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Could cheerleading help to challenge gender stereotypes? watch

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    Hi all,

    Would love to hear your thoughts on this report out today about gender stereotypes.

    Two of our academics believe that cheerleading has the potential to challenge traditional ideas about gender and to be an inclusive activity for both boys and girls.

    Here's what they had to say:

    "It seems imperative to consider how the sport can be shaped in socially progressive ways,” said Dr Pressland. “Cheerleading is very much viewed as an activity for girls, a safe activity where they can remain girls and women. We were really interested in what happens when boys and girls take part it in it together, for boys in terms of their masculinity and how the gender relationships work within the team.

    “We think this would be a fantastic, inclusive, activity for young people to work together at and a place where gender norms could be challenged and played with, particularly as sport becomes very segregated when young people get to a certain age, for example when their bodies are developing.

    “Girls tend to drop out of sport between the ages of 14 and 16, but if you normalise girls and boys taking part together then as they become aware of their bodies changing, it's not going to be as big a deal. It is also about building teamwork and having respect among players, being social rather than having this aura of sexuality between the genders.”

    Dr Pressland added: “With many sports the focus often ends up being on who is the fastest or strongest. Cheerleading is a very physical, and potentially dangerous, activity where skill is just as important as strength. We found that because of the specific safety issues, people rallied round and were very protective of each other, which you don't find in other sports.”
    What do you think?
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    Could the girls dropping out of sports be to do with them taking school much more seriously at this age? I think that might be a reason. Not really sure what you're trying to say here. The most popular (the best) sports such as football, rugby, tennis, cricket, athletics will always have to be segregated usually from the start, but definitely by puberty.
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    The crux of the matter is many schools sport is still sex-segregated, but this only fuels the notion that certain sports are off limits.The academic is talking about more mixed-sex classes to promote better gender relations. Promoting more activities where everyone works together will only help this further. So boys getting involved in activities like cheerleading, which require lots of teamwork, can have a "progressive influence on ideas about gender".
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    (Original post by University of East Anglia)
    Hi all,

    Would love to hear your thoughts on this report out today about gender stereotypes.

    Two of our academics believe that cheerleading has the potential to challenge traditional ideas about gender and to be an inclusive activity for both boys and girls.

    Here's what they had to say:



    What do you think?
    I think Dr.Pressland sounds like a complete to$$er. I mean c'mon - he's expecting lads to want to start twirling batons and tossing sparkling pom poms in the air? This guy's an academic? He actually gets paid for dreaming up this $$hit? LOL!
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    (Original post by University of East Anglia)
    Hi all,

    Would love to hear your thoughts on this report out today about gender stereotypes.

    Two of our academics believe that cheerleading has the potential to challenge traditional ideas about gender and to be an inclusive activity for both boys and girls.

    Here's what they had to say:



    What do you think?

    There's no way in Hell a boy will want to do cheerleading (unless he is effeminate). Terrible idea...
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    (Original post by The Blue Axolotl)
    There's no way in Hell a boy will want to do cheerleading (unless he is effeminate). Terrible idea...
    I don't have a son but if I did there's no way I'd let him prance around like a big fairy doing cheer-leading. I already have a daughter that can do that.
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    Funny but there appears to be no end of academics straining to piss all over boys natural choices and masculinity.😃
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    (Original post by Howard)
    I don't have a son but if I did there's no way I'd let him prance around like a big fairy doing cheer-leading. I already have a daughter that can do that.
    It's almost every dad's nightmare.

    People will say that we're not accepting our kids for who they are, but for a dad to see his son wear tutus and do pirouettes instead of playing footie and rugby isn't that great.
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    We don't need to challenge "gender" stereotypes. Most stereotypes are actually true. That's why they exist.
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    (Original post by caravaggio2)
    Funny but there appears to be no end of academics straining to piss all over boys natural choices and masculinity.😃
    School, College and University are now almost all femininely inclined. Girls and women are excelling whilst boys are falling.


    http://www.theguardian.com/education...-my-university


    You can search "Feminisation of schools" to learn more
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    Being a male cheerleader has its advantages.

