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Comprehensive Summary of University [Contains strong language]: watch

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    Relatively Comprehensive Generalization (possible contradiction there) of University Below [Contains strong language], (requirements: ability to read more than 100 words without falling asleep):

    Good:

    - Tax Payer money you get for free more or less regardless of the income your parents earn (what I mean is that your parents can earn quite a reasonably decent salary and you may still be allowed to claim several thousand grand worth of maintenance loans, or whatever their called, which you can blow up if you're a degenerate or invest in a business or hookers etc...). In short, you can get access to finance which would be more difficult to obtain without going to university, and at a cheaper cost (i.e. low interest rates). Also, if you think you'll never have several thousand pounds worth of disposable income ever in your life, then, assuming your right, you'll have more money to spend on **** than you'll ever have.

    And all that these loans are really costing you (provided you have more loans that your need to maintain yourself, i.e. that you have a surplus once essentials have been deducted) is several books (in some cases) the odd seminar, and not failing every year (in some cases).

    BTW this is not good for the taxpayer

    - If you're a horny lad there're plenty of homesick/horny girls cramped up in a relatively small space, with free tax-payer money to invest in partying and alcohol. So it's an ideal environment to sow your seeds. Plus, it's likely, depending on where you go, that no one will know you, or that a small number of people will know you, so you can reinvent yourself - I found that most people do that (a thorough facebook search exposes the lack of authenticity in the image/personality that they project (i.e. secondary school loners who reinvent themselves as pussy gods). Why is this important? Makes it easier to get pussy, as you can hide under a persona that gets pussy, and it's likely that no one will know that you're lying.

    - Imperial/Oxbridge/Warwick/UCL/LSE (economics)/Bath (Mathematical subjects): Good for networking with kids that care about their future careers and don't want their lives reduced to "enjoying" themselves and ****ing around, though the use of the word "reduced" reflects my opinion that partying and blowing up cash on pleasure is worthless, you may hold a different opinion. Plus, in theory, there'll be less kids reinventing themselves insofar as there'll be more kids confident in their nerdiness and, save Oxbridge (Cambridge really imo), there'll be many Oxbridge rejects with something to prove, so they'll be focused and determined to succeed - either within the context of a work related career, general enterprise or academia.

    - If you've never made friends and you value it, then there are likely to be plenty of kids who are eager to become your "buddy". Some kid told me that he'd like my number because he'd find it easier to remember my name...you get the point. Plenty of kid who've never really had "mates" at secondary school, who are just as hungry for friendship as you may be.

    - Links to previous points: Last chance to become "popular". You may value it so it makes sense to include it.

    - If you learn best when someone stands on a podium and recopies his notes on a whiteboard or presents a PowerPoint to a class of 50+ student for at least an hour, then you'll receive a good education. Otherwise there's plenty of people at universities that are willing to help you. So in a sense it's 9 grand a year tuition + other loans and other sources of spending (food and **** if loans don't suffice to cover it, or if you haven't take extra loans beyond the tuition fees), if you intend to be able to make enough to repay one day that is, otherwise it costs £ 0 + other sources of spending , so probably relatively cheap tuition (depending on your expenditure).

    - Links to other points: "Social Skills". Though I could learn those for free working at a pseudo-KFC in East London. Regardless, you may value these skills at 9 grand a year + other expenses or 0 + expenses.

    - Get a taste of academia. Not much to say about that. You could obtain all info on academia online to be honest but to each his own.

    - Play for a uni sports team. Though even the ****test corners of England have a borough/county sports team. But if your local team is **** then it's worth considering, maybe (not really in my opinion, but, again, to each his own)

    - If you want to work for a company eventually, then a decent university may make that process easier, but, your employability will ultimately depend on your personal abilities and your general nature (your general competence, social skills, maybe tits if your employer's horny etc...)

    That's about it. Maybe there're more advantages, but it's a "Comprehensive Generalization", emphasis on generalization, but it's rather comprehensive as well in my opinion.



    Bad:

    - If you intend to leave university with the ability to make enough money to qualify for loan repayment, almost everything I listed above could be obtained at a cheaper cost. Plus, you'll probably spend most of your time teaching the course to yourself regardless of the university you attend or course you're enrolled in, so the tuition argument is maybe not so strong (that is if you intend to study at all). There are plenty of highly qualified tutors in every discipline that could teach you at a high academic level that you could hire privately at a lower cost, or you could teach a course you're interested in to yourself, again, at a lower cost. And similarly for the other **** like ****ing girls (i.e. you could go to a club, where entry requirements are not 300 UCAS points or A*AA but £10-£30 for an average club, or you could occasionally fork a hundred quid to **** an escort or actively 'tinder', which would only cost you internet connection) - there are plenty of horny chicks ready to **** outside of universities (if that wasn't obvious).

