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will my GP prescribe me antidepressants if I asked? watch

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    Hi. So I've been depressed on and off (more on) since I was about 14. It got really severe when I was 16. I went to counselling for the first time and cancelled a few sessions in because i was so uncomfortable with it. A few months later I tried it again and it still wasn't right for me. Fast forward to today, I've been better but I can feel myself slipping into deep depression again.
    I want to go to my GP to try get on medication but I'm not sure if he will prescribe me them? I'm 18 and honestly talking therapies don't work for me so I want to give antidepressants a go.
    Will it be likely that I'll get the prescription? Im in the last year of sixth form and do not want my depression to interfere with my exams again.
    Any information would be helpful, thank you.
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    Hi. So I've been depressed on and off (more on) since I was about 14. It got really severe when I was 16. I went to counselling for the first time and cancelled a few sessions in because i was so uncomfortable with it. A few months later I tried it again and it still wasn't right for me. Fast forward to today, I've been better but I can feel myself slipping into deep depression again.
    I want to go to my GP to try get on medication but I'm not sure if he will prescribe me them? I'm 18 and honestly talking therapies don't work for me so I want to give antidepressants a go.
    Will it be likely that I'll get the prescription? Im in the last year of sixth form and do not want my depression to interfere with my exams again.
    Any information would be helpful, thank you.
    I'm not sure about asking for them specifically, but your GP should definitely be able to help with your depression in general and I don't see why they wouldn't prescribe you antidepressants. See what they say, but if they suggest therapy etc explain how you found talking to people before and that you feel medication could be the best thing. Some might be reluctant because you're young but it's worth a try- I'd definitely advise seeing your GP anyway particularly if you've had depression badly before as you obviously don't want things to get like that again.
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    Not sure if this is of any help but I went to my GP when I was 18 after a relapse of depression and they did prescribe me with antidepressants!
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    Hi. So I've been depressed on and off (more on) since I was about 14. It got really severe when I was 16. I went to counselling for the first time and cancelled a few sessions in because i was so uncomfortable with it. A few months later I tried it again and it still wasn't right for me. Fast forward to today, I've been better but I can feel myself slipping into deep depression again.
    I want to go to my GP to try get on medication but I'm not sure if he will prescribe me them? I'm 18 and honestly talking therapies don't work for me so I want to give antidepressants a go.
    Will it be likely that I'll get the prescription? Im in the last year of sixth form and do not want my depression to interfere with my exams again.
    Any information would be helpful, thank you.
    If you are 18 and you ask then yes they probably will give you anti depressants. They will probably try and also refer you into some sort of counselling services but if they don't work then you need to talk that through with your GP. Anti depressants won't cure your depression - especially if it is severe. You need to address the underlying cause of it as tablets are just a plaster.
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    May be worth a go. But remember that they are extremely potent drugs and have rather big side effects.
    If there are psychological underlying causes then I would suggest you reconsider the counselling if you can... never good taking drugs to suppress symptoms and ignoring the cause.
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    I've never had any trouble getting a prescription for them (I was 19 when I first went on them) and neither has anyone else I know who has gone to their GP about depression. Counseling didn't work for me either but I found CBT useful; maybe you could ask your GP if it'll be suitable for you? You can do it online rather than going to see a therapist if you prefer.

