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    Would you say the teaching is good?
    Did you reach the level of Japanese you wanted/expected?
    How intensive is the course?
    Can you stay with a host family in Japan?
    Does anyone know how Bham comapres to say Leeds/Soas in Japanes
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    Hi! I see that you haven't had any replies to this, apologies for reviving a four-week old thread! I'm a first year studying Japanese as a minor with French.

    - The teaching is brilliant! The teaching is all done by natives who are experts in the field of Japanese teaching (they have written popular books on Japanese for beginners). They are very passionate and engaging, and all areas of listening, speaking, writing and reading are well covered. All grammar points are covered in an understandable way and introduced in a logical order. Class sizes are small (maximum 16), which is useful for getting to know and get help from both your lecturers and fellow classmates. However, you have to be very well motivated as you need to go over everything yourself to be able to keep up, since things move on quickly.

    - Unfortunately, I'm only a 1st year so I wouldn't know! However, the second and final years do seem quite capable. As far as my own expectations are concerned, I'd say that my Japanese is, at this stage, better than I thought it would be, considering this is a beginners course. An awful lot of ground is covered very quickly indeed.

    - The course is very intensive! Since the course is intended for complete beginners, hiragana is covered in the first two weeks, then katakana in one week, and from there on one hour every week is dedicated to teaching 20 kanji. At this stage (one week left of the first semester), we've learned 100 kanji. We've also covered up to Lesson 11 in minna no nihongo, alongside extra grammar points which aren't covered in there but are important to know. There is also a strong cultural side to the course, with the lecturers giving anecdotes alongside what they teach to reinforce the learning as well as help you to understand Japanese culture from a native perspective.

    - Honestly, I have no idea about the last two! I presume that if you make the arrangements yourself then it can be done, though its probably just easier to go through university accommodation. I also have had no experience with Leeds or SOAS, apologies.

    Hope this helps
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    Thank you so much . Im glad that you have so many postive things to say as I think Birmingham is where i'm going.
    Sorry to be annoying but I have a couple more questions

    When you learn a kanji are you expected to learn it's kunyomi and onyomi reading there and then?
    Also is there a general list of kanji taught in the first year atm Im focusing on learing the jlpt 5 kanji, is this a good idea?

    What kind of grammatical stuctures are covered the first year?
    Also do you know up to what tenses are covered in the first year?
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    Oh good! I'm glad that you're looking to go to Birmingham, it is a very good uni.
    No worries, ask as many questions as you like

    Not so much there and then, but it's a good idea to keep revising them so you can read them in any many contexts as you can. There's only one hour of kanji teaching a week, so you'd have to self study to really take in what they teach. Figure out what works for you! I know it works for a lot of people to learn the on and kunyomi from existing kanji combinations (i.e: 日 (ひ) 日曜日 (にちようび)), and for some people it's just easier to just take things one kanji and it's readings at a time. You aren't expected to learn it all there and then though, lecturers are very understanding that it's a process

    We study kanji from Basic Kanji Book Vol.1, but the kanji list for N5 looks quite similar - we've already covered the majority of those kanji in this first half of the semester so you'd have a very good footing if you chose to start with those!


    Most basic grammatical structures are covered, I suppose, like use of particles, the polite form of verbs (ます, ました, etc.), how to use some verbs, how to use adjectives, counters... The first few weeks cover stuff like how to introduce yourself, how to ask for and tell the time, how to ask about things, that kind of thing to help you get your bearings.
    As for tenses, I'm not sure I know enough about them but so far like I've said we've done the polite form and sensei has mentioned doing the -て form after Christmas, although I'm not entirely sure what that is, haha.

    Sorry, I don't have that much information being only a first year myself, but I hope that that goes some way to helping and I'm here if you need anything else.
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    Bakayaro nippon

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    (Original post by taikibansei)
    Oh good! I'm glad that you're looking to go to Birmingham, it is a very good uni.
    No worries, ask as many questions as you like

    Not so much there and then, but it's a good idea to keep revising them so you can read them in any many contexts as you can. There's only one hour of kanji teaching a week, so you'd have to self study to really take in what they teach. Figure out what works for you! I know it works for a lot of people to learn the on and kunyomi from existing kanji combinations (i.e: 日 (ひ) 日曜日 (にちようび)), and for some people it's just easier to just take things one kanji and it's readings at a time. You aren't expected to learn it all there and then though, lecturers are very understanding that it's a process

    We study kanji from Basic Kanji Book Vol.1, but the kanji list for N5 looks quite similar - we've already covered the majority of those kanji in this first half of the semester so you'd have a very good footing if you chose to start with those!


    Most basic grammatical structures are covered, I suppose, like use of particles, the polite form of verbs (ます, ました, etc.), how to use some verbs, how to use adjectives, counters... The first few weeks cover stuff like how to introduce yourself, how to ask for and tell the time, how to ask about things, that kind of thing to help you get your bearings.
    As for tenses, I'm not sure I know enough about them but so far like I've said we've done the polite form and sensei has mentioned doing the -て form after Christmas, although I'm not entirely sure what that is, haha.

    Sorry, I don't have that much information being only a first year myself, but I hope that that goes some way to helping and I'm here if you need anything else.
    Thanks I will try to learn kanji from both Basic Kanji Book Vol.1 and N5 list and maybe work though the minna no nihongo book but its quite independent study unfriendly.
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    (Original post by Summer solace)
    Thanks I will try to learn kanji from both Basic Kanji Book Vol.1 and N5 list and maybe work though the minna no nihongo book but its quite independent study unfriendly.
    Yeah, they're not very good textbooks for working from by yourself but they complement the classes very well

    Good luck!
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    (Original post by taikibansei)
    Yeah, they're not very good textbooks for working from by yourself but they complement the classes very well

    Good luck!
    Thanks
 
 
 
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