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    what does everyone think about the new grading system for GCSE's i have already done mine last year but was wondering what people think about them
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    They should have just kept the grading system the same.
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    (Original post by Blackstarr)
    They should have just kept the grading system the same.
    thats what i think they need to stop changing the GCSE's its annoying now
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    (Original post by candycaneland500)
    thats what i think they need to stop changing the GCSE's its annoying now
    Exactly this.
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    (Original post by candycaneland500)
    what does everyone think about the new grading system for GCSE's i have already done mine last year but was wondering what people think about them
    (Original post by Blackstarr)
    They should have just kept the grading system the same.
    Honestly I think it's great.

    It provides greater differentiation between different B grade candidates and different A* grade candidates. It's unfair for someone to be at the ability of really close to an A to be graded the same as someone who was really close to a C. It's good for the A* grade also as many people tend to scrape A*s and getting the ultimate grade 9 shows that they are really, really good in that subject.
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    (Original post by jamestg)
    Honestly I think it's great.

    It provides greater differentiation between different B grade candidates and different A* grade candidates. It's unfair for someone to be at the ability of really close to an A to be graded the same as someone who was really close to a C. It's good for the A* grade also as many people tend to scrape A*s and getting the ultimate grade 9 shows that they are really, really good in that subject.
    yeah i see that as well but its annoying for students when they keep on changing the GCSE's every year
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    (Original post by jamestg)
    Honestly I think it's great.

    It provides greater differentiation between different B grade candidates and different A* grade candidates. It's unfair for someone to be at the ability of really close to an A to be graded the same as someone who was really close to a C. It's good for the A* grade also as many people tend to scrape A*s and getting the ultimate grade 9 shows that they are really, really good in that subject.
    That argument could be carried on indefinitely. You could argue that it's unfair that somebody who's really close to the lower 8/9 boundary to be graded the same as somebody who got full marks, and then offer the same criticism for those changes, and then again, and again, ad infinitum.

    I've finished my A Levels now so I'm a few years removed from all this but I think it's a fairly unnecessary change. The old system worked fine and I personally think that we need to move away from this idea of continual change for its own sake -- if it ain't broken, don't fix it. At least the GCSEs are lucky enough to have been spared the horrendous 'reforms' to the A Levels. :facepalm:
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    (Original post by jamestg)
    Honestly I think it's great.

    It provides greater differentiation between different B grade candidates and different A* grade candidates. It's unfair for someone to be at the ability of really close to an A to be graded the same as someone who was really close to a C. It's good for the A* grade also as many people tend to scrape A*s and getting the ultimate grade 9 shows that they are really, really good in that subject.
    If you say so.

    I am just happy I have passed my GCSEs especially maths and that these changes don't affect me.
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    (Original post by candycaneland500)
    thats what i think they need to stop changing the GCSE's its annoying now
    The changes for GCSEs were extremely important. Coursework is bad, they waste teaching time and many schools essentially cheat so people get A*s in their coursework. You see people on here when they post results sheets where they get A*s and As in the coursework yet in the exams they get Cs and Ds - I highly doubt they actually achieved that coursework grade.

    Looking back on it - doing GCSEs in a linear format is a better way to examine GCSEs. It enables teachers to really take their time teaching, and not coach/revise for exams in Y10. It also means everyone can develop to their full potential, forcing someone to do core science in Y10 can be damaging if the student isn't confident of achieving a good grade.

    Maths needed to be made harder, the gap between GCSE and A-level for most people is too big and there needs to be better transfer to A-level. English Language needed to be reformed to provide an accurate view on someone's literacy views - the AQA qualification in particular doesn't. Science and the remaining subjects also needed to be made harder, again to improve the transition to A-level.

    GCSEs are also the first qualifications that people take, and so IMO people shouldn't be able to take 'Mickey mouse' subjects. It's the only chance people have to gain a solid foundation of qualifications for a wide range of choices post-16.
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    (Original post by Hydeman)
    That argument could be carried on indefinitely. You could argue that it's unfair that somebody who's really close to the lower 8/9 boundary to be graded the same as somebody who got full marks, and then offer the same criticism for those changes, and then again, and again, ad infinitum.

