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    Can someone please explain to me the differences and which is best?
    Thank you.
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    (Original post by outside)
    Can someone please explain to me the differences and which is best?
    Thank you.
    It depends on the uni offering as French law would mean you study the law of France alongside English law whereas just French would be the language only


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    Go wild. Go Spanish.
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    Well I would do French law if you might want to practise in France in the future, although I'm pretty sure you would have to take the conversion anyway. Otherwise do French which is like 100x easier
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    (Original post by outside)
    Can someone please explain to me the differences and which is best?
    Thank you.
    As above.

    Difficult to say which is best, although if the French law component is sufficient for the degree to be dual qualifying in English and French law (a Double Maitrise) then that is worthwhile doing.

    If the degree is not a qualifying French law degree, the usefulness of the foreign aspect of your degree is largely a matter of it demonstrating linguistic skill. Nevertheless, if you've studied French law in France it may demonstrate a higher level of proficiency in French than simply going to France for a year, or studying French modules here.
 
 
 
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