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Doctor or lawyer? watch

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    Hi.
    For my whole life i have wnted to become a doctor, but then I realized how long it takes to become one and the stress of it. I dont enjoy science, but i can deal with subjects and there isnt any subject that i hate with a passion. I love debating and talking, so i thought i could be a lawyer, but i dont know the pros and cons of a doctor or a lawyer. So can u explain to me how long it takes to become each one, the wage and if its really hard and stressful. Oh yh and i am mot great at english, i am trying but i ain't amazing. From the uk, so it would be better from someone, who knows how the british system of these two is.
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    (Original post by Maya461)
    Hi.
    For my whole life i have wnted to become a doctor, but then I realized how long it takes to become one and the stress of it. I dont enjoy science, but i can deal with subjects and there isnt any subject that i hate with a passion. I love debating and talking, so i thought i could be a lawyer, but i dont know the pros and cons of a doctor or a lawyer. So can u explain to me how long it takes to become each one, the wage and if its really hard and stressful. Oh yh and i am mot great at english, i am trying but i ain't amazing. From the uk, so it would be better from someone, who knows how the british system of these two is.
    Don't become a doctor if you don't love science and you aren't willing to go through the stress and effort it takes to succeed as one.

    You won't survive medical school with that attitude anyway. I suggest you look further into law if that's the case.
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    If you don't love science, feel like it would be stressful and are not sure you would make it through medical school, why would you want to become a doctor? (that a genuine question btw!)

    It sounds like law would be better. Although from personal experience, my dads a lawyer, it doesn't seem any less stressful or like less work. Also everyone tries to be a lawyer because its a good fall back as there are no specific A-level, Degree requirements.
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    I felt that I love the fact of doing opperations and stuf.

    But with lawyer I have a genuine passion with debating but I don't really love English. Like its okay but eh
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    You don't need english to be a lawyer. Ideal subjects are history, classics, english lit and languages but none are necessary. A law course is very hard to get onto and dry to study at uni, and that's not the hard part, the hard part is getting a training contract!

    There are many more law graduates than there are lawyers so the chances of you actually getting a highly paid job aren't as high as you'd think. There is high demand, however, for medical graduates. (Everywhere needs doctors, not dissimilar to policemen, teachers etc) They're also payed consistently well.

    For both however, you need exceptional GCSE and A Level grades.

    (personally I think law would be more stressful because employers are ridiculously hard on you in your first few years, it's not just the studying that is stressful, but, as you said, medicine takes longer to graduate from)

    Do you study history/triple science at GCSE? What are you predicted?
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    (Original post by Maya461)
    I felt that I love the fact of doing opperations and stuf.

    But with lawyer I have a genuine passion with debating but I don't really love English. Like its okay but eh
    I suggest you to start loving English as it is what you will have to deal with in the next 3 years. Law is about the use of language and you need to be able to spend hours reading dull passages to gather some useful information. Also, there is no debating on the law degree unless you join a debating society, it's just reading, applying law and writing.
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    (Original post by kiera28)
    You don't need english to be a lawyer. Ideal subjects are history, classics, english lit and languages but none are necessary. A law course is very hard to get onto and dry to study at uni, and that's not the hard part, the hard part is getting a training contract!

    There are many more law graduates than there are lawyers so the chances of you actually getting a highly paid job aren't as high as you'd think. There is high demand, however, for medical graduates. (Everywhere needs doctors, not dissimilar to policemen, teachers etc)

    For both however, you need exceptional GCSE and A Level grades.
    To get into medicine you need exceptional GCSEs and A-levels, for law these become less important as long as you pass your GCSEs and get above average A-levels. It however depends on whether the OP wants to become a barrister or a solicitor, there are solicitors with average grades and degrees from mets, but less so with barristers.
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    How old are you currently?
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    (Original post by Maya461)
    Hi.
    For my whole life i have wnted to become a doctor, but then I realized how long it takes to become one and the stress of it. I dont enjoy science, but i can deal with subjects and there isnt any subject that i hate with a passion. I love debating and talking, so i thought i could be a lawyer, but i dont know the pros and cons of a doctor or a lawyer. So can u explain to me how long it takes to become each one, the wage and if its really hard and stressful. Oh yh and i am mot great at english, i am trying but i ain't amazing. From the uk, so it would be better from someone, who knows how the british system of these two is.
    Please don't apply for medicine. It seems like once upon a time you enjoyed the image associated with being a doctor, but as soon as you realised the reality of what it entails, you got put off. That's fine - so go with your instincts and consider something else.

    (Original post by Maya461)
    I felt that I love the fact of doing opperations and stuf.
    Case in point. Being a doctor, hell, being a surgeon is about much more than doing operations and stuff. It's a complete package, and it doesn't sound like one you'd enjoy.
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    (Original post by 0123456543210)
    To get into medicine you need exceptional GCSEs and A-levels, for law these become less important as long as you pass your GCSEs and get above average A-levels. It however depends on whether the OP wants to become a barrister or a solicitor, there are solicitors with average grades and degrees from mets, but less so with barristers.
    This may be true for finding employment, but law courses at uni are highly competitive so do study law you need well above average GCSEs and, generally AAB and above at A Level.
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    (Original post by kiera28)
    You don't need english to be a lawyer. Ideal subjects are history, classics, english lit and languages but none are necessary. A law course is very hard to get onto and dry to study at uni, and that's not the hard part, the hard part is getting a training contract!

