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Why the uproar about scrapping of grants? watch

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    You still get the money, so you can go to university. It isn't really that unreasonable that you have to pay it back, like most people.

    That's the problem with the world today, people think they're entitled to so much more than they are.
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    Because it is completely fair to have everyone subsidise your degree, hence the protests.
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    I'm more annoyed that the loan that replaced the grant is based on household income; meaning I won't actually get enough to pay rent.
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    Denmark pays students to go to university. We are a wealthy country just like them.

    Young people, demand better from your government.

    (Original post by The Wavefunction)
    You still get the money, so you can go to university. It isn't really that unreasonable that you have to pay it back, like most people.
    It's for the same reason you don't have to pay back your usage of up-to 18 education, roads and hospitals etc. When you get a high paying job due to your education you will pay a higher rate of tax. You pay for your education that way. Why do you think it is fair that these people pay even more money back?

    I got grants and only 3k fees. I don't understand why everyone is so happy to pay even more.

    (Original post by Incongruous)
    Because it is completely fair to have everyone subsidize your degree, hence the protests.
    Just like that road the protesters are stood on.
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    (Original post by Andy98)
    I'm more annoyed that the loan that replaced the grant is based on household income; meaning I won't actually get enough to pay rent.
    Isn't that how it works now? My loan is the bare minimum. Still covers my rent though.
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    (Original post by The Wavefunction)
    Isn't that how it works now? My loan is the bare minimum. Still covers my rent though.
    I dunno, but I've figured my loan will be around 2or 3k and the rent is looking like 5k
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    Because students from poorer families would have to get a bigger loan and repay more putting them at a disadvantage. The grant system somewhat balanced that out.
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    just like the new social housing policy in London, the scrapping of grants acts like a social cleansing of stopping those kids from lower income families going into higher education for fear of not being able to pay the fees. it's disgusting how the government think they can dictate who can and who can't go to uni depending on their socio-economic background. besides why should we have to pay so much for education when education is arguably the most important thing in society??
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    (Original post by magic_is_might)
    just like the new social housing policy in London, the scrapping of grants acts like a social cleansing of stopping those kids from lower income families going into higher education for fear of not being able to pay the fees. it's disgusting how the government think they can dictate who can and who can't go to uni depending on their socio-economic background. besides why should we have to pay so much for education when education is arguably the most important thing in society??
    Yeah, but you're still getting the money. It's just you've got to pay it back, which shouldn't be effected by your socioeconomic upbringing as you've had the chance to change it by going to university.
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    (Original post by Andy98)
    I dunno, but I've figured my loan will be around 2or 3k and the rent is looking like 5k
    Not sure about those figures. 95% sure my loan is the minimum and is about £3,500 per academic year, give or take. Rent will depend on the area, but I pay £275 rent and about £40 bills, so that's mine covered. I also work part time.
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    (Original post by Tailored_Suit)
    Scandinavian countries are just the best, they do almost everything right!
    and it's not like these types of policies result in Denmark being a basket case. In 2014 Forbes ranked it the best place to do business. You can have free education and a productive capitalist based economy.
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    (Original post by ChaoticButterfly)
    and it's not like these types of policies result in Denmark being a basket case. In 2014 Forbes ranked it the best place to do business. You can have free education and a productive capitalist based economy.
    Free education sounds brilliant, getting paid even better, but I have to question whether it would work here.

    Too many people go to university for a 3 year piss up as it is, partly because we let any Tom, **** or Mohammed with 3 C's go to the various polytechnics in order to get their 2:2 in business management. Start paying people and it will get worse, placing an even greater stress on the tax payer. Maybe make it so that top students at top universities get subsidised, but for everyone, I think it would be catastrophic.
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    (Original post by misscaricature)
    Because students from poorer families would have to get a bigger loan and repay more putting them at a disadvantage. The grant system somewhat balanced that out.
    It shouldn't be based on household income because you don't have any right to what your parents earn and you are an adult by that point.

    Why should those who pay more in tax then have to pay even more to get a education for their children?

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    (Original post by DiddyDec)
    It shouldn't be based on household income because you don't have any right to what your parents earn and you are an adult by that point.

    Why should those who pay more in tax then have to pay even more to get a education for their children?

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    Because most people who earn a lot of money have used the Education system to get there and should pay back into the system what they got out of it.
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    (Original post by magic_is_might)
    just like the new social housing policy in London, the scrapping of grants acts like a social cleansing of stopping those kids from lower income families going into higher education for fear of not being able to pay the fees. it's disgusting how the government think they can dictate who can and who can't go to uni depending on their socio-economic background. besides why should we have to pay so much for education when education is arguably the most important thing in society??
    Coming from a low income family I can tell you this is bull****.

    I quite liked the grants while I was at uni. They filled up my ISA allowance each year. The student loans were enough to live off and not having the grants wouldn't have stopped me going to uni.
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    (Original post by magic_is_might)
    just like the new social housing policy in London, the scrapping of grants acts like a social cleansing of stopping those kids from lower income families going into higher education for fear of not being able to pay the fees. it's disgusting how the government think they can dictate who can and who can't go to uni depending on their socio-economic background. besides why should we have to pay so much for education when education is arguably the most important thing in society??
    No its not, because they don't have to pay the money back unless they get a decent income afterwards.

    If they stay poor they won't pay back
    If they get rich after going to university they pay back

    So people pay in accordance to their ability to pay
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    (Original post by misscaricature)
    Because students from poorer families would have to get a bigger loan and repay more putting them at a disadvantage. The grant system somewhat balanced that out.
    Not so, repayment terms are exactly the same and so would be the monthly amounts. They'd just pay it back for 30 rather than 20 years.

    As a poor person who got full loans and grants, it would not have made a blind bit of difference to me.
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    (Original post by misscaricature)
    Because students from poorer families would have to get a bigger loan and repay more putting them at a disadvantage. The grant system somewhat balanced that out.
    So being from a poor family entitles you to free money, but being from a more well-off family doesn't? Well there's equality for you:rolleyes:
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    Left wingers think they are entitled to everything, they have no economic plan or structure, just borrow, borrow and borrow to fund their selfish desires instead of doing a hard days work.

    The rabble you find in the protest like today are the failures who can't accept they have to pay back the money they failed to deliver on
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    (Original post by TheArtofProtest)
    Well, if we are going to make both students equal (financially), then yes, that is equality.
    No, it isn't. Equality is either everyone getting a grant or nobody getting one.
 
 
 
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