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    Some doctors are happy to prescribe them and some are not. You can try but it doesn't sound like you've really given the talking treatments a proper go, they are awkward at first but you do have to commit for a period of time for it to help.
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    It depends on the circumstances. If the GP feels that you are in need of them, then they'll prescribe them but they will probably exercise caution because of your age; i.e. they may not go up to a high dose etc. If you tell the GP exactly how you feel and you make it clear how you feel, the the GP should give you the best course of treatment that's suitable to your needs. I think you should go talk to the GP and see what they say, and what they think is right for you, and then you decide if you agree.
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    What sort of antidepressants do GPs generally prescribe to the average patient? Do GPs require patients to go to therapy? I'd be happy to go to the GP if I could get the medication and forget the therapy tbh, would rather not talk about my life to some stranger who doesn't actually care.
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    What sort of antidepressants do GPs generally prescribe to the average patient? Do GPs require patients to go to therapy? I'd be happy to go to the GP if I could get the medication and forget the therapy tbh, would rather not talk about my life to some stranger who doesn't actually care.
    Usually start off on something like citalopram. They can't force you into therapy but I'd rethink your options if I were you. Anti depressants aren't going to get rid of severe depression, like I said, you need to look into the causes of your depression and address them. It's like putting a plaster over a bullet hole.
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    (Original post by Jenx301)
    Usually start off on something like citalopram. They can't force you into therapy but I'd rethink your options if I were you. Anti depressants aren't going to get rid of severe depression, like I said, you need to look into the causes of your depression and address them. It's like putting a plaster over a bullet hole.
    Whilst it might be unusual, antidepressants alone can sometimes cure severe depression. Depression does not always have tangible life-event causes but can be a purely physiological condition. Speaking from experience, I had a moderate/severe episode of depression a few years ago which came seemingly out of nowhere and was entirely cured with a course of antidepressants. Perhaps I am an unusual case but it's worth bearing in mind that medication alone can work for some people.

    I would always recommend that anyone with depression explores the different therapy and medication options available to them with their gp however. Antidepressants are pretty powerful meds and can make things worse before they get better (they made me suicidal before I started to improve) so the decision to start taking them should not, in my opinion, be taken lightly.

    OP, the only thing for you to do is discuss this with your GP and see what they say.


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    Yes, but that is not the usual situation with these things and in terms of the OP it sounds like stress from college etc is having an impact on her mental health. Stuff like CBT or other therapy might help with this and whatever else is going on. People shouldn't just look to drugs because they don't really like therapy much as it is not a quick fix, but it sounds like you know this. There are a lot of different types of therapy and a lot of different therapists all of which have an impact. Medication can be part of treatment but I don't believe that it should be used alone most of the time - especially when other treatment options haven't really been explored.

    Don't know if I am making sense here but yeh, I see where you are coming from.
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    (Original post by Jenx301)
    Yes, but that is not the usual situation with these things and in terms of the OP it sounds like stress from college etc is having an impact on her mental health. Stuff like CBT or other therapy might help with this and whatever else is going on. People shouldn't just look to drugs because they don't really like therapy much as it is not a quick fix, but it sounds like you know this. There are a lot of different types of therapy and a lot of different therapists all of which have an impact. Medication can be part of treatment but I don't believe that it should be used alone most of the time - especially when other treatment options haven't really been explored.

    Don't know if I am making sense here but yeh, I see where you are coming from.
    Yeah, that does make sense and I agree with what you've said. I think people should not be too quick to dismiss therapy, although I can also sympathise with not wanting to try it. I never wanted to talk to someone about how **** I felt as I knew it would be pointless, I just wanted to stop crying all the time and be able to function again. I think I would have found it very frustrating if I had been forced to try therapy before being given antidepressants as I strongly felt that I just wasn't 'right' biochemically and clearly meds were the answer for me. But yeah, antidepressants are a heavy handed way of solving things and it does sound like the op could have other things going on which need addressing.

    I suppose I just wanted to point out that people with experiences like mine do exist and we should stick up for what we think is the right treatment for us (guided by professional advice of course!). I didn't like the blanket statement in your first post that 'antidepressants alone will not cure severe depression'. But in general, evidence does seem to consistently suggest that a combination of therapy and meds works best for the majority of patients.


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    (Original post by Jenx301)
    Usually start off on something like citalopram. They can't force you into therapy but I'd rethink your options if I were you. Anti depressants aren't going to get rid of severe depression, like I said, you need to look into the causes of your depression and address them. It's like putting a plaster over a bullet hole.
    Therapy isn't going to address the cause either; I know what will but it's out of my control, so until it can be addressed antidepressants will help. Plus on antidepressants I'll be able to form stronger relationships with people and help cure the root cause of the problem. Not every depression is like yours, you know; not everybody benefits from therapy. Everybody is different.
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    Therapy isn't going to address the cause either; I know what will but it's out of my control, so until it can be addressed antidepressants will help. Plus on antidepressants I'll be able to form stronger relationships with people and help cure the root cause of the problem. Not every depression is like yours, you know; not everybody benefits from therapy. Everybody is different.
    Actually therapy is there to address the cause of depression and help you feel better able to cope with feelings of depression and stress. I never said every depression is the same - however research shows that anti depressants are most effective when used alongside talking treatments. You said you only went to a few counselling sessions and that will not be long enough to help severe depression usually.

