacken)
    (I was replying to the person I quoted, not the OP, I haven't addressed the OP yet)

    But, as for the OP's query:

    Nopes, they don't - the questions are based on strictly general mathematics and whilst further maths topics like hyperbolic functions comes in useful every now and then, Trinity does not expect you to do all the questions, so you can easily do the test without FM knowledge. Some people have done 2-3 questions on the test and gotten offers, others have done 9-10 on the test (there are 10 question) and gotten offers, Trinity isn't very fussed about the number of questions, so you should be fine!

    Although, once it comes to STEP III - the OP is going to be in trouble.
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    (Original post by Zacken)
    (I was replying to the person I quoted, not the OP, I haven't addressed the OP yet)

    But, as for the OP's query:

    Nopes, they don't - the questions are based on strictly general mathematics and whilst further maths topics like hyperbolic functions comes in useful every now and then, Trinity does not expect you to do all the questions, so you can easily do the test without FM knowledge. Some people have done 2-3 questions on the test and gotten offers, others have done 9-10 on the test (there are 10 question) and gotten offers, Trinity isn't very fussed about the number of questions, so you should be fine!

    Although, once it comes to STEP III - the OP is going to be in trouble.
    I have taken a STEP III exam and I was able to solve 9 questions in the time limit of 3 hours. I know differential/integral/vector calculus, probability, and mechanics, which is basically the content on STEP.

    However I don't know linear algebra or group theory or differential equations. But looking at the previous STEP exams, this doesn't appear to be a problem.
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    (Original post by Trinitymaths)
    I have taken a STEP III exam and I was able to solve 9 questions in the time limit of 3 hours. I know differential/integral/vector calculus, probability, and mechanics, which is basically the content on STEP.

    However I don't know linear algebra or group theory or differential equations. But looking at the previous STEP exams, this doesn't appear to be a problem.
    Group theory isn't a requisite for A-Levels or STEP, however, knowledge of hyperbolic functions, co-ordinate systems, linear algebra, vectors, and a whole host of other pure topics come up and will be a large part of your undergraduate degree. Mathematics is not only calculus, probability and mechanics (although it might seem that way from an american high school curriculum).

    However, since you seem to be fine with STEP III - then I'll leave you to your own devices.
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    Of course I know that math is more than calculus. I actually took some summer classes in elementary set theory and number theory.

    But now I know, the Trinity test is general math and problem solving similar to the STEP I.

    Thanks for your help.
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    If you managed to do nine questions on STEP III (the hardest STEP exam, by a fair distance) within the time limit (and got them right!) you'll be completely fine with the interview test. I'm impressed that you managed to do that well without knowing about differential equations, as I was under the impression that they formed quite a big part of both the pure and mechanics questions.
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    I was able to do the probability, mechanics, and integral/differentia/vector caluclus, and the general questions. Differential equations only came up in a few questions.
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    (Original post by sweeneyrod)
    If you managed to do nine questions on STEP III (the hardest STEP exam, by a fair distance) within the time limit (and got them right!) you'll be completely fine with the interview test. I'm impressed that you managed to do that well without knowing about differential equations, as I was under the impression that they formed quite a big part of both the pure and mechanics questions.
    You're lucky if differential equations comes up because it's one of the easiest pure topics - it doesn't come up that often though.

    @OP: check out STEP III 2013.
 
 
 
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