    I've finished my A Levels now so I'm a few years removed from all this but I think it's a fairly unnecessary change. The old system worked fine and I personally think that we need to move away from this idea of continual change for its own sake -- if it ain't broken, don't fix it. At least the GCSEs are lucky enough to have been spared the horrendous 'reforms' to the A Levels. :facepalm:
    Honestly I think that it should be points based, and the number of UMS you have achieved should be the grade.

    The reforms to A-levels have been awful. We have three exams for the full A-level biology. One exam on the AS content (350 page textbook) and one exam on the A2 content (350 page textbook). So far so good. But the final exam is on everything, from both years - ALL 700 PAGES. I'm content with the withdrawal of coursework, but examining both years' content in a single 2 hour exam is ludicrous.
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    (Original post by candycaneland500)
    yeah i see that as well but its annoying for students when they keep on changing the GCSE's every year
    Luckily there will no longer be changes to GCSEs anymore until they need to update the specifications.

    The class of 2015 (my year ) and class of 2014, were hit the most with the constant changing to GCSEs. We had subjects we were doing that had specifications changed as we go along with the course, having coursework withdrawn and then added back. Having questions changed to a different format. Having early entries scrapped. The list goes on.

    But as I said, luckily the changes have died down now. Good luck with yours!
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    (Original post by jamestg)
    Honestly I think that it should be points based, and the number of UMS you have achieved should be the grade.
    Agreed.

    The reforms to A-levels have been awful. We have three exams for the full A-level biology. One exam on the AS content (350 page textbook) and one exam on the A2 content (350 page textbook). So far so good. But the final exam is on everything, from both years - ALL 700 PAGES. I'm content with the withdrawal of coursework, but examining both years' content in a single 2 hour exam is ludicrous.
    I'm not sure I'd say removing the practical component from a science subject was the best move they could've made. And while what you say about 700 pages being examined is worrying, there is a case to be made that modular exams had resulted in compartmentalised knowledge that people would forget more easily and not be able to use with other knowledge.

    What I don't like is the almost total abolition of resit examinations -- otherwise, I largely approve of removing modules from the sciences, but I doubt they've done it properly. My position on exams is that they should be much, much harder in terms of content but have very liberal time constraints. I don't like the idea of exams that are difficult because of time pressure rather than content. People who aren't very good at exam technique are probably going to suffer as a result, especially since resits are increasingly not an option (only one resit allowed, as far as I know -- correct me if I'm wrong).
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    (Original post by jamestg)
    Luckily there will no longer be changes to GCSEs anymore until they need to update the specifications.

    The class of 2015 (my year ) and class of 2014, were hit the most with the constant changing to GCSEs. We had subjects we were doing that had specifications changed as we go along with the course, having coursework withdrawn and then added back. Having questions changed to a different format. Having early entries scrapped. The list goes on.

    But as I said, luckily the changes have died down now. Good luck with yours!
    Guess who escaped all that by the skin of their teeth as part of the class of 2013.
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    (Original post by Hydeman)
    I'm not sure I'd say removing the practical component from a science subject was the best move they could've made. And while what you say about 700 pages being examined is worrying, there is a case to be made that modular exams had resulted in compartmentalised knowledge that people would forget more easily and not be able to use with other knowledge.

    What I don't like is the almost total abolition of resit examinations -- otherwise, I largely approve of removing modules from the sciences, but I doubt they've done it properly. My position on exams is that they should be much, much harder in terms of content but have very liberal time constraints. I don't like the idea of exams that are difficult because of time pressure rather than content. People who aren't very good at exam technique are probably going to suffer as a result, especially since resits are increasingly not an option (only one resit allowed, as far as I know -- correct me if I'm wrong).
    I'm for the removal of the practical component, because I feel that the required practicals system now in place is much better. There is no stress of an ISA/EMPA and the teachers can get on with what they're wanting to do, which is to teach!

