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    Hello everyone I am new to this forum so I apologise if I have posted this thread in the wrong place.

    My story is the classic 'kid being forced to do a course his parents wanted him to' - and yes... that course is Medicine. Since it was Medicine that they wanted me to do I ended up taking Chemistry, Biology, Physics and Computer Science for AS.

    Unfortunately I got CBCB. It was expected since I felt very demotivated knowing that I am working towards a life I did not want to live. I am also not a 'gifted and talented' student and achieved very average GCSEs with 2A*s 3As 4Bs 2Cs.

    I don't want to do Medicine... blood makes me queasy and I have a rather irrational fear of vomiting. I have come to the conclusion that I want to do Physics (maybe with astrophysics) at University - however my foundation in Maths is not very solid and has many gaps in it due to moving schools, bad teachers, not understanding anything etcetera.

    I achieved a B in GCSE Maths but I still felt that I wouldn't be able to handle A-level Maths simply because I didn't feel confident enough that I had the basics down. I still find it difficult to help my younger siblings with their GCSE Maths homework. I did Physics at AS and I loved it - however again there were various reasons as to why I didn't do well but I achieved As in past papers and class tests throughout the year. However I am aware that the A-level Physics course is designed for students to be able to complete it with merely GCSE Maths knowledge - and that is probably not the case at University.

    Since the Maths in A2 Physics was going to be a lot more advanced and I hadn't taken Maths, and because I was aiming for Medicine, I dropped it. Now I feel very depressed as my life is heading in a direction I don't want it to, and I won't get there anyway since Universities want As and A*s for Medicine and I got Bs and Cs.

    Anyway - I have decided to stand my ground and now I am determined to do Physics at Uni but is it too late? How can I do it when I don't have the grades AND I don't have the right subjects? I know for Physics courses they prefer Further Maths too - I can't even do GCSE Maths. Would I have to resit my GCSE Maths, work on my basics, then redo my A-levels with Maths, Physics, Further Maths? That would take another 3 years wouldn't it?

    Can someone point me in a direction? What would you do in my position?

    Thank you all in advance
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    Anybody willing to give advice?
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    If you're determined to do it..
    Retake AS-levels from the start. Take Physics and maths and then whatever you want. Whilst further maths is always good to do for physics it isn't necessary.

    That's my take on things anyway
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    (Original post by user_input)
    Hello everyone I am new to this forum so I apologise if I have posted this thread in the wrong place.

    My story is the classic 'kid being forced to do a course his parents wanted him to' - and yes... that course is Medicine. Since it was Medicine that they wanted me to do I ended up taking Chemistry, Biology, Physics and Computer Science for AS.

    Unfortunately I got CBCB. It was expected since I felt very demotivated knowing that I am working towards a life I did not want to live. I am also not a 'gifted and talented' student and achieved very average GCSEs with 2A*s 3As 4Bs 2Cs.

    I don't want to do Medicine... blood makes me queasy and I have a rather irrational fear of vomiting. I have come to the conclusion that I want to do Physics (maybe with astrophysics) at University - however my foundation in Maths is not very solid and has many gaps in it due to moving schools, bad teachers, not understanding anything etcetera.

    I achieved a B in GCSE Maths but I still felt that I wouldn't be able to handle A-level Maths simply because I didn't feel confident enough that I had the basics down. I still find it difficult to help my younger siblings with their GCSE Maths homework. I did Physics at AS and I loved it - however again there were various reasons as to why I didn't do well but I achieved As in past papers and class tests throughout the year. However I am aware that the A-level Physics course is designed for students to be able to complete it with merely GCSE Maths knowledge - and that is probably not the case at University.

    Since the Maths in A2 Physics was going to be a lot more advanced and I hadn't taken Maths, and because I was aiming for Medicine, I dropped it. Now I feel very depressed as my life is heading in a direction I don't want it to, and I won't get there anyway since Universities want As and A*s for Medicine and I got Bs and Cs.

