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Don't want to be a doctor but too far into degree to quit watch

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    Hey guys , I'm a 4th year medical student studying abroad and I realised last year that medicine truly isn't for me, I hate being in the hospital and find most of my subject material excruciatingly boring and just can;t imagine myself as a doctor. I have chosen not to quit because i feel like it would be such a waste of money and time but I'm having troubles motivating myself to continue studying and going to class. has anyone had any similar experiences ?. Also does anyone know about career prospects with a medical degree that don't involving having clinical experience? , ive done some research but it seems extremely limited without having at least foundation training
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    (Original post by confused1235)
    Hey guys , I'm a 4th year medical student studying abroad and I realised last year that medicine truly isn't for me, I hate being in the hospital and find most of my subject material excruciatingly boring and just can;t imagine myself as a doctor. I have chosen not to quit because i feel like it would be such a waste of money and time but I'm having troubles motivating myself to continue studying and going to class. has anyone had any similar experiences ?. Also does anyone know about career prospects with a medical degree that don't involving having clinical experience? , ive done some research but it seems extremely limited without having at least foundation training
    Tricky situation I can appreciate. In an ideal scenario you would complete your degree and then maybe apply for graduate positions e.g. Investment Banking, Management, Consultancy etc. A medical degree would be of course highly regarded but then you might be in the tricky situation as (I assume) you haven't done any internships previously? In some sense it would be silly to complete the medical degree and not do at least FY1 and get full registration because even if your long term goal is not in Medicine, at least you can "fall back on it" with full registration. I know a couple of family friends who did that and one had a very successful IB career in New York.

    The other issue you would have now is essentially quitting Medicine for another degree even if you could transfer over etc.

    I think you should talk to yourr academic tutor and perhaps careers advisor at university. You are not alone in this there are always a few students who every year get through Medicine and decide they don't want to be doctor/practice full time or do Medicine in the traditional sense etc. You aren't "locked into" a Medical Career.
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    Thanks for the reply. I agree that the logical thing to do would be FY1 but at the same when I shadowed Foundation year doctors last summer, that was the point I realised I really despised the hospital as a work environment but also realised that i was not competent enough for that kind of career, i saw first hand the expectations of the junior doctors and immediately realised there was no way i was going to be able to do what they were doing. so thats the basis of my decision to not even endure through foundation is also based on the fact that i don;t want to put people at risk.This is why I'm adamant on just finding a career not associated with clinical practice at all.

    what you said initially is the way im planning to go at the moment , just try to get a non-specific graduate jobs and see where it goes from there. I will have to find some career advice but unfortunately my uni isn;t really useful in that department for international students.

    Once again thanks for the advice
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    (Original post by confused1235)
    Thanks for the reply. I agree that the logical thing to do would be FY1 but at the same when I shadowed Foundation year doctors last summer, that was the point I realised I really despised the hospital as a work environment but also realised that i was not competent enough for that kind of career, i saw first hand the expectations of the junior doctors and immediately realised there was no way i was going to be able to do what they were doing. so thats the basis of my decision to not even endure through foundation is also based on the fact that i don;t want to put people at risk.This is why I'm adamant on just finding a career not associated with clinical practice at all.

    what you said initially is the way im planning to go at the moment , just try to get a non-specific graduate jobs and see where it goes from there. I will have to find some career advice but unfortunately my uni isn;t really useful in that department for international students.