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    I just got back from New Zealand where co-ed sport is much bigger than in the UK. I thought I was going to get involved in rugby but ended up playing (this is the first time I've admitted this publicly...) netball! In the UK this is traditionally seen as a 'sport for girls' but in NZ they have a much healthier approach: it's an opportunity for guys and girls to play together and generally stay fit & active. I'll be honest - I didn't enjoy the game (too stop-start for my liking) - but the social aspect was awesome and I liked the way it challenged my own and others' perceptions on gender in sport.
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    (Original post by Tim BirdTSR)
    I just got back from New Zealand where co-ed sport is much bigger than in the UK. I thought I was going to get involved in rugby but ended up playing (this is the first time I've admitted this publicly...) netball! In the UK this is traditionally seen as a 'sport for girls' but in NZ they have a much healthier approach: it's an opportunity for guys and girls to play together and generally stay fit & active. I'll be honest - I didn't enjoy the game (too stop-start for my liking) - but the social aspect was awesome and I liked the way it challenged my own and others' perceptions on ggirls and sport
    So you played netball, but did girls play rugby against guys? (Not tag )
    I can see how lads could play netball (ish) or cheerleading but I don't see how girls could play against teenage lads in most other sports full on without restrictions to handicap the lads. They'll be making soldiers walk a mile in high heels next.....Oh... hang on....they've done that.😆
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    It wouldn't work. The US have had mixed cheerleaders for ever. But then again they are allowed sombreros, unlike UEA students.

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    I'll raise my son to **** cheerleaders not wear tutus
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    It appears neither the academics nor posters above have any knowledge of cheer, else they'd know that, particularly at high levels, it already is a co-ed sport. (and certainly not full of batons or pompoms - how clueless!)
    Simply , a guy who can toss around a girl above his head with such precision is already way above the league of most other guys (especially those in this thread for instance).
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    (Original post by Tim BirdTSR)
    I just got back from New Zealand where co-ed sport is much bigger than in the UK. I thought I was going to get involved in rugby but ended up playing (this is the first time I've admitted this publicly...) netball! In the UK this is traditionally seen as a 'sport for girls' but in NZ they have a much healthier approach: it's an opportunity for guys and girls to play together and generally stay fit & active. I'll be honest - I didn't enjoy the game (too stop-start for my liking) - but the social aspect was awesome and I liked the way it challenged my own and others' perceptions on gender in sport.
    Do they play rugby/football/aussie rules together too?
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    (Original post by caravaggio2)
    So you played netball, but did girls play rugby against guys? (Not tag )
    I can see how lads could play netball (ish) or cheerleading but I don't see how girls could play against teenage lads in most other sports full on without restrictions to handicap the lads. They'll be making soldiers walk a mile in high heels next.....Oh... hang on....they've done that.😆
    It's pathetic, why play netball when you can play basketball?


    (Original post by The Blue Axolotl)
    School, College and University are now almost all femininely inclined. Girls and women are excelling whilst boys are falling.http://www.theguardian.com/education...-my-universityYou can search "Feminisation of schools" to learn more


    It's one big **** test.


    Some where there is some really wealthy powerful man who is laughing hysterically at how he's managed to convince boys that dressing up as princesses or putting on tutus and dancing around with pompoms is what it means to be a real man.
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    (Original post by Inazuma)
    It appears neither the academics nor posters above have any knowledge of cheer, else they'd know that, particularly at high levels, it already is a co-ed sport. (and certainly not full of batons or pompoms - how clueless!)
    Simply , a guy who can toss around a girl above his head with such precision is already way above the league of most other guys (especially those in this thread for instance).
    Ratio of straight males to females in cheerleading?
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    (Original post by JD1lla)
    Ratio of straight males to females in cheerleading?

    Avoided the trap nicely there I must say
 
 
 
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