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    Finally got my hands on a copy of this from the central library last week. The librarian went down to the stores to get it, it was published in the 60s and looks and feels ancient. As awesome as it feels to read a version of a classic this old, though, I feel like the translation might be a bit too archaic, and was wondering whether I should continue reading it or just find a more modern one.

    To those that have read both versions of a particular classic translated into English, have you ever found that an older translation took away some of the enjoyment/pleasure that the newer version preserved? Are you generally bothered about what kind of translation you read?
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    Bumpity bump.
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    I have a new version, but my dad has a 1900s copy, and the text isn't too different. Obviously, there are differences in wording, but my new copy is still old-fashioned in tone etc

    Your best bet is to get a copy with footnotes, then you can enjoy the poetry-ness of it without having to constantly stop for a dictionary
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    (Original post by Vicky628)
    I have a new version, but my dad has a 1900s copy, and the text isn't too different. Obviously, there are differences in wording, but my new copy is still old-fashioned in tone etc

    Your best bet is to get a copy with footnotes, then you can enjoy the poetry-ness of it without having to constantly stop for a dictionary
    Didn't really think about footnotes, might just do that; seems like a decent compromise between the two. Thanks, Vicky.
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    The only thing I even know about this is what's written in Dan Brown's book Inferno :lol:
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    I've been in this very position with the Divine Comedy before. I went through three versions and I'm still not happy...

    It all started when I received a gift of the full scholarly Italian version from some relatives of mine. I battled through, and although the language was beautiful it was also inpenetrable. I had very little idea what was going on. I then moved on to a copy of the Longfellow translation; I gave up a few cantos in because I could just tell it wasn't going to end well. Finally in desperation I tried another translation I found free on the internet (I can't remember the translator for the life of me) which seemed to fit me like a glove. It really is a matter of finding one that suits you.

    It might also be worth bearing in mind that a quite wonderful translation by John Ciardi exists, which preserves both the story and the rhyme structure. I've only read snatches of it but it looks very promising.

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