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Why should euthanasia be legalised in the UK? watch

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    Hi guys,

    So I have this debate at school and I will be arguing that euthanasia should be legalised. Could you please help me by giving reasons and facts as to why it should be okay for doctors to help a patient die, with the patients consent, when the patient can no longer bear the pain. This is the case for terminally-ill patients only.

    If you have any questions or points that are against my argument then please feel free to ask them/state them as they will be a big help to me.

    Also, if you any questions that I could ask the opposing team then please tell me.
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    It shouldn't be. Murder should be illegal.
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    (Original post by thexxsaiiraxx)
    Hi guys,

    So I have this debate at school and I will be arguing that euthanasia should be legalised. Could you please help me by giving reasons and facts as to why it should be okay for doctors to help a patient die, with the patients consent, when the patient can no longer bear the pain. This is the case for terminally-ill patients only.

    If you have any questions or points that are against my argument then please feel free to ask them/state them as they will be a big help to me.

    Also, if you any questions that I could ask the opposing team then please tell me.
    When an animal is terminally ill it is put down, when a human is terminally ill they are kept alive and made to suffer. Presumably this is because of human rights laws.

    The human rights need to be modified to give humans their rights. Every human has the right to die as much as they have the right to live. Keeping someone alive when there is simply no hope for them is absolutely sadistic. They dont necessarily need to be dying to be granted euthanasia, but if they are severely disabled also. A healthy person is capable of their own demise but thats another subject.
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    Because your life is your own.
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    (Original post by william walker)
    It shouldn't be. Murder should be illegal.
    Murder IS illegal??

    Also, everyone has the right to make their own decisions. So if a patient can no longer tolerate the agony and pain, and they would much rather die; why shouldn't this be okay? Why shouldn't doctors assist the patient to die quicker instead of dying a slow and painful death?
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    (Original post by william walker)
    It shouldn't be. Murder should be illegal.
    It's not murder. He's talking about legalizing assisted dying.
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    Because a person has the right to decide what happens to their body, not the government.
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    Because people who are in unending pain and suffering should have the choice to be able to end their own lives.

    We as a society, have things pretty backwards. It seems to be a case of time with us: the quicker something kills us the more shocking it is and the longer it takes, the more it slips into okayness. Thus, if someone commits suicide with a gun, their family loses insurance benefits, if he does so with cigarettes, they don't.

    Interestingly, this is exactly the opposite of what a truly humane society would conclude. Surely, by any reasonable measure, the quicker the death, the more humane and acceptable it should be.
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    Because one day my tinnitus may progress to the point where there is no more enjoyment in life, only painful misery that is incurable so not worth being here
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    (Original post by thexxsaiiraxx)
    Hi guys,

    So I have this debate at school and I will be arguing that euthanasia should be legalised. Could you please help me by giving reasons and facts as to why it should be okay for doctors to help a patient die, with the patients consent, when the patient can no longer bear the pain. This is the case for terminally-ill patients only.

    If you have any questions or points that are against my argument then please feel free to ask them/state them as they will be a big help to me.

    Also, if you any questions that I could ask the opposing team then please tell me.
    Here's a couple of reasons:

    Because it's your own life and you should have the right to decide what you do with it and when to end it.

    The denial of assisted dying is cruel. If a dog is in pain with an untreatable condition most right minded people would have the poor thing put to sleep - "put out of its misery" Why should we keep humans "in their misery" for a prolonged period of time? Who does it serve? The sufferer? The sufferer's family who watch them waste away? It doesn't serve anybody.

    It's cruel in another way. I read very recently about a British man who travelled to Switzerland to a Dignity clinic. What he really wanted to do was spend a last Christmas with his family and then be allowed to die with dignity in the UK. But since that's not possible and he wasn't sure how rapidly his disease would spread and whether he could travel to Switzerland in the New Year he decided to fly out to the clinic earlier - just a few weeks ago in fact. So he and his family were basically denied a final Christmas together.