    I really think modular A-levels are the way to go. University is modular and A-levels should provide the best preparation for courses. But I do take into account your point, and it gives a strong argument for linear A-levels.

    I think you can have as many resits as you like, but I totally agree with you about the removal of resits in January. That was a huge mistake!
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    (Original post by jamestg)
    I'm for the removal of the practical component, because I feel that the required practicals system now in place is much better. There is no stress of an ISA/EMPA and the teachers can get on with what they're wanting to do, which is to teach!
    I have no idea what an ISA/EMPA is. But yeah, we'll have to agree to disagree on this point.

    I really think modular A-levels are the way to go. University is modular and A-levels should provide the best preparation for courses. But I do take into account your point, and it gives a strong argument for linear A-levels.
    But you could say that even university courses shouldn't be modular. I don't feel as strongly about modules in humanities and arts subjects (largely because I know almost nothing about them post-GCSE) but for science at least, it's important to have a strong grasp across a wide range of disciplines. Most science courses in the UK are too specialised anyway -- you take biology, or chemistry, or physics, or biochemistry and so on. I don't see why we should specialise even further given that real world problems, which are the forte of science, are not modular and will require you to know everything rather than a lot about one area and very little about others.

    You could insert a car transmission analogy here: just as being able to drive a manual means you can drive an automatic pretty much without any further training, being able to do linear A Levels means that, should your university course be modular (and there are some which aren't), you'd actually be at an advantage because you'll be used to the more difficult linear qualifications.

    I think you can have as many resits as you like, but I totally agree with you about the removal of resits in January. That was a huge mistake!
    Our year was the first to be affected by those. I realise the problem that they had with some schools treating January exams as a practice test before the real thing in the summer but abolishing it altogether has meant that the cost of messing up, even for reasons outside your control, is now very high.

    There's also a point to be made that applicants pre-2014 had a much easier time of it when applying to competitive universities/courses, including courses at Oxbridge, whose admissions tutors frown on people taking exams outside a standard two-year period without extenuating circumstances. Before the abolition of resits, you could have as many as four attempts at some examinations and still not exceed the two-year limit (January of year 12, June of year 12, January of year 13, June of year 13).

    When it came to my year, you were pretty much screwed if you messed up year 12 badly because you'd have to juggle resits with A2 exams, which often meant spreading yourself quite thinly. And the latest cohort are even more screwed because they have absolutely no opportunity to resit without violating the two-year limit, which I suppose is the strongest case against the new linear A Levels.
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    Makes me worry more that if I only get an 8 for example that I will be at a disadvantage to those who got a 9 (and deserved it) and will set me back. I guess I'm lucky in the sense that our year only has three GCSE's with the 9-1 system.
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    (Original post by candycaneland500)
    yeah i see that as well but its annoying for students when they keep on changing the GCSE's every year
    The last change to GCSE grades was in 1994.
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    (Original post by Josh Lyman)
    Makes me worry more that if I only get an 8 for example that I will be at a disadvantage to those who got a 9 (and deserved it) and will set me back. I guess I'm lucky in the sense that our year only has three GCSE's with the 9-1 system.
    No-one (other than you) will care whether you get an 8 or a 9. It simply isn't that important.
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    (Original post by Mr M)
    No-one (other than you) will care whether you get an 8 or a 9. It simply isn't that important.
    The sixth form I hope to go to will when many other candidates have 9's and I only got an 8.
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    (Original post by Hydeman)
    That argument could be carried on indefinitely. You could argue that it's unfair that somebody who's really close to the lower 8/9 boundary to be graded the same as somebody who got full marks, and then offer the same criticism for those changes, and then again, and again, ad infinitum.

    I've finished my A Levels now so I'm a few years removed from all this but I think it's a fairly unnecessary change. The old system worked fine and I personally think that we need to move away from this idea of continual change for its own sake -- if it ain't broken, don't fix it. At least the GCSEs are lucky enough to have been spared the horrendous 'reforms' to the A Levels. :facepalm:
    This!!!!!
 
 
 
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