    Once again thanks for the advice
    Not to hijack but can I ask why? thinking of applying for medicine and I also think you cant expect to be as good as a junior after all they have been learning for a few more years
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    You could go into teaching or research, you dont have to work in a hospital for the rest of your life.
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    (Original post by RiotGirll)
    Not to hijack but can I ask why? thinking of applying for medicine and I also think you cant expect to be as good as a junior after all they have been learning for a few more years

    relative to most of my other classmates i feel less competent than them, so im not just comparing myself to junior doctors, Even during our hospital rotations in uni not much is required for us but i still struggle

    For most people this isn;t an issue , no one else on my course complains about finding the practical work that difficult especially at this stage .
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    (Original post by WayneEnterprises)
    You could go into teaching or research, you dont have to work in a hospital for the rest of your life.

    true i have considered research, but some training is still kinda needed for medical research , it will be quite hard to get the funding without that kind of experience.
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    (Original post by confused1235)
    relative to most of my other classmates i feel less competent than them, so im not just comparing myself to junior doctors, Even during our hospital rotations in uni not much is required for us but i still struggle

    For most people this isn;t an issue , no one else on my course complains about finding the practical work that difficult especially at this stage .
    The only reason to feel less competent would be if you failed exams and clinical exams. Otherwise our competency wouldn't come into question.

    For careers in IB/Finance you would really need to have done an internship so you ought to look at that asap as the applications are closing soon.
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    I would advise that you go back to when you first applied to medicine. What was your motive then? How much has changed since then? Could you ever go back to how keen you were before?
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    I read the subject of your post "Don't want to be a doctor but too far into degree to quit" and didn't really understand what the problem was. I wasn't much further ahead after reading your post. Why not finish the degree and then not work as a doctor? You don't need to pigeonhole yourself into something medical ("research") either - do whatever you want to do. I don't ever recommend that applicants pursue medicine as a generic degree but, if you started out with honourable intentions, there's nothing wrong with straying now. Medicine is probably as transferable a degree as exists anywhere.

    What do you want to do?
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    (Original post by MonteCristo)
    What do you want to do?
    I think this is the key thing.

    It's such a common experience that you're having, and people realise that medicine isn't for them at all different stages of their careers. I know a girl who took a year out because she hated medicine so much and it was causing her anxiety. She's back this year intercalating in ethics and law with a plan to go into medical ethics. She doesn't plan on doing F1 either. I also know a GP trainee who just got a bit sick of it all, went back to uni for fine arts and is now a curator. And I know of at least one consultant who gave it all up to become a pig farmer.

    Medicine is a hugely transferable degree, and very highly valued. By completing a medical degree you show that you can work hard, are very intelligent, can behave responsibly and professionally, can show up 90% of the time, all of this stuff. If you put your mind to it you could move into pretty much any other field of your choice. The world is your oyster... so what do you want to do?
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    The Academic Foundation Programme might open more non-clinical doors than the regular route, you still have to meet all the clinical competencies but there will be more opportunities for research, teaching and developing leadership and management skills that will be valued outside of the medical sector. You'd get your GMC registration and would be able to locum HO/SHO jobs, you might even find a specialty that really interests you in the process.

    Also, speak to the careers service at your Deanery, they will be able to provide you with guidance and support that may help you decide what is that you really want to do. Have you had any work experience outside the hospital? In the same way prospective students can shadow or have taster sessions with doctors, it should be possible to arrange taster days in different sectors. If you like the idea of management, IT, finance or comms then there are departments for those in the hospitals you already have contacts at and it will be quite a different hospital experience to clinical services. There's no shame in making use of friends and family for experiences either, you're doing a really well respected degree and I'm sure it will open doors for you to try new things.
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    (Original post by confused1235)
    relative to most of my other classmates i feel less competent than them, so im not just comparing myself to junior doctors, Even during our hospital rotations in uni not much is required for us but i still struggle

    For most people this isn;t an issue , no one else on my course complains about finding the practical work that difficult especially at this stage .
    I think most people have a lack of confidence in their knowledge, feel a bit stupid especially sometimes. I know that I am absolutely terrified about FY and don't feel "ready" for that level of responsibility. From my friends that graduated last year I know most of them felt the same way and learnt quickly on the job. I wouldn't let this be a major factor. If people don't voice it don't think they don't understand/feel the same.
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    Thanks for the feedback everyone , some very interesting points raised

    my initial reason to apply for medicine - I liked science and was really good at it and secondly my parents really wanted me to do it. my ultimate mistake was never really gaining in depth experience of what being a doctor actually entailed and more importantly i never really sat down and considered anything else or even asked myself if it was truly what I wanted to do. As cliche as it sounds , it's important to make sure medicine is definitely for you , 6 years of your life is no joke and it was incredibly stupid of me to take it so lightly. the thing that haunts me is that I could have done a course more suited to me in a good uni in England but instead im doing a course i hate in a sub par uni, as my parents pay 9k a year out of their pocket for me.

