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    Hi everyone, intending to do computer science (plainest variant available).

    Have been going to open days, and must say I'm rather shocked at the reaction of various people in the departments at unis by the fact that I have substantial programming and computing experience from school. I'm assuming it's because of the lack of schools offering the subject, so with 4 years of programming experience 'under my belt' and if I mention this on my personal statement, I was wondering how much of an advantage in getting on a course at uni this gives me?

    I was doing a 'taster' lesson today in programming, and it was extremely basic python work and I absolutely flew through it compared to others who mainly seemed to be at the 'beginner' level. Many current students mentioned that they came in to the degree with no experience and that quite frankly I'd probably have a bit of a dos of a first year. I'm no expert programmer but am certainly confident with 4 languages.

    My ambitious choice will be Birmingham, absolutely loved their computer science school, however, 3 As, whilst I consider myself somewhat intelligent, is probably out of my reach. Having spoken to some students there who also hadn't done the subject at school, I wondered how much, potentially, my experience in this area could make it any easier for me to get in? Would it effectively 'lower' the requirements for me at all?

    Thanks.
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    Most universities that offer Computer Science design their courses to suit people who have absolutely no programming experience whatsoever (for the first year). This is because, as you say, not many schools offer Computer Science and so it would be unfair to make it a requirement. I personally haven't done GCSE or GCE Computer Science - I do however have substantial programming experience that I have detailed on my personal statement.

    I would doubt they'd make lower offers for people who have it. Most Computer Science courses require X grade in Maths only. That said, talking about it in your personal statement would definitely be beneficial and I would hazard a guess and say that if they had the choice of offering a place to someone with programming experience vs no programming experience (with similar grades and other circumstances notwithstanding) the person with programming experience would get the offer.
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    (Original post by GordonH49)
    Hi everyone, intending to do computer science (plainest variant available).

    Have been going to open days, and must say I'm rather shocked at the reaction of various people in the departments at unis by the fact that I have substantial programming and computing experience from school. I'm assuming it's because of the lack of schools offering the subject, so with 4 years of programming experience 'under my belt' and if I mention this on my personal statement, I was wondering how much of an advantage in getting on a course at uni this gives me?

    I was doing a 'taster' lesson today in programming, and it was extremely basic python work and I absolutely flew through it compared to others who mainly seemed to be at the 'beginner' level. Many current students mentioned that they came in to the degree with no experience and that quite frankly I'd probably have a bit of a dos of a first year. I'm no expert programmer but am certainly confident with 4 languages.

    My ambitious choice will be Birmingham, absolutely loved their computer science school, however, 3 As, whilst I consider myself somewhat intelligent, is probably out of my reach. Having spoken to some students there who also hadn't done the subject at school, I wondered how much, potentially, my experience in this area could make it any easier for me to get in? Would it effectively 'lower' the requirements for me at all?

    Thanks.
    Nottingham offer AAB to those who are doing Computing/Computer Science A-levels.

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    Requirements are a bit lower for those who have taken computer science as compared to those who have not taken it.You could easily get in a Russell group uni if you could get an AAB with an A in maths

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    (Original post by GordonH49)
    Hi everyone, intending to do computer science (plainest variant available).

    Have been going to open days, and must say I'm rather shocked at the reaction of various people in the departments at unis by the fact that I have substantial programming and computing experience from school. I'm assuming it's because of the lack of schools offering the subject, so with 4 years of programming experience 'under my belt' and if I mention this on my personal statement, I was wondering how much of an advantage in getting on a course at uni this gives me?

    I was doing a 'taster' lesson today in programming, and it was extremely basic python work and I absolutely flew through it compared to others who mainly seemed to be at the 'beginner' level. Many current students mentioned that they came in to the degree with no experience and that quite frankly I'd probably have a bit of a dos of a first year. I'm no expert programmer but am certainly confident with 4 languages.

    My ambitious choice will be Birmingham, absolutely loved their computer science school, however, 3 As, whilst I consider myself somewhat intelligent, is probably out of my reach. Having spoken to some students there who also hadn't done the subject at school, I wondered how much, potentially, my experience in this area could make it any easier for me to get in? Would it effectively 'lower' the requirements for me at all?

    Thanks.
    My offer from Birmingham is AAA and I have an A* in GCSE Computing and an A at AS.

    Birmingham were lenient for Computer Science last year come results day, and some people with ABB were being accepted. However, every year's different and it's incredibly hard to predicted what the unis will do, so don't let that sway your decision too much.
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    universities (from my own research, there is also a page on st Andrews websites about it) are not interested in your list of programming skills, if you have them, GREAT, but when writing about them in your personal statement explain what you have learnt and why it has encouraged you to want to study computer science as a whole. They want to teach enthusiastic intelligent students, your best chance of a lower offer is showing passion and interest (such as an epq qualification)
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    I'm pretty sure unis wouldn't lower the requirements for the course based on the fact that you have prior programming experience, as the course is pretty much taught from scratch anyway and the programming is relatively easy to pick up
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    (Original post by AmarRPM)
    I'm pretty sure unis wouldn't lower the requirements for the course based on the fact that you have prior programming experience, as the course is pretty much taught from scratch anyway and the programming is relatively easy to pick up
    Some uni's do but if you have done computer science earlier most uni's prefer to take you in
 
 
 
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