    I am a firm believer in assisted dying - and not just for terminal patients either. For some people life is just so miserable and unbearable that they want to be let go. With adequate counselling we should give them rights over their own bodies.
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    Because there is a mandate for it. Because 80% of people in a Panorama poll (don't know how accurate this poll was) said that they agreed with the principle of Euthanasia.
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    It depends what type of euthanasia you are talking about. I agree that voluntary euthanasia should be legal as, like lots of people have said, autonomy is key! We deserve the right to decide what happens to our body.

    People in the UK have the right to deny treatment which could cause death within a matter of weeks - it may be a better option for them to end their life sooner (this could be seen as a form of passive euthanasia). Also, it's an argument I hate using but you need to think about justice. The NHS is in a financial crisis right now and palliative care averages at around £7000 per year per person, is it really worth keeping someone alive and spending all that money when they do not want to be alive?

    Also, prescribing morphine could be seen as an example of active euthanasia. Okay, the doctor is giving them the drug with their best interests at heart (trying to reduce pain), but high doses of morphine, or any opiate for that matter, is toxic and can slowly kill a patient.

    There is the very heavy argument about the slippery slope and people dying unnecessarily, however I think this would only occur with involuntary euthanasia. If voluntary euthanasia is made legal, there would have to be lots of legislation put in place, and many people to consult before the patient is given consent to be euthanised (e.g doctors, nurses, family, courts, etc).

    Another common argument for euthanasia, is that suicide is legal. By making VOLUNTARY euthanasia illegal, you're only erecting barriers to those who cannot end their life by themselves. Those that are able, can kill themselves or travel to Switzerland, however those that are bed bound and seriously disabled have no way of ending their life legally.

    (Sorry for the essay, I hope this helps)!
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    Yeah OP I think you should go for it.
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    Right to live= Right to die.
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    The "Right to die" is a no brainer for me.
    All the arguments against are either religious, "what ifs" or slippery slope fallacies.
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    (Original post by thexxsaiiraxx)
    Hi guys,

    So I have this debate at school and I will be arguing that euthanasia should be legalised. Could you please help me by giving reasons and facts as to why it should be okay for doctors to help a patient die, with the patients consent, when the patient can no longer bear the pain. This is the case for terminally-ill patients only.

    If you have any questions or points that are against my argument then please feel free to ask them/state them as they will be a big help to me.

    Also, if you any questions that I could ask the opposing team then please tell me.

    Points in favour


    It should be the choice of a patient whether they wish to die or not, and if they feel that they are in too much pain or that they simply wish to die, then their wish should be granted provided all alternatives have been offered to them, such as palliative care.

    We value life because we have future plans and desires that we want fulfilled, and because we're happy and feel that we have more pleasure in life than pain. For terminally ill patients, they have no future plans and pain probably outweighs pleasure for them, which is why they want to end their lives.

    Furthermore, making physician-assisted suicide legal provides comfort to people who know that the option is there if they need it. In Oregon, one in fifty patients talk to their doctor about it, and one in six talk with family members, suggesting that the availability of such an escape may be much more important to many patients than its actual use. Indeed, patients in Oregon are 100 times more likely to merely consider assisted suicide rather than actually follow through with it. (See Tolle et al., 2004, for instance)

    Points that you may come up against

    Opponents of voluntary euthanasia might argue that legalising it may lead to a 'slippery slope', whereby the elderly are coerced into giving their consent to die, perhaps for financial gain.

    However, empirical evidence currently suggests that proponents of this argument are engaging in the slippery slope fallacy – a 2009 review study conducted by the Dutch government into the euthanasia system in the Netherlands concluded that “no slippery slope seems to have occurred”. Similarly, another 2009 study found that “euthanasia practices have evolved in such a way that patients are more likely to talk about euthanasia than to die a euthanasia death”, suggesting that abuse of the system is rare.

    A 2010 study similarly concluded that, were assisted suicide or voluntary euthanasia to be legalised in the United Kingdom, “there is no evidence that legalizing [it] will lead us down the slippery slope to involuntary euthanasia.”