    Also it is important to bare in mind that there are a lot of different types of therapy - for example CBT may be useful for some whereas for other people a more person centred counselling approach helps them most. Different therapists "fit" differently so where one therapist might not suit you at all, another may be just what you need. Going to a few sessions is not enough to say that you should just give up on therapy - especially when from your post it sounds like your depression stems from an environmental cause. These types of depression are suited to talking treatments.

    I never said everyones depression is the same; I simply said that you should not depend only on medication as it probably won't be the most effective thing on it's own. I have been on anti depressants myself so I do understand that they can be effective. There is no need to take an attitude with me.
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    (Original post by Jenx301)
    Actually therapy is there to address the cause of depression and help you feel better able to cope with feelings of depression and stress. I never said every depression is the same - however research shows that anti depressants are most effective when used alongside talking treatments. You said you only went to a few counselling sessions and that will not be long enough to help severe depression usually.

    Also it is important to bare in mind that there are a lot of different types of therapy - for example CBT may be useful for some whereas for other people a more person centred counselling approach helps them most. Different therapists "fit" differently so where one therapist might not suit you at all, another may be just what you need. Going to a few sessions is not enough to say that you should just give up on therapy - especially when from your post it sounds like your depression stems from an environmental cause. These types of depression are suited to talking treatments.

    I never said everyones depression is the same; I simply said that you should not depend only on medication as it probably won't be the most effective thing on it's own. I have been on anti depressants myself so I do understand that they can be effective. There is no need to take an attitude with me.
    My point is that therapy with a stranger isn't for everyone; and to blindly assert that it is, is short-sighted. I never said that medication alone is enough either. But if you feel better whilst on them in the short-term, you're more likely to be able to tackle the root problem in the long-term; there are other ways do this besides therapy. People heal in different ways and you should be more open to different possibilities rather than repeating your 'yay-therapy' mantra over and over.
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    My point is that therapy with a stranger isn't for everyone; and to blindly assert that it is, is short-sighted. I never said that medication alone is enough either. But if you feel better whilst on them in the short-term, you're more likely to be able to tackle the root problem in the long-term; there are other ways do this besides therapy. People heal in different ways and you should be more open to different possibilities rather than repeating your 'yay-therapy' mantra over and over.
    Arguably, the person you're arguing against is quite right with what they say. Whilst anti-depressants might get you to a more balanced stage where you're able to discuss your feelings and perceptions, it's therapy that is generally aimed at tackling the underlying cause of your problems. Anti-depressants aren't, sadly, a cure-all.
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    Therapy isn't going to address the cause either; I know what will but it's out of my control, so until it can be addressed antidepressants will help. Plus on antidepressants I'll be able to form stronger relationships with people and help cure the root cause of the problem. Not every depression is like yours, you know; not everybody benefits from therapy. Everybody is different.
    How do you know that you'll be able to form stronger relationships with people?

    I've been on two anti depressants for pain and the side effects were absolutely horrible and one of them were was unbelievably scary.
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    (Original post by OU Student)
    How do you know that you'll be able to form stronger relationships with people?

    I've been on two anti depressants for pain and the side effects were absolutely horrible and one of them were was unbelievably scary.
    That's never happened to me; I'm sorry that's happened to you. They've only ever benefited me, but I understand that they don't suit everybody. The one's I've been taking have brought me out of my depressed state temporarily, meaning I can socialise better - ergo better relationships - ergo a long term solution to depression - ergo taking less medication in the long term.
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    Please keep posts in here polite, on-topic and constructive in helping the OP.
 
 
 
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