    the issue of gaining experience in other area's, the way my uni works is that when I go home in the summer most of my time will be in the hospital , gaining some clinical experience and having a tick sheet signed off at the end. this is a compulsory part of the degree. In addition to having to some exams to finish of in august usually , its difficult to find time for much else in summer.

    the question of what I want to do is still in the air for me, its hard at the stage to go out and learn about what I would like, I spend most of my time in a country where i can barely speak the language after all.

    Once again with the competency issue , I understand alot of people feel nervous for FY , but i find myself more worried since i find i can;t even match up to the average student in my uni in terms of practical ability. this is an evaluation iv;e made after 3 years of practical classes and a year of clinicals. Thats why im 100% sure the clinical setting isn;t for me

    the aim for me is just to finis the degree atm , but one thing i didn;t account for is how much the loss of motivation is effecting me, upto 2nd year i was still in the mind frame of being a doctor but once 3rd year practical and clinical work got heavy i realised it was not for me but now the problem is trying to get my head to focus on something i know i want nothing to do with.
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    I'm sorry to hear about your struggle. It's extremely hard committing to something and putting in all the hard work that a medical degree requires when your heart just isn't in it any more. I can sympathise, but TBH I think you're in a better position than most people. You've made it to 4th year of a medical degree with all your effort and you're established in a place where you're still studying. I would encourage you to finish your degree and then start afresh by applying for jobs in any other sector you want. That's my plan anyway.

    I got kicked out of medical school in the UK this year for failing an exam and I'm currently applying to transfer to finish the degree from a university abroad. I have no idea what I'm doing and I feel extremely stupid for dedicating even more time to this when I've already wasted several years on Medicine and got nothing in return. I'm further away from finishing my degree than I was last year, and it really upsets me every time I think about how I've lost the prime years of my life to a profession I don't want to be a part of any more. I don't want to do FY and I could end up unemployed for several years, but to me that's better than being a doctor.

    But you don't need to feel incompetent like I do because you've passed everything so far. You're much closer to finishing Medicine than I am, so keep looking forward to the day when you can finally graduate. Eat well, exercise, keep up your own hobbies and interests as these will all motivate you to work hard towards your degree. The only reason I made it this far is because of my dreams and ambitions outside Medicine - I'm sure if you do the same, you'll sail through the rest of your degree. Good Luck and I hope it all goes well.
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    (Original post by Ghotay)
    I think this is the key thing.

    It's such a common experience that you're having, and people realise that medicine isn't for them at all different stages of their careers. I know a girl who took a year out because she hated medicine so much and it was causing her anxiety. She's back this year intercalating in ethics and law with a plan to go into medical ethics. She doesn't plan on doing F1 either. I also know a GP trainee who just got a bit sick of it all, went back to uni for fine arts and is now a curator. And I know of at least one consultant who gave it all up to become a pig farmer.