    Anyway - I have decided to stand my ground and now I am determined to do Physics at Uni but is it too late? How can I do it when I don't have the grades AND I don't have the right subjects? I know for Physics courses they prefer Further Maths too - I can't even do GCSE Maths. Would I have to resit my GCSE Maths, work on my basics, then redo my A-levels with Maths, Physics, Further Maths? That would take another 3 years wouldn't it?

    Can someone point me in a direction? What would you do in my position?

    Thank you all in advance
    Are you in Year 13? With the changes in A level sylabuses why don't you look at a Foundation year and then do a Physics degree -
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    It wouldn't take three years because you can sit your GCSE on top of whatever else you choose to do? Good luck!
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    You could do a foundation year, or just pick a broader degree {ie natural sciences rather than a specific science} and narrow your interests down in the 2nd/3rd year, which would give you more choice
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    (Original post by user_input)
    Hello everyone I am new to this forum so I apologise if I have posted this thread in the wrong place.

    My story is the classic 'kid being forced to do a course his parents wanted him to' - and yes... that course is Medicine. Since it was Medicine that they wanted me to do I ended up taking Chemistry, Biology, Physics and Computer Science for AS.

    Unfortunately I got CBCB. It was expected since I felt very demotivated knowing that I am working towards a life I did not want to live. I am also not a 'gifted and talented' student and achieved very average GCSEs with 2A*s 3As 4Bs 2Cs.

    I don't want to do Medicine... blood makes me queasy and I have a rather irrational fear of vomiting. I have come to the conclusion that I want to do Physics (maybe with astrophysics) at University - however my foundation in Maths is not very solid and has many gaps in it due to moving schools, bad teachers, not understanding anything etcetera.

    I achieved a B in GCSE Maths but I still felt that I wouldn't be able to handle A-level Maths simply because I didn't feel confident enough that I had the basics down. I still find it difficult to help my younger siblings with their GCSE Maths homework. I did Physics at AS and I loved it - however again there were various reasons as to why I didn't do well but I achieved As in past papers and class tests throughout the year. However I am aware that the A-level Physics course is designed for students to be able to complete it with merely GCSE Maths knowledge - and that is probably not the case at University.

    Since the Maths in A2 Physics was going to be a lot more advanced and I hadn't taken Maths, and because I was aiming for Medicine, I dropped it. Now I feel very depressed as my life is heading in a direction I don't want it to, and I won't get there anyway since Universities want As and A*s for Medicine and I got Bs and Cs.

    Anyway - I have decided to stand my ground and now I am determined to do Physics at Uni but is it too late? How can I do it when I don't have the grades AND I don't have the right subjects? I know for Physics courses they prefer Further Maths too - I can't even do GCSE Maths. Would I have to resit my GCSE Maths, work on my basics, then redo my A-levels with Maths, Physics, Further Maths? That would take another 3 years wouldn't it?

    Can someone point me in a direction? What would you do in my position?

    Thank you all in advance
    You have to decide whether you want to please you or your parents. I'm applying for medicine this application round and I can tell you it's not an easy ride (i.e. a pain in the ****).

    I'd resit all the AS units which brought your grades down, get good predictions and apply for something else if it's not too late. Have you looked into, as a little birdie told me physics is basically applying multivariable calc, partial derivatives, dynamics, abstract algebra to real-life contexts, so if you're not strong at maths, it's probably not the best idea. Besides, most unis will expect maths and further.

    Have you looked at other natural sciences courses that are less mathsy? Biology or biochemistry maybe if you're prepared to get an A or A* at A-level in them?
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    (Original post by The Wavefunction)
    If you're determined to do it..
    Retake AS-levels from the start. Take Physics and maths and then whatever you want. Whilst further maths is always good to do for physics it isn't necessary.

    That's my take on things anyway
    Thank you for the response. I am determined and I do feel that this is the best way to do it as it helps close any missing gaps and develop it further. However since I have taken AS Maths and the new linear system has been implemented - do you know what would happen to my Physics grade? Would I be able to retake those modules from the 'old system' or would I have to have 2 A-levels in Physics?

