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Should I go to university to university even if I won't get into a top one watch

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    Hey guys,

    Been reading through threads on here and almost every thread has someone who is getting AAB or AAA and is going to Oxbridge, LSE, Warwick etc etc.

    I got BCD and a merit in AS levels which obviously isn't good enough to go to these universites. I dropped A-Level IT and I think next year I could at best get an A in Business Studies, a distinction* in OCR IT and a B in English and at worst a B in Business, distinction* in OCR IT and a C in English.

    Alongside these I also have to do the Welsh Baccalaureate which I would expect to get an A in but it's not always accepted by universities.

    The uni's I've been looking at that I have a realistic chance of getting into are the likes of Swansea, Bristol UWE, Manchester Met, Portsmouth etc. Maybe I will apply for one upper echelon university just as a gamble in the unlikely event I do really well.

    Is there any point in going to university? If the degree isn't from a top university will I be able to secure a decent job related to the degree?

    Interested in Economics
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    (Original post by rvcfever)
    Hey guys,

    Been reading through threads on here and almost every thread has someone who is getting AAB or AAA and is going to Oxbridge, LSE, Warwick etc etc.

    I got BCD and a merit in AS levels which obviously isn't good enough to go to these universites. I dropped A-Level IT and I think next year I could at best get an A in Business Studies, a distinction* in OCR IT and a B in English and at worst a B in Business, distinction* in OCR IT and a C in English.

    Alongside these I also have to do the Welsh Baccalaureate which I would expect to get an A in but it's not always accepted by universities.

    The uni's I've been looking at that I have a realistic chance of getting into are the likes of Swansea, Bristol UWE, Manchester Met, Portsmouth etc. Maybe I will apply for one upper echelon university just as a gamble in the unlikely event I do really well.

    Is there any point in going to university? If the degree isn't from a top university will I be able to secure a decent job related to the degree?

    Interested in Economics
    Good question.

    1. You've still got exams to sit so don't worry about AS, give it your best shot.
    2. Realistically with BCD you can improve quite a bit. You need to reach that magic 300-320+ ucas points ideally
    3. Don't just pick a uni based upon ranking alone actually visit and see if it's for you.
    4. Also look at grad emploment if all you're interested about is securing a job. Some "lower tier unis" have great employment stats as they have better links with industry.

    Bill.
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    Yes. Of course. University is a wonderful experience and you should go.

    I go to the University of Plymouth, and I'm glad that I do. I've made so many friends and had a good time.

    Most people get into universities with Cs or even Ds at A-Level. There's access courses to get into university, and A-Level grades become irrelevantonce you start.

    Heck, I got BBD at A-Level. B in History. B in Mathematics. D in Physics. Some extenuating circumstances but I can't change it. Yes, I wish I could have changed my A-Levels and done History, Mathematics, Government and Politics and English, but you know, my A-Levels were not a true reflection of my ability.

    Got 68% in my first year. Went on an exchange to Idaho State University and got a 3.84 GPA over two semesters. Now in my third year...
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    (Original post by jammy4041)
    .

    Got 68% in my first year. Went on an exchange to Idaho State University and got a 3.84 GPA over two semesters. Now in my third year...
    Thanks for the reply. Do you think your year abroad was beneficial? Always wanted to study in the US but I'm being steered towards doing a year in the industry instead as I think the experience might benefit me more.
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    (Original post by Bill_Gates)
    Good question.

    1. You've still got exams to sit so don't worry about AS, give it your best shot.
    2. Realistically with BCD you can improve quite a bit. You need to reach that magic 300-320+ ucas points ideally
    3. Don't just pick a uni based upon ranking alone actually visit and see if it's for you.
    4. Also look at grad emploment if all you're interested about is securing a job. Some "lower tier unis" have great employment stats as they have better links with industry.

    Bill.
    yeah to be honest I didn't revise as much as I could have and got caught up in the whole "didn't revise for my GCSE's and did alright so I'll do it again"

    Yeah Swansea's graduate employment is supposed to be very good, as is Portsmouth's.
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    (Original post by rvcfever)
    Thanks for the reply. Do you think your year abroad was beneficial? Always wanted to study in the US but I'm being steered towards doing a year in the industry instead as I think the experience might benefit me more.
    Hands down the best decision I made at university. Since I study History, it really helped. I have a keen interest in American history and I did so much.

    From my conversation with the exchange co-ordinator at Plymouth, she did mention that is possible to go on an exchange year even if you're on an economics course, but it's harder. There's different ways of doing things between the UK and the US, but it sure looks great on a future CV I'd guess.
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    What do you want to do in life?

    Now think if a university course is the best way of achieving it.
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    (Original post by Incongruous)
    What do you want to do in life?

