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    I have always been interested in History and as I get older, I'm becoming more used to the idea of children haha. I went to university last year and it was the worst experience of my life. I completed the year to get the credits and so it wouldn't be a complete waste but I've never really know what I've wanted to do with my life. After that experience, I've wanted to avoid university as much as possible and as a result of the whole experience, I have had to apply for benefits and look for jobs. I really want to improve my situation and not just land any job that I'm not interested in. Money really helps but if I could teach history, something that I'm actually interested in, I think things would be easier, now as well as in the long term. Is there any way I can get into teaching without having to go back to university. Is Open University a bad idea while having employment just to keep the bills paid and the food on the table, so to speak?
    I have a lot of people around me with negative opinions of OU but still want me to get a degree. Being on benefits was the worst decision I had to make but it enables me to survive day to day. I just want to do the best for everybody and make a better future for myself and my fiance.
    Advice/Guidance would be appreciated!
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    (Original post by Vampiress)
    Sorry to jump in on the conversation and steal the thunder a little bit but I'm also in the same boat. I have always been interested in History and as I get older, I'm becoming more used to the idea of children haha. I went to university last year and it was the worst experience of my life. I completed the year to get the credits and so it wouldn't be a complete waste but I've never really know what I've wanted to do with my life. After that experience, I've wanted to avoid university as much as possible and as a result of the whole experience, I have had to apply for benefits and look for jobs. I really want to improve my situation and not just land any job that I'm not interested in. Money really helps but if I could teach history, something that I'm actually interested in, I think things would be easier, now as well as in the long term. Is there any way I can get into teaching without having to go back to university. Is Open University a bad idea while having employment just to keep the bills paid and the food on the table, so to speak?
    I have a lot of people around me with negative opinions of OU but still want me to get a degree. Being on benefits was the worst decision I had to make but it enables me to survive day to day. I just want to do the best for everybody and make a better future for myself and my fiance.
    Advice/Guidance would be appreciated!
    You absolutely need a degree to teach, there is no way around this. The question is, how do you get the degree? The OU is a perfectly good option, lots of OU graduates go into teaching and their degrees are designed for part-time students so you could work alongside your studies. If you have done the first year of a degree at another university then you can transfer those credits to the OU.

    I have the PDF book versions for the OU module 'Exploring history: medieval to modern 1400-1900' if you're interested to see what the course is like.
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    Private schools can employ anyone as a teachers and so can academies and free schools. They don't need a degree. 3.8% of teachers in the state sector are unqualified.
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    (Original post by Maker)
    Private schools can employ anyone as a teachers and so can academies and free schools. They don't need a degree. 3.8% of teachers in the state sector are unqualified.
    They can technically hire unqualified teachers (someone without a PGCE), although few do. But hiring a teacher without a degree is pretty much unheard of these days.
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    (Original post by Snufkin)
    They can technically hire unqualified teachers (someone without a PGCE), although few do. But hiring a teacher without a degree is pretty much unheard of these days.
    There are a lot of people with relevant skills and knowledge gained in the public or private sector that don't have degrees. Schools should be free to recruit them because they bring a lot of knowledge about what students learn in the classroom is used in the workplace, something a lot of teachers who go straight from uni to teach don't have.
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    (Original post by Maker)
    There are a lot of people with relevant skills and knowledge gained in the public or private sector that don't have degrees. Schools should be free to recruit them because they bring a lot of knowledge about what students learn in the classroom is used in the workplace, something a lot of teachers who go straight from uni to teach don't have.
    Not the point. Fact is no degree = no job.
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    (Original post by Maker)
    Free school teachers don't necessarily need degrees.
    except these people are not Teachers and not employed as Teachers ... even if they do teach classes ...

    I would also be interested if there were any examples of such staff without levle 5 or 6 qualifications at the bare minimum ...
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    There is a very strong bias towards academic subjects on this thread.

    It is possible to have an nvq level 3 (or the equivalent) in a vocational subject and five years experience and then train to teach in a college. Plumbing, makeup, catering etc etc. Even with accounting a lot of colleges treat it as a vocation.

