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Leak, how much for repair watch

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    Hi,

    So there is a leak near the back wheel of my car, and the exclamation dashboard signal keeps coming on so I am going to take my car down to my local garage to get it checked and fixed.

    My qs is how much should it cost to fix a leak? A range, so that i know if I am being robbed.

    TY

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    a leak of what!
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    I didnt know what the leak was, i just saw a small puddle.

    But it turns out there was no leak, maybe it was just water.

    Anyhow. He changed my brake fluid as that was low and was causing the red signal on the dashboard. It cost me 30 after i asked for discount.

    I guess my next question is, do/should people know how to change brake fluid? Is t one of those things that you should learn or leave to the professionals?

    Just so next time i know whether to do it myself or take it in. I did a bit of research and it seemed quite technical, brake fluid shouldnt be exposed to oxygen for too long, not to get it on painted surfaces, flushing the system etc.

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    I'd be concerned about where the brake fluid went, it should be a closed system! Changing the fluid is probably not a job to worry about doing yourself unless you're really keen on car maintenance though. You need to bleed the brakes afterwards and if you don't do that correctly the brakes don't work properly.
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    I would not drive. I would check fluids, leave it to sit on dry ground and then return.
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    Eh brake fluid can be a pain in the arse. Its easy to contaminate it whilst changing (moisture in the air can mess with the fluid). Also setting your brakes up for a bleed can be a pain without basic mechanical knowledge and a vehicle lift.

    Also brake fluid is a horrible substance in general to work with, causing pretty nasty skin reactions.

    If you want to try some vehicle maintenance I would recommend changing oil, its far simpler and needs done far more often so its a good thing to learn to DIY. Brake pads are another easy and somewhat frequent one.
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    (Original post by CAElite)
    Eh brake fluid can be a pain in the arse. Its easy to contaminate it whilst changing (moisture in the air can mess with the fluid). Also setting your brakes up for a bleed can be a pain without basic mechanical knowledge and a vehicle lift.

    Also brake fluid is a horrible substance in general to work with, causing pretty nasty skin reactions.

    If you want to try some vehicle maintenance I would recommend changing oil, its far simpler and needs done far more often so its a good thing to learn to DIY. Brake pads are another easy and somewhat frequent one.
    Eh, a basic brake bleed isn't too hard - if you can change your engine oil or your brake pads/discs then a brake bleed isn't much of a step up really. You either need a helper or a power bleeder. It takes a while but you can do it on your driveway either on ramps or taking a wheel off at a time. I've done it with wheels on, on the ground but it is harder to do it that way
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    (Original post by CurlyBen)
    I'd be concerned about where the brake fluid went, it should be a closed system! Changing the fluid is probably not a job to worry about doing yourself unless you're really keen on car maintenance though. You need to bleed the brakes afterwards and if you don't do that correctly the brakes don't work properly.
    That is actually what i asked him. I asked him whether brake fluid should deplete over the course of time and he said yes, and I asked where does the brake fluid go. His english wasnt very good, but i think he said that it gets burned. I didnt push.

    Should brake fluid deplete or no?

    He jacked up the car and i went underneath and he showed me that there were no leaks and I guess I was convinced, even though i didnt know what i was lookingat, it seemed dry so xD

    I will continue to check for leaks, when it stops raining!

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    (Original post by 2710)
    That is actually what i asked him. I asked him whether brake fluid should deplete over the course of time and he said yes, and I asked where does the brake fluid go. His english wasnt very good, but i think he said that it gets burned. I didnt push.

    Should brake fluid deplete or no?

    He jacked up the car and i went underneath and he showed me that there were no leaks and I guess I was convinced, even though i didnt know what i was lookingat, it seemed dry so xD

    I will continue to check for leaks, when it stops raining!