    Again, thank you for the help

    (Original post by Muttley79)
    Are you in Year 13? With the changes in A level sylabuses why don't you look at a Foundation year and then do a Physics degree -
    Thank you for the response. Yes I am in year 13 and I did consider a foundation year but I may be overwhelmed with all the new Maths I will be rushing through and I don't know if I could keep up. Also from my understanding foundation courses are more competitive right?

    (Original post by sadface)
    It wouldn't take three years because you can sit your GCSE on top of whatever else you choose to do? Good luck!
    Thank you for the response - yes I may just revise the GCSE topics to refresh my memory while working on the AS but without actually sitting the exam.

    (Original post by Vicky628)
    You could do a foundation year, or just pick a broader degree {ie natural sciences rather than a specific science} and narrow your interests down in the 2nd/3rd year, which would give you more choice
    Thank you for the response. I really would like to study pure Physics or Physics with Astrophysics - I also dislike Biology so I don't want to study courses that involves much of it. Thank you for the advice anyway.

    (Original post by Cadherin)
    You have to decide whether you want to please you or your parents. I'm applying for medicine this application round and I can tell you it's not an easy ride (i.e. a pain in the ****).

    I'd resit all the AS units which brought your grades down, get good predictions and apply for something else if it's not too late. Have you looked into, as a little birdie told me physics is basically applying multivariable calc, partial derivatives, dynamics, abstract algebra to real-life contexts, so if you're not strong at maths, it's probably not the best idea. Besides, most unis will expect maths and further.

    Have you looked at other natural sciences courses that are less mathsy? Biology or biochemistry maybe if you're prepared to get an A or A* at A-level in them?
    Thank you for the response. I understand I was being foolish by just blindly taking my parents' advice without thinking about the future. I do know about the Medicine application process as I researched it extensively back in year 12. I am currently retaking the units that brought me down and aiming to bring my grades up to As this year. I have been predicted BBC which I cannot do anything with, therefore I am waiting until I receive my results in order to apply with my achieved grades. I do understand that my weaknesses in Maths will hold me back which is why I am leaning more towards starting from scratch and learning Maths again rather than jumping into a Foundation Degree. I wouldn't mind studying Maths and Further Maths at GCSE, AS and A2 as I would work harder to consolidate the knowledge and understand the concepts.

    I dislike Biology so I definitely do not want to do something related to Biology - I do enjoy Chemistry though but I really do want to study Physics (with Astrophysics) and wouldn't mind being set back 3 years because of it. I am already studying Chemistry, Biology and Computing at A2 so I will try my best to make those As, and then I will dedicate my gap year to Physics and Maths (I have already got an AS in Physics so I don't know what will happen to that) and maybe Further Maths too and try to get As in those too. The requirements for Physics with Astrophysics are AAB so it shouldn't be too difficult to achieve.

    Anyway thank you for the response, I do appreciate it.
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    (Original post by user_input)

    Thank you for the response. Yes I am in year 13 and I did consider a foundation year but I may be overwhelmed with all the new Maths I will be rushing through and I don't know if I could keep up. Also from my understanding foundation courses are more competitive right?

    .
    Here is a course at random - I think it looks perfect for you.

    http://www.lboro.ac.uk/study/undergr...cs-foundation/
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    (Original post by user_input)
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    Hi there, I'm sorry to hear that your AS results didn't come out as good as you expected.

    Do a Physics foundation year? Just a quick search has good unis like Manchester and York offering a "year zero". It's costly though, but if that's the route you're determined to take then I'm all for you doing this.
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    Oh yeah I didn't think of a foundation year for some reason until that other person suggested it, seems like the perfect solution for you though.

    Example from Manchester:

    ""Would you like to study here but don't have the right entry qualifications? Why not consider a Foundation Year course?

