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Should university degrees be relevant to the career? watch

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    Hey guys,

    I was wondering if when applying to university, the degree's should be relevant? If someone does not want to do medicine, or dentistry, or pharmacy, or artichecture, or teaching, what can they do?

    Is it simply the case where they have to just do any good degree, get a good grade, and from a good institution?

    I'm a little confused how it works. I chose medicine myself, but i'm not sure about what to do for my sibling who wants to apply.
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    (Original post by Tawheed)
    Hey guys,

    I was wondering if when applying to university, the degree's should be relevant? If someone does not want to do medicine, or dentistry, or pharmacy, or artichecture, or teaching, what can they do?

    Is it simply the case where they have to just do any good degree, get a good grade, and from a good institution?

    I'm a little confused how it works. I chose medicine myself, but i'm not sure about what to do for my sibling who wants to apply.
    Science based degrees, especially medicine, will lead into a science based job. That could be a doctor, nurse, radiologist or a lab technician for example.

    If you study a social science, or a humanities subject (history, politics, law and economics) then you will most likely pursue a graduate scheme.

    Pretty much every big firm that you can think off will have a graduate scheme of some kind or another. You could go into consulting, law, insurance, compliance, banking or technology.

    It doesn't necessarily matter what you study, so long as it's from a reputable University and you get good grades. Extra-curricular's are also important.

    Graduate schemes typically last for 2 years, and you apply in your final year of University. After those 2 years, you will get a permanent role at the firm.
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    TSR Support Team
    (Original post by SmaugTheTerrible)
    Science based degrees, especially medicine, will lead into a science based job. That could be a doctor, nurse, radiologist or a lab technician for example.

    If you study a social science, or a humanities subject (history, politics, law and economics) then you will most likely pursue a graduate scheme.

    Pretty much every big firm that you can think off will have a graduate scheme of some kind or another. You could go into consulting, law, insurance, compliance, banking or technology.

    It doesn't necessarily matter what you study, so long as it's from a reputable University and you get good grades. Extra-curricular's are also important.

    Graduate schemes typically last for 2 years, and you apply in your final year of University. After those 2 years, you will get a permanent role at the firm.
    This^

    Also, OP, I'd urge you to apply for internships in the areas you are interested in. They take place in the summer of your penultimate year of university, and generally lead on to a spot on the graduate scheme with that company.

    If you're at all interested in IB, it's absolutely PARAMOUNT that you get on one of these internships, otherwise you'll have to deal with nigh on impossible competition to get on to the grad schemes at the banks

    Echoing the above, a technical degree (science, maths, comp sci, engineering) can lead on to both technical roles and non-technical roles a like. Upwards of 70% of grad schemes don't actually specify a degree subject requirement, so there's a lot of choice out there.

    The take away is to do something you'll enjoy doing (and will be good at) for 3+ years, but at the same time remember to build up a solid CV in order to have a decent shot of a grad job.

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    (Original post by Princepieman)
    This^

    Also, OP, I'd urge you to apply for internships in the areas you are interested in. They take place in the summer of your penultimate year of university, and generally lead on to a spot on the graduate scheme with that company.

    If you're at all interested in IB, it's absolutely PARAMOUNT that you get on one of these internships, otherwise you'll have to deal with nigh on impossible competition to get on to the grad schemes at the banks

    Echoing the above, a technical degree (science, maths, comp sci, engineering) can lead on to both technical roles and non-technical roles a like. Upwards of 70% of grad schemes don't actually specify a degree subject requirement, so there's a lot of choice out there.

    The take away is to do something you'll enjoy doing (and will be good at) for 3+ years, but at the same time remember to build up a solid CV in order to have a decent shot of a grad job.

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    Thank you so much - this is for my little brother, i'm doing a degree in medicine(as a job is simply given at the end, i was not educated about how people who go through other perhaps non-vocational routes find success) , but i really want him to pursue something he is passionate for and have the option

    You guys have been incredibly useful!

    Is there anywhere i can find preferred degree subjects? Or the websites where companies discuss applications or what they look for?

    Does going to a more prestigious university give one a better chance?
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