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    The level in the reservoir may decrease a little due to brake pad wear (hence the pistons remaining more extended) but not enough to cause the level to drop below the minimum. It certainly doesn't get burned. You shouldn't be seeing a regular drop in the fluid level, so for the time being monitoring the level is probably your best bet.
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    (Original post by CurlyBen)
    The level in the reservoir may decrease a little due to brake pad wear (hence the pistons remaining more extended) but not enough to cause the level to drop below the minimum. It certainly doesn't get burned. You shouldn't be seeing a regular drop in the fluid level, so for the time being monitoring the level is probably your best bet.
    Okay. I do drive a lot though. I have had my car for 2.5 years and it is nearly at 30,000 miles. I guess it was about time for the brake fluid upgrade :P

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    (Original post by 2710)
    Okay. I do drive a lot though. I have had my car for 2.5 years and it is nearly at 30,000 miles. I guess it was about time for the brake fluid upgrade :P

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    Keep a check on that, check it tomorrow, if it's wet tonight put some cardboard underneath it .


    source:

    I'm a BMW apprentice mechanic, specializing in Engine repairs, Gearbox and clutch replacement and all other maintenance and repairs
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    (Original post by 2710)
    Okay. I do drive a lot though. I have had my car for 2.5 years and it is nearly at 30,000 miles. I guess it was about time for the brake fluid upgrade :P

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Distance travelled isn't relevant to changing the brake fluid, it should be a sealed system so there should be no fluid loss. The standard recommendation is to change fluid every two years, as it absorbs water which then lowers the fluid's boiling point.
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    (Original post by 2710)
    I didnt know what the leak was, i just saw a small puddle.

    But it turns out there was no leak, maybe it was just water.

    Anyhow. He changed my brake fluid as that was low and was causing the red signal on the dashboard. It cost me 30 after i asked for discount.

    I guess my next question is, do/should people know how to change brake fluid? Is t one of those things that you should learn or leave to the professionals?

    Just so next time i know whether to do it myself or take it in. I did a bit of research and it seemed quite technical, brake fluid shouldnt be exposed to oxygen for too long, not to get it on painted surfaces, flushing the system etc.

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    I doubt he 'changed' the brake fluid. Just topped it up. I can't think of a situation where you'd carnage the brake fluid, and decor let not for £30 as draining, refilling, and bleeding a brake system is a ***** to do.

    Topping up brake fluid is as simple as unscrewing a plastic cap and refilling to the clearly marked level. It's on the same level as filling a pot noodle to the right level.
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    (Original post by CurlyBen)
    Distance travelled isn't relevant to changing the brake fluid, it should be a sealed system so there should be no fluid loss. The standard recommendation is to change fluid every two years, as it absorbs water which then lowers the fluid's boiling point.
    Two years? Seriously? I've never changed it.
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    (Original post by MatureStudent36)
    Two years? Seriously? I've never changed it.
    I know people who never change their oil. Doesn't mean it's a good idea...
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    (Original post by CurlyBen)
    I know people who never change their oil. Doesn't mean it's a good idea...
    Oil I get. But brake fluid?

    Every day's a school day.
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    (Original post by MatureStudent36)
    Oil I get. But brake fluid?

    Every day's a school day.
    Brake fluid is hygroscopic, which means it absorbs water. That reduces the boiling point of the fluid. That's a problem because whilst liquids are virtually incompressible, gases are very compressible and so they don't transmit force the way liquids do. For most driving it's unlikely to be a real problem (and I'm not religious about changing fluid at exactly two years) but if you do boil the fluid you lose virtually all braking force. The other consideration is that the additive pack in the fluid breaks down over time so the rate of corrosion accelerates if you don't change the fluid.
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    (Original post by CurlyBen)
    Brake fluid is hygroscopic, which means it absorbs water. That reduces the boiling point of the fluid. That's a problem because whilst liquids are virtually incompressible, gases are very compressible and so they don't transmit force the way liquids do. For most driving it's unlikely to be a real problem (and I'm not religious about changing fluid at exactly two years) but if you do boil the fluid you lose virtually all braking force. The other consideration is that the additive pack in the fluid breaks down over time so the rate of corrosion accelerates if you don't change the fluid.
    Informative.

    MAny thanks.
 
 
 
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