    The Integrated Foundation Year is "year zero" of a four or five year course leading to a degree from one of the schools of science or engineering at the University of Manchester.""
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    (Original post by Muttley79)
    Here is a course at random - I think it looks perfect for you.

    http://www.lboro.ac.uk/study/undergr...cs-foundation/
    (Original post by thecatwithnohat)
    Hi there, I'm sorry to hear that your AS results didn't come out as good as you expected.

    Do a Physics foundation year? Just a quick search has good unis like Manchester and York offering a "year zero". It's costly though, but if that's the route you're determined to take then I'm all for you doing this.
    Thank you both. I am now left with the decision of whether to do a foundation year or to redo my A-levels and apply directly to the degree. What would you do in my position?
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    (Original post by user_input)
    Thank you both. I am now left with the decision of whether to do a foundation year or to redo my A-levels and apply directly to the degree. What would you do in my position?
    Personally I'd go to uni - it costs more but the course teaches you the stuff you need for the degree. It will get you away from home too.
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    (Original post by user_input)
    Thank you both. I am now left with the decision of whether to do a foundation year or to redo my A-levels and apply directly to the degree. What would you do in my position?
    Well .. it's been two months and the syllabus will clearly be different (depending on your subjects) so if you'll have quite a bit of work to catch up on!

    You'll need to think about it. Would you be willing to do a foundation year? The tuition fee is around £5,000 I think so it's evidently cheaper since you're not actually doing the uni course in question. All I can say is you shouldn't apply to unis which are way above your target grades (BBC or BBB at a stretch) which cuts out quite a large chunk of pretty good universities so you might as well do a foundation year at a good uni and then progress onto the course (should you be successful on the foundation course, you'll need to get like 65/70% in the exam to move on to year 1)
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    (Original post by Muttley79)
    Personally I'd go to uni - it costs more but the course teaches you the stuff you need for the degree. It will get you away from home too.
    (Original post by thecatwithnohat)
    Well .. it's been two months and the syllabus will clearly be different (depending on your subjects) so if you'll have quite a bit of work to catch up on!

    You'll need to think about it. Would you be willing to do a foundation year? The tuition fee is around £5,000 I think so it's evidently cheaper since you're not actually doing the uni course in question. All I can say is you shouldn't apply to unis which are way above your target grades (BBC or BBB at a stretch) which cuts out quite a large chunk of pretty good universities.
    Thank you for the response. I think I will give the foundation year a try. I'll work very hard in order to get the BBC grades to AAA so I have a wider range of universities I can apply to. This means I'll take a gap year as well which shouldn't be too much of an issue as I can work and save up for the foundation year and get some good experience.

    Thank you all so much for your help.
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    (Original post by user_input)
    Thank you for the response. I think I will give the foundation year a try. I'll work very hard in order to get the BBC grades to AAA so I have a wider range of universities I can apply to. This means I'll take a gap year as well which shouldn't be too much of an issue as I can work and save up for the foundation year and get some good experience.

    Thank you all so much for your help.
    Taking a gap year would be brilliant! If that is what you plan to do, you have two options:

    1) If you get the high grades that you want with resits and all, you can take your gap year and apply to the universities directly (and you'll most likely get an offer since you've already attained the grades!)

    or

    2) If you don't get the grades you need, you can easily just get a full-time / part-time job and you'll probably get some financial support from the uni too should you need it. The foundation year will equip you with the skills you didn't attain during your A levels so hopefully you'll do well and progress onto the Physics course!
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    (Original post by user_input)
    Thank you for the response. I think I will give the foundation year a try. I'll work very hard in order to get the BBC grades to AAA so I have a wider range of universities I can apply to. This means I'll take a gap year as well which shouldn't be too much of an issue as I can work and save up for the foundation year and get some good experience.

