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    If you had a cylinder, sealed at both ends, with the pressure rising inside, would it blow at the end, or split along the side first?
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    (Original post by haron1)
    If you had a cylinder, sealed at both ends, with the pressure rising inside, would it blow at the end, or split along the side first?
    Assuming that the cylinder is a "one piece" metal container and that the area of the side is greater than the area of both ends, then clearly it would explode from the side.
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    (Original post by Mehrdad jafari)
    Assuming that the cylinder is a "one piece" metal container and that the area of the side is greater than the area of both ends, then clearly it would explode from the side.
    why
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    (Original post by haron1)
    why
    Well, pressure= force/area
    Therefore force is proportional to area
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    (Original post by haron1)
    If you had a cylinder, sealed at both ends, with the pressure rising inside, would it blow at the end, or split along the side first?
    Too much information regarding the cylinder missed out to provide an answer, but using certain assumptions (the cylinder is thin-walled e.g. like an aerosol can, the ends are flat and of same material properties) then it would split along the side first.

    This is because, when considering cylinders, there are two tensile stresses that we take into consideration: the hoop stress (along the circumference of the cylinder) and the axial stress.

    The force causing failure = pressure x projected area

    For the hoop/circumferential stress, the force is equal pressure x diameter x length, and the area is equal to twice the thickness x the length. This resolves to pd/2t.

    For the axial stress, the force causing failure = pressure x area of circle, and the area is pi x d x t. This resolves to pd/4t.

    Therefore, the hoop/circumferential stress is twice the the axial stress, and thus the cylinder will fail along its side before the ends.
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    (Original post by Mehrdad jafari)
    Well, pressure= force/area
    Therefore force is proportional to area
    thanks
 
 
 
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