    There are many more law graduates than there are lawyers so the chances of you actually getting a highly paid job aren't as high as you'd think. There is high demand, however, for medical graduates. (Everywhere needs doctors, not dissimilar to policemen, teachers etc) They're also payed consistently well.

    For both however, you need exceptional GCSE and A Level grades.

    (personally I think law would be more stressful because employers are ridiculously hard on you in your first few years, it's not just the studying that is stressful, but, as you said, medicine takes longer to graduate from)

    Do you study history/triple science at GCSE? What are you predicted?
    Doctors are not paid consistently well, at least not in the NHS. All you have to do is read the current news about the BMA fighting to get better pay for doctors while the government just wants to cut salaries to below minimum wage. -_-
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    (Original post by asif007)
    Doctors are not paid consistently well, at least not in the NHS. All you have to do is read the current news about the BMA fighting to get better pay for doctors while the government just wants to cut salaries to below minimum wage. -_-
    I said they are paid consistently well, not consistently paid well, meaning there is a shortage of med-grads. They are consistently payed well because there is high demand for doctors. I mean that there won't likely be large gaps in your finding employment.
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    (Original post by kiera28)
    I said they are paid consistently well, not consistently paid well, meaning there is a shortage of med-grads. They are consistently payed well because there is high demand for doctors.
    Regardless of how you word it, doctors are not well-paid at all. Medicine has never been known for the money (at least not in the UK) but compared to other professions the pay is awful. High demand makes no difference.
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    (Original post by Maya461)
    Hi.
    For my whole life i have wnted to become a doctor, but then I realized how long it takes to become one and the stress of it. I dont enjoy science, but i can deal with subjects and there isnt any subject that i hate with a passion. I love debating and talking, so i thought i could be a lawyer, but i dont know the pros and cons of a doctor or a lawyer. So can u explain to me how long it takes to become each one, the wage and if its really hard and stressful. Oh yh and i am mot great at english, i am trying but i ain't amazing. From the uk, so it would be better from someone, who knows how the british system of these two is.
    I'd recommend not pigeon-holing yourself. Study whatever subjects you find truly interesting at university because a law degree is not required to become a solicitor or barrister in the UK as a post-graduate diploma in law can be taken to qualify as a practicing lawyer.

    You sound like you want to be a barrister, or at least have the impression that lawyer work is the same as barrister work (i.e. arguing in front of a court). Anyways here are some information about the profession which may be relevant to your choice:

    1. The profession is prestigious, but ultra-competitive to become one. This year, the number of pupilages (trainee barrister) positions available was less than 400 for the first time. Pupil barristers are often the cream of the crop of their cohort of law students (generally speaking).
    2. Barristers from elite chambers (something like a firm) more often than not studied at Oxbridge and graduated with firsts, and usually have an LLM/BCL (masters for law) - so that's at least 5 years of study if you include the BPTC (the professional course all barristers are required to take)
    3. Barristers are self-employed, and salaries vary vastly for the different practice areas. Some areas such as criminal law are also heavily reliant on legal aid, which is being cut. So it is not true to say that becoming a barrister is a road to riches.
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    (Original post by asif007)
    Regardless of how you word it, doctors are not well-paid at all. Medicine has never been known for the money (at least not in the UK) but compared to other professions the pay is awful. High demand makes no difference.
    My step-sister went into her first job as a doctor the minute she qualified at £33,000. Her starting salary was £13,000 higher than the average UK salary. I quote the telegraph, 'There are around 45,000 hospital consultants who are paid between £74,504 a year and £100,446 a year. Salaries for the UK's 42,000 GPs vary from an average of £103,000 a year for partners in practices to anything between £53,781 and £81,158 for GPs employed by Primary Care Trusts.'

    I'm not sure what your definition of good pay is, but anything between £53,000 and £103,000 seems good to me :happy2:
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    (Original post by kiera28)
    My step-sister went into her first job as a doctor the minute she qualified at £33,000. Her starting salary was £13,000 higher than the average UK salary. I quote the telegraph, 'There are around 45,000 hospital consultants who are paid between £74,504 a year and £100,446 a year. Salaries for the UK's 42,000 GPs vary from an average of £103,000 a year for partners in practices to anything between £53,781 and £81,158 for GPs employed by Primary Care Trusts.'

    I'm not sure what your definition of good pay is, but anything between £53,000 and £103,000 seems good to me :happy2:
    Er, the joke is on you if you're getting your numbers from The Telegraph of all places. That's all media spin. No junior doctor earns £33,000 straight out of medical school when the starting salary is £22,636. Look at the official NHS webpage instead of blindly listening to what the newspapers say. Need I say any more?

    https://www.healthcareers.nhs.uk/abo...ne/pay-doctors

    Of course a salary of £100,000 is good if it were actually realistic and achievable. But considering that no doctor earns anywhere near that much until consultant level which takes around 10 years of training on top of 5-6 years of medical school, I'd say that's way too long to spend working for a lower wage when plenty of people in other jobs could be earning the same, if not more than that, in much less time.

