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    You guys are my last hope! This homework is due tomorrow but I don't understand a few of the questions and I can't find any help elsewhere online!

    Read the following passage.
    The 400 000 hectares of bleak open moorland in the far north of Scotland constitute one of the finest ‘blanket bogs’ in the world. Although it supports relatively few species, this outstanding ecosystem is a wonderful reservoir of wildlife more usually associated with the Arctic tundra. In the fragile peat grow highly specialised plants that are adapted to 5 survive in the cold, wet, acidic conditions. Over 30 species of sphagnum moss live there, each occupying its own niche within the bog. Other characteristic plants are the sundews, which are insectivorous. They overcome the shortage of nutrients such as nitrates by digesting small insects that are trapped by long sticky hairs on the leaves. The bog is also an important breeding ground for several species of birds, which make use of the vast 10 numbers of insects and other invertebrates that proliferate in early summer. For instance, about 70% of Britain’s population of greenshanks breed here, before migrating to the coasts further south for the winter. However, this fragile ecosystem is threatened by extensive afforestation with conifers. Patches of forest already dot the landscape. Drainage work for each patch affects a much 15 wider area than is to be planted, by lowering the water table and thus altering the habitat for the mosses. Predators such as foxes live in the forest, and few birds nest within a kilometre of a forest patch. Patches of forest are, therefore, much more damaging than they might seem. The rate of growth of trees in this harsh habitat is slow, with many casualties due to fierce gales. Without the tax incentives made available by the 20 government, afforestation in this area might well not be economic.

    QUESTIONS:

    Evaluate he case for growing trees in this habitat (4 Marks)The conifers used in plantations are the result of a long period of selection for desirable characteristics.

    Explain how a programme of selection might affect the variety of a alleles in a population. (4 Marks)
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    (Original post by WannaBMedStudent)
    You guys are my last hope! This homework is due tomorrow but I don't understand a few of the questions and I can't find any help elsewhere online!

    Read the following passage.
    The 400 000 hectares of bleak open moorland in the far north of Scotland constitute one of the finest ‘blanket bogs’ in the world. Although it supports relatively few species, this outstanding ecosystem is a wonderful reservoir of wildlife more usually associated with the Arctic tundra. In the fragile peat grow highly specialised plants that are adapted to 5 survive in the cold, wet, acidic conditions. Over 30 species of sphagnum moss live there, each occupying its own niche within the bog. Other characteristic plants are the sundews, which are insectivorous. They overcome the shortage of nutrients such as nitrates by digesting small insects that are trapped by long sticky hairs on the leaves. The bog is also an important breeding ground for several species of birds, which make use of the vast 10 numbers of insects and other invertebrates that proliferate in early summer. For instance, about 70% of Britain’s population of greenshanks breed here, before migrating to the coasts further south for the winter. However, this fragile ecosystem is threatened by extensive afforestation with conifers. Patches of forest already dot the landscape. Drainage work for each patch affects a much 15 wider area than is to be planted, by lowering the water table and thus altering the habitat for the mosses. Predators such as foxes live in the forest, and few birds nest within a kilometre of a forest patch. Patches of forest are, therefore, much more damaging than they might seem. The rate of growth of trees in this harsh habitat is slow, with many casualties due to fierce gales. Without the tax incentives made available by the 20 government, afforestation in this area might well not be economic.

    QUESTIONS:

    Evaluate he case for growing trees in this habitat (4 Marks)The conifers used in plantations are the result of a long period of selection for desirable characteristics.

    Explain how a programme of selection might affect the variety of a alleles in a population. (4 Marks)
    Ok so you've given us your homework assignment and told us that you don't understand the questions. What exactly don't you understand about this? We aren't here to do your homework for you.
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    (Original post by Eloades11)
    Ok so you've given us your homework assignment and told us that you don't understand the questions. What exactly don't you understand about this? We aren't here to do your homework for you.
    Lol - In the first question do they mean pick out the advantages and disadvantages of growing trees- i.e. if the trees grow species diversity will increase but it will mean more predators for other species? Should I mention succession?
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    (Original post by Eloades11)
    Ok so you've given us your homework assignment and told us that you don't understand the questions. What exactly don't you understand about this? We aren't here to do your homework for you.


    And with the second one idk why it's out of 4 marks?! The only 2 points I've written down is that selective breeding causes only a small pool of genes/alleles to be passed on thus a lower species diversity- where would the other 2 marks come from?
 
 
 
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