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    I'm going to be studying psychology in September, I've heard so many people saying it's a bull**** course and too many people do it now to have a decent career in it, and I know a few people that do it cos they don't know what else to do, but I have a genuine passion for it! I want to be a psychologist and use the knowledge and qualifications I achieve (aiming to do a master's and PhD, afterwards) to help people with mental health issues. And to be a psychologist, you need to study psychology, so I'm stuck! So, not really a question, just interested to know people's opinions.

    Thanks
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    (Original post by Percyns)
    I'm going to be studying psychology in September, I've heard so many people saying it's a bull**** course and too many people do it now to have a decent career in it, and I know a few people that do it cos they don't know what else to do, but I have a genuine passion for it! I want to be a psychologist and use the knowledge and qualifications I achieve (aiming to do a master's and PhD, afterwards) to help people with mental health issues. And to be a psychologist, you need to study psychology, so I'm stuck! So, not really a question, just interested to know people's opinions.

    Thanks
    Any degree in Psychology whether it is straight, clinical, forensic, cognitive etc. is valuable to employers - because it gives you so many transferable skills needed e.g. statistics, handling data, analysing, evaluating, problem solving. But also gives you the ability to actually understand processes within the body and mind and why people do the things they do. It is a truly fascinating subject from my experience so far and i would completely recommend it. At this stage assuming you are talking about AS/A2 (considering you said starting september) i would ignore people's views like 'too many people do it.' because lets face it there are a lot of people doing the same subjects wanting the same job you're never going to have just 5 people in the world doing Psychology or any subject for that matter so that's a silly argument. It's all about competition when it get's to higher level which is where 'all them people' start to get lower and lower because it's a competitive subject in terms of getting into uni which puts people off. but you seem keen to do it, and given the message you have left explaining 1) you have an interest and 2) you want to be a psychologist i would think you had no reason to question doing it or listening to your friends - go for it and enjoy it!
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    (Original post by Percyns)
    I'm going to be studying psychology in September, I've heard so many people saying it's a bull**** course and too many people do it now to have a decent career in it, and I know a few people that do it cos they don't know what else to do, but I have a genuine passion for it! I want to be a psychologist and use the knowledge and qualifications I achieve (aiming to do a master's and PhD, afterwards) to help people with mental health issues. And to be a psychologist, you need to study psychology, so I'm stuck! So, not really a question, just interested to know people's opinions.

    Thanks
    Don't listen to other people's opinion. If you want to do it, then go for it. I am currently studying A2 Psychology and it is extremely fascinating.
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    Its not any better or worse than a humanties degree (e.g. english), although unlike some "harder" sciences (e.g. engineering, computer science, maths) the skills you learn are not in very high demand. On the other hands, there are lots of jobs that doing any degree will open doors for. Becoming a psychologist though is pretty rare for people with psychology degrees (due to lack of jobs / amount of psychology graduates) but definately attainable if your motivated + capable.
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    (Original post by Percyns)
    I'm going to be studying psychology in September, I've heard so many people saying it's a bull**** course and too many people do it now to have a decent career in it, and I know a few people that do it cos they don't know what else to do, but I have a genuine passion for it! I want to be a psychologist and use the knowledge and qualifications I achieve (aiming to do a master's and PhD, afterwards) to help people with mental health issues. And to be a psychologist, you need to study psychology, so I'm stuck! So, not really a question, just interested to know people's opinions.

    Thanks
    I'm Korean so I've got the same reactions as you... -_- But like you I want to be a psychologist after my degree studies so I need to do it in order to do my PhD and stuff. But if you have a genuine passion for it and have a career plan then it's fine And because Psychology itself is quite broad (i.e you're not doing like Psychology with blah blah blah) so even if you do start psychology and you feel like you might not want to continue with that career (I've heard some friends go through it - one friend was sure she wanted to do Educational but then changed to Forensic) then because it's so broad and offers a lot of transferable skills you can use it for a lot of jobs. But the most important thing is to do what YOU want to do and if Psychology is it then go do it!
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    Just to make you aware that the path to being a qualified practitioner psychologist (i.e. seeing clients) is not to do a PhD.

