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    If Oxford uses tutorial system to select the best candidate (particularly engineering science), what do they base their judgement on? Intelligence? Frequencies of guidance needed? Able to talk?
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    I'm not a sciences student but generally speaking, across all subjects, they are looking in the December interviews for:

    - raw intelligence
    - raw potential
    - ability to form and sustain a line of argument (but equally for someone to be able to backtrack or hold up their hands when they realise they've got something wrong)
    - someone suited to the tutorial system (not everyone is)
    - someone who they can teach and someone who will learn (they do not want a cocky know-it-all)
    - someone who they can like/get on with/put up with for 3-4 years (or 6 if medicine)

    Some tutors like to create a year group cohort whose skills complement each other, or who will get on well. I know my tutor puts a lot of emphasis on this, though it very much depends on the individual tutors, etc.

    Hope that gives you some idea
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    these are some of the qualities tutors might be looking out for in a law interview:

    1. Academic ability and potential: This is an important one that can be reflected in sophisticated and clear arguments, strong analysis and cogent reasoning.

    2. Motivation and independent thought: The point of Oxbridge interviews in general and law interviews in particular is to see how quickly you can get to grips with new information with it and apply it to something you already know. The ability to do this well is impressive. Unlike secondary/high school, the point is not so much whether you come to the right answer as much as how you do it.

    3. Enthusiasm for your course. Your tutors will be spending 3 years with you and giving you work. They want to have rigorous debate and discussion with people who are passionate about their subject and not applicants who treat it as a chore.

    If you'd like to talk more or get in touch with successful applicants who know their tutors, to see what they look out for, drop me a message!
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    (Original post by niujinforever)
    these are some of the qualities tutors might be looking out for in a law interview:

    1. Academic ability and potential: This is an important one that can be reflected in sophisticated and clear arguments, strong analysis and cogent reasoning.

    2. Motivation and independent thought: The point of Oxbridge interviews in general and law interviews in particular is to see how quickly you can get to grips with new information with it and apply it to something you already know. The ability to do this well is impressive. Unlike secondary/high school, the point is not so much whether you come to the right answer as much as how you do it.

    3. Enthusiasm for your course. Your tutors will be spending 3 years with you and giving you work. They want to have rigorous debate and discussion with people who are passionate about their subject and not applicants who treat it as a chore.

    If you'd like to talk more or get in touch with successful applicants who know their tutors, to see what they look out for, drop me a message!
    I still haven't received offer for interview but since I have admission test already, it might be better for me to start preparing for it rather than after recieving the interview offer. I will message you once I know which college I was assigned for interview. I am trying to understand these criteria like enthusiasm, see how I can quickly assimilate new concepts....I just don't understand how it can differentiate a good candidate from not-so-good candidate. It seems to me that their selection is based on impression. Feel free to correct me if I get the wrong feeling.

    Thank you for such reply.
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    (Original post by Yong Zheng Xin)
    I still haven't received offer for interview but since I have admission test already, it might be better for me to start preparing for it rather than after recieving the interview offer. I will message you once I know which college I was assigned for interview. I am trying to understand these criteria like enthusiasm, see how I can quickly assimilate new concepts....I just don't understand how it can differentiate a good candidate from not-so-good candidate. It seems to me that their selection is based on impression. Feel free to correct me if I get the wrong feeling.

    Thank you for such reply.
    I'm going to add on to what TLG has already said said:
    1) People who don't assimilate new concepts quickly are likely to struggle in the tutorial system. Oxford terms are very short, and very intense. I would describe it as running on an intellectual treadmill for 8 weeks non-stop, with a mountain of work always looming ahead. If you can't learn at a rapid pace, you're probably going to really struggle, and people have quit because they simply couldn't cope.

    It's also important in the sense that in tutorials, tutors or even your fellow tutorial mates will offer up new ideas, or different perspectives. It's very important that students be responsive to new information and be capable of incorporating it into their thinking quickly, because otherwise you can't bounce discussions off each other effectively. Tutors also don't want to "baby" students by having to explain everything. If students can grasp concepts and ideas quickly, then the discussion can move to a deeper, more meaningful level, rather than being stuck at explanations.

    2) I would say how important enthusiasm is probably depends on subject (it doesn't factor in mine at all, as far as I know). But the point is that if you have a genuine interest in your subject, you're more likely to actually like it enough to do it intensely for 3/ 4 years. That's hugely important because at the end of the day, one simply cannot rely on inherent smarts alone to get an Oxford degree - it does require an awful lot of studying (it is far, far more difficult and time consuming than IB/ A levels/ any other equivalent exam, and personally, I don't think I realized how hard I'd have to work until I got to Oxford). If you actually like your subject (or at the very least, don't dislike it), it will make studying more bearable.
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    (Original post by Yong Zheng Xin)
    I still haven't received offer for interview but since I have admission test already, it might be better for me to start preparing for it rather than after recieving the interview offer. I will message you once I know which college I was assigned for interview. I am trying to understand these criteria like enthusiasm, see how I can quickly assimilate new concepts....I just don't understand how it can differentiate a good candidate from not-so-good candidate. It seems to me that their selection is based on impression. Feel free to correct me if I get the wrong feeling.

    Thank you for such reply.
    No problem. If you are interested in physics or engineering resources to help with your interviews (I assume you're applying for one of them), feel free to drop me a PM
 
 
 
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