    In summary, it can be said that you're paying a ****load of money for activities and endeavors you could pursue outside of university. Really, even to obtain a good education you don't need to go to university.

    The only thing I value in university is networking with other competent minds but only a few, top universities have managed to generate such a social climate. You'll find that even at other top tens the general "I got so drunk" horse**** or "I talked to this girl" (wtf) or (for those who've had a bit of pussy) "I ****ed that girl" or similar statements form the substance of conversation, and ambition is low (e.g. entrepreneurial mindset is not as common as in top universities where the idea of being a wage slave, and serving to make someone richer all your life, may not be so appealing...).

    Hope you enjoyed the read x.
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    Very good read and interesting thread. Great job.
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    (Original post by okey)
    Very good read and interesting thread. Great job.

    Thanks for that. Not to blow my own trumpet but I think this is a highly important message, and people need to think carefully about the reasons why they want to go to university and the nature of university.
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    (Original post by TabulaSmaragdina)
    Thanks for that. Not to blow my own trumpet but I think this is a highly important message, and people need to think carefully about the reasons why they want to go to university and the nature of university.
    What did you study?
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    (Original post by okey)
    What did you study?
    Maths, Surrey.
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    (Original post by TabulaSmaragdina)
    Maths, Surrey.
    Interesting, thanks a lot for the read.
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    Kind of long but I generally agree with you. I don't really like university and I have come to the conclusion that sadly, and without wishing to seem pessimistic or antisocial, it's the PEOPLE that put me off more than anything.

    As you allude to people can come here and reinvent themselves etc. I find in general that there are alot of cliques at university, alot of fake people who want to look popular and cool, people who want to appear to have STATUS. I have noticed this strongly. And it just puts me off immensely. I like people for being themselves.

    I worked before so I know the working environment too and I much prefer it because what you see is what you get. Whereas at university, one minute you could be someone's friend but then they are sucking up to another group to get status, ignoring you. Something high school esque. Whereas in the working world, people are much more real. Yes there are *******s but they just act like themselves, you know? They have real responsibilities, and they have to go home and see their family and pay the bills etc

    University people are more pie in the sky. Unreliable, weak to social pressures and norms, alienating themselves from someone like me who feels no need to conform to the behaviours of the environment. Lots of people who want to be the cool kids.

    Did you find this also? Sadly I am still here for another couple of years.
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    (Original post by VergeofInsanity)
    Kind of long but I generally agree with you. I don't really like university and I have come to the conclusion that sadly, and without wishing to seem pessimistic or antisocial, it's the PEOPLE that put me off more than anything.

    As you allude to people can come here and reinvent themselves etc. I find in general that there are alot of cliques at university, alot of fake people who want to look popular and cool, people who want to appear to have STATUS. I have noticed this strongly. And it just puts me off immensely. I like people for being themselves.

    I worked before so I know the working environment too and I much prefer it because what you see is what you get. Whereas at university, one minute you could be someone's friend but then they are sucking up to another group to get status, ignoring you. Something high school esque. Whereas in the working world, people are much more real. Yes there are *******s but they just act like themselves, you know? They have real responsibilities, and they have to go home and see their family and pay the bills etc

    University people are more pie in the sky. Unreliable, weak to social pressures and norms, alienating themselves from someone like me who feels no need to conform to the behaviours of the environment. Lots of people who want to be the cool kids.

    Did you find this also? Sadly I am still here for another couple of years.
    That's essentially what I have found. The social aspect of it is exhausting in my opinion, it really does get tiring to see no sign of original, independent thought and character. In a sense it's worse than high school - esque in terms of the extent to which people try to reinvent themselves. There's just a general air of artificiality, which imo is aided by the student loans/grants which allow many to feel some sort of status, as though they've earned their money.

    I also think it's unnecessarily long and a general waste of money. A year and a half - Two years would suffice in my opinion.
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    (Original post by TabulaSmaragdina)
    - If you want to work for a company eventually, then a decent university may make that process easier, but, your employability will ultimately depend on your personal abilities and your general nature (your general competence, social skills, maybe tits if your employer's horny etc...)
    This is the part I would disagree with. With over 40% of school leavers going to university, if you enter the world of work without a degree, you will be at a real disadvantage in many fields (not all).