    Opponents also often present a false dichotomy between palliative care and assisted suicide – it's perfectly possible to have widespread palliative care along with legal assisted suicide. In Oregon, for example, 86% of those who took the option of physician-assisted suicide in 2013 were already receiving palliative care. From 1998-2012, 90.5% of people were already receiving palliative care.

    Therefore, opponents of assisted suicide ignore the reality of the situation, because in many cases, no amount of palliative care can relieve the suffering and agony that many terminally ill people go through as they end their lives.

    Good luck in the debate.
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    Rather than setting out your case - for a debate you'll need to do your research on your opponents case and come up with arguments against their likely points.

    For that have a look at
    http://bma.org.uk/support-at-work/et...assisted-dying (it'd be difficult to have a law allowing assisted dying when the vast majority of doctors who would have to carry out the procedure are opposed).

    http://www.scope.org.uk/media/scope-...sisted-suicide

    http://www.carenotkilling.org.uk/about/ and http://www.carenotkilling.org.uk/about/faqs/

    http://www.huffingtonpost.co.uk/mik-...b_5472241.html (a very good discussion of the issues around consent in medical procedures)

    http://www.theguardian.com/commentis...ng-bill-reject
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    (Original post by william walker)
    It shouldn't be. Murder should be illegal.
    Murder is the unlawful killing of a person.
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    (Original post by viddy9)
    Points in favour

    It should be the choice of a patient whether they wish to die or not, and if they feel that they are in too much pain or that they simply wish to die, then their wish should be granted provided all alternatives have been offered to them, such as palliative care.

    We value life because we have future plans and desires that we want fulfilled, and because we're happy and feel that we have more pleasure in life than pain. For terminally ill patients, they have no future plans and pain probably outweighs pleasure for them, which is why they want to end their lives.

    Furthermore, making physician-assisted suicide legal provides comfort to people who know that the option is there if they need it. In Oregon, one in fifty patients talk to their doctor about it, and one in six talk with family members, suggesting that the availability of such an escape may be much more important to many patients than its actual use. Indeed, patients in Oregon are 100 times more likely to merely consider assisted suicide rather than actually follow through with it. (See Tolle et al., 2004, for instance)

    Points that you may come up against

    Opponents of voluntary euthanasia might argue that legalising it may lead to a 'slippery slope', whereby the elderly are coerced into giving their consent to die, perhaps for financial gain.

    However, empirical evidence currently suggests that proponents of this argument are engaging in the slippery slope fallacy – a 2009 review study conducted by the Dutch government into the euthanasia system in the Netherlands concluded that “no slippery slope seems to have occurred”. Similarly, another 2009 study found that “euthanasia practices have evolved in such a way that patients are more likely to talk about euthanasia than to die a euthanasia death”, suggesting that abuse of the system is rare.

    A 2010 study similarly concluded that, were assisted suicide or voluntary euthanasia to be legalised in the United Kingdom, “there is no evidence that legalizing [it] will lead us down the slippery slope to involuntary euthanasia.”

    Opponents also often present a false dichotomy between palliative care and assisted suicide – it's perfectly possible to have widespread palliative care along with legal assisted suicide. In Oregon, for example, 86% of those who took the option of physician-assisted suicide in 2013 were already receiving palliative care. From 1998-2012, 90.5% of people were already receiving palliative care.

    Therefore, opponents of assisted suicide ignore the reality of the situation, because in many cases, no amount of palliative care can relieve the suffering and agony that many terminally ill people go through as they end their lives.

    Good luck in the debate.
    OMG THANK YOUU SO MUCHH

    This is actually so helpful!!
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    (Original post by thexxsaiiraxx)
    OMG THANK YOUU SO MUCHH

    This is actually so helpful!!
    No problem. I'm a bit sad so I document all the evidence concerning a lot of different issues, but when it came to euthanasia, it at least came in handy when I volunteered to debate in favour of euthanasia at my school's RE day in front of one of the lower years.
 
 
 
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