    Thank you all so much for your help.
    Entry grades for a Foundation year aren't that high - you could go next year. Why don't you check out a few unis you are interested in?
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    (Original post by thecatwithnohat)
    Taking a gap year would be brilliant! If that is what you plan to do, you have two options:

    1) If you get the high grades that you want with resits and all, you can take your gap year and apply to the universities directly (and you'll most likely get an offer since you've already attained the grades!)

    or

    2) If you don't get the grades you need, you can easily just get a full-time / part-time job and you'll probably get some financial support from the uni too should you need it. The foundation year will equip you with the skills you didn't attain during your A levels so hopefully you'll do well and progress onto the Physics course!
    (Original post by Muttley79)
    Entry grades for a Foundation year aren't that high - you could go next year. Why don't you check out a few unis you are interested in?
    Hmmm I will do more research on the subject but I have always wanted to take a gap year after year 13 anyway, and since I am predicted BBC (which I think are not accurate and hope to prove the school wrong) I want to apply with (hopefully) better A2 grades in hand. But I will look into it, thank you.
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    (Original post by user_input)
    Hello everyone I am new to this forum so I apologise if I have posted this thread in the wrong place.

    My story is the classic 'kid being forced to do a course his parents wanted him to' - and yes... that course is Medicine. Since it was Medicine that they wanted me to do I ended up taking Chemistry, Biology, Physics and Computer Science for AS.

    Unfortunately I got CBCB. It was expected since I felt very demotivated knowing that I am working towards a life I did not want to live. I am also not a 'gifted and talented' student and achieved very average GCSEs with 2A*s 3As 4Bs 2Cs.

    I don't want to do Medicine... blood makes me queasy and I have a rather irrational fear of vomiting. I have come to the conclusion that I want to do Physics (maybe with astrophysics) at University - however my foundation in Maths is not very solid and has many gaps in it due to moving schools, bad teachers, not understanding anything etcetera.

    I achieved a B in GCSE Maths but I still felt that I wouldn't be able to handle A-level Maths simply because I didn't feel confident enough that I had the basics down. I still find it difficult to help my younger siblings with their GCSE Maths homework. I did Physics at AS and I loved it - however again there were various reasons as to why I didn't do well but I achieved As in past papers and class tests throughout the year. However I am aware that the A-level Physics course is designed for students to be able to complete it with merely GCSE Maths knowledge - and that is probably not the case at University.

    Since the Maths in A2 Physics was going to be a lot more advanced and I hadn't taken Maths, and because I was aiming for Medicine, I dropped it. Now I feel very depressed as my life is heading in a direction I don't want it to, and I won't get there anyway since Universities want As and A*s for Medicine and I got Bs and Cs.

    Anyway - I have decided to stand my ground and now I am determined to do Physics at Uni but is it too late? How can I do it when I don't have the grades AND I don't have the right subjects? I know for Physics courses they prefer Further Maths too - I can't even do GCSE Maths. Would I have to resit my GCSE Maths, work on my basics, then redo my A-levels with Maths, Physics, Further Maths? That would take another 3 years wouldn't it?

    Can someone point me in a direction? What would you do in my position?

    Thank you all in advance
    Hey,
    I'm in year 13 now and at the end of year 12 I was kind of in the same boat as you. I took biology, chemistry, maths and Latin with the intention of pursuing a degree in a medicine. however, I quickly realised it was not for me and switched to a classics degree. Luckily for me though I had taken Latin which was what I needed to apply, but I understand that for you it's a little different.