    Medicine is a hugely transferable degree, and very highly valued. By completing a medical degree you show that you can work hard, are very intelligent, can behave responsibly and professionally, can show up 90% of the time, all of this stuff. If you put your mind to it you could move into pretty much any other field of your choice. The world is your oyster... so what do you want to do?
    For working in any job in the UK (apart from Medicine), I get the impression that only UK medical degrees will be highly valued. I don't think a medical degree from a foreign university with a much lower reputation will be as highly valued as graduates in any other field from a UK university. I want to apply for Management Consultancy but depending on the university I end up graduating from, I have no idea if I will succeed in finding any job in the UK, let alone something well-paid. In that sense, I'm not in a good position so it's hard for me to be optimistic about my future. Yes, the degree might have lots of transferable skills (I don't think it does, others may disagree) but TBH most employers will look at the university/country's reputation before they look at the degree. It sucks but from previous experience, I know that's how difficult it will be for me to get a good job.
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    (Original post by asif007)
    For working in any job in the UK (apart from Medicine), I get the impression that only UK medical degrees will be highly valued. I don't think a medical degree from a foreign university with a much lower reputation will be as highly valued as graduates in any other field from a UK university. I want to apply for Management Consultancy but depending on the university I end up graduating from, I have no idea if I will succeed in finding any job in the UK, let alone something well-paid. In that sense, I'm not in a good position so it's hard for me to be optimistic about my future. Yes, the degree might have lots of transferable skills (I don't think it does, others may disagree) but TBH most employers will look at the university/country's reputation before they look at the degree. It sucks but from previous experience, I know that's how difficult it will be for me to get a good job.
    To some extent this is true and it "helps" studying Medicine at a target university where you can attend recruitment fairs etc. e.g. Oxbridge, Imperial, UCL.
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    (Original post by Gridiron-Gangster)
    To some extent this is true and it "helps" studying Medicine at a target university where you can attend recruitment fairs etc. e.g. Oxbridge, Imperial, UCL.
    That's why I'm faced with a dilemma after being kicked out of medical school this year. Do I finish Medicine at a foreign university with a much lower reputation or do I apply for any other course at a Russell Group university? I can't decide which option would be more likely to land me a job in Management Consultancy.

    Had I not failed one exam, I would have been studying at Imperial this year and my plan was always to attend recruitment fairs for IB and Consultancy once I got there. But these a-holes at my university took that chance away from me so I'm stuck in a bad position.
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    (Original post by asif007)
    That's why I'm faced with a dilemma after being kicked out of medical school this year. Do I finish Medicine at a foreign university with a much lower reputation or do I apply for any other course at a Russell Group university? I can't decide which option would be more likely to land me a job in Management Consultancy.

    Had I not failed one exam, I would have been studying at Imperial this year and my plan was always to attend recruitment fairs for IB and Consultancy once I got there. But these a-holes at my university took that chance away from me so I'm stuck in a bad position.
    Well unless there were mitigating circumstances no UK medical school is probably going to consider you for re-entry be it at the undergrad or graduate-entry level. Depending on how far into your degree you were/are you might be better placed completing your degree abroad and then completing your FY1/FY2. After that you could then perhaps try doing a Master's degree at a good university and at that point seek to go into IB etc. That way you have the safety net of a medical career but also the means to enter IB.

    If you want to talk about this more then PM me.
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    (Original post by Gridiron-Gangster)
    Well unless there were mitigating circumstances no UK medical school is probably going to consider you for re-entry be it at the undergrad or graduate-entry level. Depending on how far into your degree you were/are you might be better placed completing your degree abroad and then completing your FY1/FY2. After that you could then perhaps try doing a Master's degree at a good university and at that point seek to go into IB etc. That way you have the safety net of a medical career but also the means to enter IB.

    If you want to talk about this more then PM me.
    TBH I don't think you've really understood what I was asking. The decision is whether to finish Medicine from somewhere abroad and end up with a rubbish degree or move onto a different course and start from scratch in the UK. I've already looked at other UK medical schools and I know that none of them will accept me, that goes without saying. Either I go to Eastern Europe to finish Medicine which could take another 4 years, or I apply for a Maths/science degree in the UK. I only want one degree and I'm not doing any more courses after that - I'm fed up of studying for no reward so I will absolutely never ever do a Masters. My question is which degree do you think would be more likely to get me a job in Consultancy? Medicine or Maths/science?
 
 
 
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