    In a way this is mad, as you don't actually need a degree for many jobs. Employers just use it as a marker for "oh, this person isn't a total idiot". Hotel receptionists may need a degree (in anything) now, just to distinguish themselves from less able people, even though it's irrelevant for the job. Some people see higher education as an economic bubble in that way.

    But I would not advise a school leaver who is able to go to a decent university to miss the chance, unless they had a really great plan for life that didn't need a degree.
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    (Original post by chazwomaq)
    This is the part I would disagree with. With over 40% of school leavers going to university, if you enter the world of work without a degree, you will be at a real disadvantage in many fields (not all).

    In a way this is mad, as you don't actually need a degree for many jobs. Employers just use it as a marker for "oh, this person isn't a total idiot". Hotel receptionists may need a degree (in anything) now, just to distinguish themselves from less able people, even though it's irrelevant for the job. Some people see higher education as an economic bubble in that way.

    But I would not advise a school leaver who is able to go to a decent university to miss the chance, unless they had a really great plan for life that didn't need a degree.
    Let me give you an example. In prop shop trading job adverts they say they want candidates with Msc - PhD, knowledge of C++ and other languages, and that already have lucrative trading strategies so that the main advantage of working in a prop shop would be the base salary one'd get and the access to capital which is likely to be much larger than what the average individual's likely to have access to otherwise.

    Now, imagine that you have not attended university, but you have built mathematical/statistical models with knowledge acquired from having self taught yourself maths/stats from textbooks, and you have self taught C++ and other languages, and more importantly you have designed this highly lucrative trading strategy which you can present to the prop shop's employers.

    You are proving to them that you can make them money.

    It doesn't seem to makes sense to me that they would then reject you because you don't have conventional qualifications.
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    (Original post by TabulaSmaragdina)
    Let me give you an example. In prop shop trading job adverts they say they want candidates with Msc - PhD, knowledge of C++ and other languages, and that already have lucrative trading strategies so that the main advantage of working in a prop shop would be the base salary one'd get and the access to capital which is likely to be much larger than what the average individual's likely to have access to otherwise.

    Now, imagine that you have not attended university, but you have built mathematical/statistical models with knowledge acquired from having self taught yourself maths/stats from textbooks, and you have self taught C++ and other languages, and more importantly you have designed this highly lucrative trading strategy which you can present to the prop shop's employers.

    You are proving to them that you can make them money.

    It doesn't seem to makes sense to me that they would then reject you because you don't have conventional qualifications.
    Sure, in hypothetical examples I agree with you. Skills and learning potential are important, and are often not developed by going to university more than learning yourself.

    But in the working world, it will be more difficult to get many jobs, even if you are just as clever and educated as someone with a degree.

    Part of the value of a degree is that it's a certificate i.e. validation by someone else of your achievements. You might be a genius without a degree, but how will you prove that to a potential employer so they will believe you? Often very hard in practice.
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    (Original post by chazwomaq)
    Sure, in hypothetical examples I agree with you. Skills and learning potential are important, and are often not developed by going to university more than learning yourself.

    But in the working world, it will be more difficult to get many jobs, even if you are just as clever and educated as someone with a degree.

    Part of the value of a degree is that it's a certificate i.e. validation by someone else of your achievements. You might be a genius without a degree, but how will you prove that to a potential employer so they will believe you? Often very hard in practice.
    Of course, I definitely agree with you. Imo universities should allow people to sit their exams without having to pay to attend the respective universities, as you can sit an A-level exam, of an exam board of your choice, without having to attend a particular sixth form.
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    (Original post by TabulaSmaragdina)
    That's essentially what I have found. The social aspect of it is exhausting in my opinion, it really does get tiring to see no sign of original, independent thought and character. In a sense it's worse than high school - esque in terms of the extent to which people try to reinvent themselves. There's just a general air of artificiality, which imo is aided by the student loans/grants which allow many to feel some sort of status, as though they've earned their money.

    I also think it's unnecessarily long and a general waste of money. A year and a half - Two years would suffice in my opinion.
    Glad to see I'm not alone. Couldn't put it better when you say there's a general air of artificialness. Totally spot on. People are just artifical - that is the perfect word to use. The masses behave in a way that is not actually a true representation of themselves as people. They try to portray themselves as a being that follows the social norms at university in trying to be cool, popular and the trendy guy/girl.
 
 
 
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