    So yeah, it is possible to teach some subjects in a college without a degree, albeit probably after sone teacher training.
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    You could perhaps work in a free school if you had a lot of industry experience but generally yes you need at least a undergrad degree. And most schools would also require you to have QTS or be working towards it (there are several routes you can take to gain QTS).
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    (Original post by beautifulbigmacs)
    There is a very strong bias towards academic subjects on this thread.

    It is possible to have an nvq level 3 (or the equivalent) in a vocational subject and five years experience and then train to teach in a college. Plumbing, makeup, catering etc etc. Even with accounting a lot of colleges treat it as a vocation.

    So yeah, it is possible to teach some subjects in a college without a degree, albeit probably after sone teacher training.
    The OP said they want to teach history, not plumbing. :erm:
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    Yeah, no way around it for history teaching. If the need to teach is more about the teaching than the subject though, there are other ways.
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    The last time my geography teacher learnt geography was when he was in year 9, and now he's a geography teacher. He also teaches R.E and he didn't even study that post 16. So I'm sure you can be a teacher without that degree? My IT teacher has a degree in Social Sciences.
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    (Original post by geniequeen48)
    The last time my geography teacher learnt geography was when he was in year 9, and now he's a geography teacher. He also teaches R.E and he didn't even study that post 16. So I'm sure you can be a teacher without that degree? My IT teacher has a degree in Social Sciences.
    But they still have degrees - unfortunately no degree=no job. The pay rate for unqualified teachers just simply isn't enough IMO.

    OP, there's nothing wrong with completing your degree through the open university. Why did you hate it so much?

    Unfortunately, history is a very popular and competitive subject to train to teach in and you would need a relevant degree in order to train to be a history teacher.
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    The Pay Policies of most state schools (whether academies or not) allow anyone to be employed on the unqualified teacher scale. Anyone. That's people with degrees but no teaching qualifications, people with no degrees, even people without A levels.

    This is a clause that was encouraged by the last Government, when performance-related pay came in, to support their ill-fated Troops to Teachers scheme (or whatever it was called... anyway it was unsuccessful). It wasn't enforced but Governors at many (most? It would be impossible to find out the figures without ploughing through every school's Pay Policy) schools adopted it to give more flexibility if needed for the impending teacher shortage.

    In practice, schools tend to use it to allow specialist instructors to be paid on the unqualified teacher scale - for example swimming coaches who aren't PE teachers.

    But there also occasions where schools have identified talented TAs (primary and secondary) who have heaps of experience but no formal qualifications post-GCSE (or 'O' level as is often the case, we're talking older individuals) and employed them as unqualified teachers. Some of them then go on to further study and recognised teaching qualifications, others don't. This absolutely isn't a recommended route into teaching though, it's more a case of 'you're practically doing the job already, might as well reward you for it'.


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    (Original post by Maker)
    Private schools can employ anyone as a teachers and so can academies and free schools. They don't need a degree. 3.8% of teachers in the state sector are unqualified.
    You're making this seems like 3.8% don't have a degree.

    In reality, these 3.8% are people like: retiring professors, retiring bankers, people with a PhD but not a PGCE, people with a first-class degree without QTS etc. Not college dropouts and cleaners completed only primary education.
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    (Original post by Maker)
    There are a lot of people with relevant skills and knowledge gained in the public or private sector that don't have degrees. Schools should be free to recruit them because they bring a lot of knowledge about what students learn in the classroom is used in the workplace, something a lot of teachers who go straight from uni to teach don't have.
    Is it unreasonable to expect educator to be educated and have an aptitude in education?

    We're not even talking about someone who is very academically capable but can't be bothered to do a degree.
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    (Original post by geniequeen48)
    The last time my geography teacher learnt geography was when he was in year 9, and now he's a geography teacher. He also teaches R.E and he didn't even study that post 16. So I'm sure you can be a teacher without that degree? My IT teacher has a degree in Social Sciences.
    First of all, you cannot compare the older generation to the newer. It's more competitive now than before.

    Secondly, they both have a degree so this is a moot point.
 
 
 
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