    Instead you do a doctoral course which has a big practical component, the most common is the Doctorate in Clinical Psychology (DClinPsy). While doctorates also exist for Health, Forensic, Occupational, Counselling, Educational and others, I'm sure.
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    (Original post by _Sinnie_)
    Just to make you aware that the path to being a qualified practitioner psychologist (i.e. seeing clients) is not to do a PhD.

    Instead you do a doctoral course which has a big practical component, the most common is the Doctorate in Clinical Psychology (DClinPsy). While doctorates also exist for Health, Forensic, Occupational, Counselling, Educational and others, I'm sure.
    hi ive got offers fromLoughborough(AAB) liverpool east anglia(both ABB) and portsmouth (BBB).I'm not sure how to pick my firm and insurance? I'm waiting on essex(ABB) to give me an offer,how should i choose interms of grades since i think il probably get ABB overall as I got ABB at AS.
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    I'm not really familiar with the ins and outs of applying any more. Generally though I think an insurance choice should be one you're pretty certain you'll get in to - grades wise.
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    It's boils down to supply and demand; a lot of graduates going for comparitively fewer positions. I believe somewhere in the region of 15-20% of psychology grads go on to professional training. Whether the competition really is that stiff or some graduates are basically lazy and expect things to be handed to them a platter isn't that clear.
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    A dear friend of mine is a psychotherapist and he does very well at it.
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    If you are passionate about Psychology and are determined to have a career in it, go for it!

    I've just graduated my Psychology degree, and I was one of those individuals who studied Psychology because I did not know what else to do.

    I'm working as a copywriter at the moment and volunteering in the NHS.I am going to start volunteering with The Samaritans in January too. I've now realised I would actually like a career in Psychology. I now look back and wish I had volunteered in the NHS whilst I was at uni- even if it was only for 4 hours a week. I know people who did that and they are support workers in mental health now. I think in another six months I will have the experience to be a support worker too and then a few months after that an assistant psychologist.

    Good luck!
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    I did a degree in Psychology and don't regret it. Succeeding as a psychologist seems to be based on your own focus and a great deal affected by 'who you know' in the right positions.
    It is a very broad subject though and after 2 years working in NHS research I am now back at uni doing Mental Health nursing.
    Good luck!!
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    I am interested in psychology, too.
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    (Original post by Maria_1993)
    If you are passionate about Psychology and are determined to have a career in it, go for it!

    I've just graduated my Psychology degree, and I was one of those individuals who studied Psychology because I did not know what else to do.

    I'm working as a copywriter at the moment and volunteering in the NHS.I am going to start volunteering with The Samaritans in January too. I've now realised I would actually like a career in Psychology. I now look back and wish I had volunteered in the NHS whilst I was at uni- even if it was only for 4 hours a week. I know people who did that and they are support workers in mental health now. I think in another six months I will have the experience to be a support worker too and then a few months after that an assistant psychologist.

    Good luck!
    whats working as a copywriter like?
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    (Original post by scrawlx101)
    whats working as a copywriter like?
    It's okay but I don't see myself making a career out of it. I do it freelance and it took ages to build business. I started in August and only now in November am I starting to make decent money (£10 per hour). I advertise myself as a copywriter but to be truthful I actually do a lot of ghostwriting. I only have enough clients to do it 15-20 hours a week but it means I can support myself through volunteer work. Unfortunately, being self- employed means I can't get a mortgage easily so I am looking for a salaried job also. Sometimes it is nice being able to wake up when I want with the luxury of working at home, but other times getting out of the house to volunteer and see friends is the only thing keeping me sane. I'd love to get a job as a salaried copywriter but I'm convinced it's tough to get a job in the UK as all my clients are either American or Australian and I haven't even been given an interview. I hope that answers your question!
 
 
 
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