    First and foremost, you need to understand NOTHING is too late in life, believe me - when I switched degrees right at the end of year 12 I felt so lost, just like you. If I were in your position I would start 6th form again from scratch so that you do the right subjects and improve your grades to stand a better chance of getting in ( I think it would be way too stressful to resist AS exams whilst studying for A2 exams). You've already mentioned that for a physics degree they like the combination of physics, maths and further maths, but that you're not very good at maths. So you have two options: take a gamble and take physics, maths and further maths A levels even though you aren't that strong at maths. OR take physics, maths and an level in any other subject that you like (maybe even something 'recreational' like art) - you say they like further maths, but I looked at the Oxford university website criteria for physics just as an example of what a top uni wants and they were happy with just maths, physics and an a level in any other subject for a physics degree, so you DON'T have to take further maths, and I would advise you not to if you think maths is not your strong point - why make it more difficult for yourself?
    Regarding whether you should take do maths GCSE again, no I personally don't think you need to, regardless of whether you end up taking further maths or not. The stuff you learn on the AS level and A level syllabus (as you will know) is quite different from the GCSE syllabus - you just need to have a good grasp at algebra and factorising and all that. Yout do not need to know about tessellation for example. As you're worried about doing well in maths, don't beat around the bush, just go to all lengths to do well in it - work flat out at it for two years, and just practice practice practice! I am by no means gifted at maths either, so I feel your pain, but at the end of the day it's literally just practice until perfect. Seriously. If you REALLY want to study Physics, you should feel motivated to push through the struggle of maths to reach your goal - treat it as a stepping stone.
    I hope this helps a little! Believe in yourself, this is YOUR life, you only live it once! Just go for it and don't look back.
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    (Original post by Phoebus Apollo)
    Hey,
    I'm in year 13 now and at the end of year 12 I was kind of in the same boat as you. I took biology, chemistry, maths and Latin with the intention of pursuing a degree in a medicine. however, I quickly realised it was not for me and switched to a classics degree. Luckily for me though I had taken Latin which was what I needed to apply, but I understand that for you it's a little different.

    First and foremost, you need to understand NOTHING is too late in life, believe me - when I switched degrees right at the end of year 12 I felt so lost, just like you. If I were in your position I would start 6th form again from scratch so that you do the right subjects and improve your grades to stand a better chance of getting in ( I think it would be way too stressful to resist AS exams whilst studying for A2 exams). You've already mentioned that for a physics degree they like the combination of physics, maths and further maths, but that you're not very good at maths. So you have two options: take a gamble and take physics, maths and further maths A levels even though you aren't that strong at maths. OR take physics, maths and an level in any other subject that you like (maybe even something 'recreational' like art) - you say they like further maths, but I looked at the Oxford university website criteria for physics just as an example of what a top uni wants and they were happy with just maths, physics and an a level in any other subject for a physics degree, so you DON'T have to take further maths, and I would advise you not to if you think maths is not your strong point - why make it more difficult for yourself?
    Regarding whether you should take do maths GCSE again, no I personally don't think you need to, regardless of whether you end up taking further maths or not. The stuff you learn on the AS level and A level syllabus (as you will know) is quite different from the GCSE syllabus - you just need to have a good grasp at algebra and factorising and all that. Yout do not need to know about tessellation for example. As you're worried about doing well in maths, don't beat around the bush, just go to all lengths to do well in it - work flat out at it for two years, and just practice practice practice! I am by no means gifted at maths either, so I feel your pain, but at the end of the day it's literally just practice until perfect. Seriously. If you REALLY want to study Physics, you should feel motivated to push through the struggle of maths to reach your goal - treat it as a stepping stone.
    I hope this helps a little! Believe in yourself, this is YOUR life, you only live it once! Just go for it and don't look back.
    Hello and thank you for taking the time to write a very detailed response to help out a stranger like me! I really do appreciate it.
    Yes I do agree resitting the whole 2 years seems like the best way to go as I believe that even if I do somehow get into the foundation degree and try to scramble my way through it, it will just come back to bite me when the degree actually starts. I want to make sure that there are no gaps in my knowledge and that I can solve any question that comes up.

    I think I'll finish year 13 because - well I might as well. I'll try to get As and A*s. Then I will take a gap year or 2 and do Physics and Maths A level, and pick up further maths AS if I'm feeling confident enough at the end. That way by the end I'd have 5 full A-levels and 2 AS levels (I guess the AS in Physics would be irrelevant if I just took it again to full A-level). I agree I'll try not to make it difficult for myself though.

    I will get private tuition and review my basics in Maths - some of them were kept fresh by Physics AS but it still need brushing up on. I'll revise the books, practice the exams but I won't actually retake the exam. I AM determined to reach my goal and I WILL try my very best in order to achieve the grades and be able to do Physics at University whether it takes two or ten years.

    Thank you very much for your help and sharing your personal experience with me, I do appreciate it.
 
 
 
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