    Not to mention all the additional costs for compulsory exams, pension contributions and indemnity which cut into the take-home amount every month. Honestly, if you don't believe me then do you think all the doctors who wrote this article are lying?:

    http://www.theguardian.com/global/20...ment-of-health
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    (Original post by asif007)
    Er, the joke is on you if you're getting your numbers from The Telegraph of all places. That's all media spin. No junior doctor earns £33,000 straight out of medical school when the starting salary is £22,636. Look at the official NHS webpage instead of blindly listening to what the newspapers say. Need I say any more?

    https://www.healthcareers.nhs.uk/abo...ne/pay-doctors

    Of course a salary of £100,000 is good if it were actually realistic and achievable. But considering that no doctor earns anywhere near that much until consultant level which takes around 10 years of training on top of 5-6 years of medical school, I'd say that's way too long to spend working for a lower wage when plenty of people in other jobs could be earning the same, if not more than that, in much less time.

    Not to mention all the additional costs for compulsory exams, pension contributions and indemnity which cut into the take-home amount every month. Honestly, if you don't believe me then do you think all the doctors who wrote this article are lying?:

    http://www.theguardian.com/global/20...ment-of-health
    My sister did.

    Of course you wouldn't reach £100,000 after 10 years of experience. If you don't want to work your way up and stay in the proffession for at least 10 years, then if your own lack of perseverance that's the issue. I don't think you understand what the rest of the country earn. 😂 The average wage is £20,000. If you're correct in saying 'the starting salary is £22,636' then again that is more than the UK national average pay! Across all working ages, let alone people in their mid twenties. It is currently a well paid job- you can't argue with that.

    Yes it's a lot of work. It's up to each individual to decide whether or not it's worth it, depending on how clever or else you are, and how lazy or motivated you are.
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    Don't become either if you're not passionate about it.

    Your biggest concern seems to be money, and not whether you will enjoy working as a doctor or lawyer for the rest of your life.
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    (Original post by kiera28)
    My sister did.

    Of course you wouldn't reach £100,000 after 10 years of experience. If you don't want to work your way up and stay in the proffession for at least 10 years, then if your own lack of perseverance that's the issue. I don't think you understand what the rest of the country earn. 😂 The average wage is £20,000. If you're correct in saying 'the starting salary is £22,636' then again that is more than the UK national average pay! Across all working ages, let alone people in their mid twenties. It is currently a well paid job- you can't argue with that.

    Yes it's a lot of work. It's up to each individual to decide whether or not it's worth it, depending on how clever or else you are, and how lazy or motivated you are.
    Every other junior doctor earns ~£22,000 in their first job straight out of medical school, but your sister earned £33,000. One of you is lying - I'd be more inclined to believe all the other junior doctors as I've actually seen some of their payslips for a typical month on the job as an FY1. £33,000 is a salary I would expect a doctor to earn once they've been working for 5 years or more in the NHS, not straight out of medical school. I've given you official evidence on the NHS website for the pay at every level of training and I'm not just getting this from hearsay or from the newspapers which are very poorly informed.

    If it's true that the average wage is £20,000 then yes a doctor may be slightly better paid than that in their first job out of medical school. But to me, putting in 6 years of hard work doesn't justify being paid only £636 more than that when I could have earned a higher salary if I'd left school at 16 and worked in a supermarket (it's been proven that retail workers with no qualifications now earn more than junior doctors in the NHS). That £636 extra is negligible when the cost of medical licensing exams goes into the thousands - and every doctor has to pay for that in order to progress to consultant level. I might not understand what the rest of the country earn, but I don't think you understand just how much additional expense goes into medical training, all of which doctors have to pay for themselves. Without it they are not allowed to practice, and after taxes many of them are living off minimum wage. Read that article from The Guardian I showed you in my last post, the evidence is there.

    It might be well-paid at face value and compared to some other jobs (not all of them) but IMHO it's not worth 5 years of study to be paid less than I would if I had worked in a shop. It's got nothing to do with perseverance, there are several doctors leaving Medicine nowadays after working in the NHS for years because the pay is just too little to live on. I'm sorry but, like many other medical students, I'm not happy about graduating so that I can be poor, unable to save any money and unable to support myself, let alone a family.
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    (Original post by Maya461)
    Hi.
    For my whole life i have wnted to become a doctor, but then I realized how long it takes to become one and the stress of it. I dont enjoy science, but i can deal with subjects and there isnt any subject that i hate with a passion. I love debating and talking, so i thought i could be a lawyer, but i dont know the pros and cons of a doctor or a lawyer. So can u explain to me how long it takes to become each one, the wage and if its really hard and stressful. Oh yh and i am mot great at english, i am trying but i ain't amazing. From the uk, so it would be better from someone, who knows how the british system of these two is.
    Go with your heart Maya and think with your brain carefully! And do research about each :P
 
 
 
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