    Now think if a university course is the best way of achieving it.
    Make enough money to enjoy myself. If I was able to go a top university it would be a no brainer but idk what opportunities are like for those who go mid tier uni's.
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    (Original post by jammy4041)
    Hands down the best decision I made at university. Since I study History, it really helped. I have a keen interest in American history and I did so much.

    From my conversation with the exchange co-ordinator at Plymouth, she did mention that is possible to go on an exchange year even if you're on an economics course, but it's harder. There's different ways of doing things between the UK and the US, but it sure looks great on a future CV I'd guess.
    Yeah I guess I'd have to see. Did your student loans cover your year there?
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    (Original post by rvcfever)
    Make enough money to enjoy myself. If I was able to go a top university it would be a no brainer but idk what opportunities are like for those who go mid tier uni's.
    Again that's really vague. People who earn a lot of money usually earn it because they are good at something which is well paid.

    Graduates from better universities earn more on average, but a good university isn't imperative to earn a good living.
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    (Original post by jammy4041)
    Hands down the best decision I made at university. Since I study History, it really helped. I have a keen interest in American history and I did so much.

    From my conversation with the exchange co-ordinator at Plymouth, she did mention that is possible to go on an exchange year even if you're on an economics course, but it's harder. There's different ways of doing things between the UK and the US, but it sure looks great on a future CV I'd guess.
    Sorry for interrupting... I'm in my second year of A-Levels atm and have applied to University. How did you decide where to go on your time abroad? I'm currently thinking Canada. Glad you're enjoying it though
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    (Original post by rvcfever)
    Yeah I guess I'd have to see. Did your student loans cover your year there?
    Because I went on a direct exchange program to ISU, student finance generally cover me. Plymouth and Idaho State had a long standing agreement. It was a bit difficult, and I needed some extra funds, but I had worked in the summer between first year and going away to try and build something. Tuition fees, paid by student finance plummeted to like £750, and I met the cost of ISU's tuition with an exchange waiver, and through the enhanced student finance loan. Travel costs minus the first £300 were also reimbursed, which was welcome. On the other hand, I was eligible for a grant as well as all of that funding, and I got some funding from my parents as and when I needed it.

    If you go through ISEP or something, it is different. A lot of universities do have significant numbers go on exchange years, and they have well developed international groups, and longstanding exchange partnerships. So, when looking at universities, it could be something to consider. Some courses may build in a year on exchange in any case. And yes, there's other places to go to as well.

    (Original post by emiloujess)
    Sorry for interrupting... I'm in my second year of A-Levels atm and have applied to University. How did you decide where to go on your time abroad? I'm currently thinking Canada. Glad you're enjoying it though
    Well, my time in America came to an end in June. I had an absolute blast. I really enjoyed it and it was humbling to have met friends from all around the world. From Trinidad, Jamaica,Nepal, the US, Germany, Sweden, Mexico, China and Uruguay. I still try to keep in contact with them as much as I can -- as hard as it is.

    I guess, trying to pin something down, the year that I was applying to university was the year that tutiton fees tripled to £9,000 a year, and I was seriously looking at applying to universities in the Netherlands. Nothing came of that, since my parents really wanted me to stay in the UK. I knew that I wanted to take a year out, before going to university, even while I was in sixth form, but it was when I went to a couple of the open days when I really picked up the opportunity that was available, and this time my parents were really supportive. While I was on my gap year earning some money, my sister spent three months in South Africa helping children learn English, and she had an amazing time.

    I was always a bit of an Americanphile, and I absolutely adored American history. It was the most stimulating thing that I found in sixth form anyway, and in GCSE history. So, when I finished my year out (which was spent mostly working), and went to Plymouth, such an opportunity was communicated to us very early in the year and I got involved in the process. Plymouth has partnered up with Plymouth State (in New Hampshire), Longwood (in Virginia), The University of Mississippi (Aka, Ole Miss, but that's so hard to get on an exchange), Nebraska Wesleyan (a very small liberal arts university, in Lincoln, NE on the opposite side of town to the University of Nebraska), Idaho State University and Montana State University.

    I wanted to go out west, but what really sealed it for me was the quick and helpful response from those at Idaho State, from the Chair of History to the guy who really helped get my application through as quick as possible. In fairness, one of my best friends at Plymouth also said that he was looking at Idaho State. He didn't go through with it in the end, but he's more-than-just-a-little bitter that I effectively 'stole' his idea. In fairness, I couldn't have really gone wrong, and a few of my course-mates who also went on exhanges to some of the various institutions had very positive outlooks on their experiences.

    Now, I've always wanted to go to Canada, but wherever you go, it will be amazing. When you make your visits to universities on their open days, do take the time to see what they do, exchange wise, and where the opportunities can take you.
 
 
 
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