Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free
x Turn on thread page Beta
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Hi everyone, I want to study something in which I will learn programming, but there are many different courses and I don't really know which one suits best for me. There is Computer Science and Computing right? But what's the difference between them?

    I'm studying AS level this year and next year I'll do A2. The subjects I'm doing are physics (which I suck at), maths (I find it hard but I keep working on it), ICT and economics.

    I don't want to do anything related to hardware, but I don't mind having to study the basics.

    Can someone explain me the difference between Computer Science and Computing and give any extra info that may be useful?

    Thanks everyone, this is my first post, sorry if it's a mess .
    Offline

    21
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Geminom)
    Hi everyone, I want to study something in which I will learn programming, but there are many different courses and I don't really know which one suits best for me. There is Computer Science and Computing right? But what's the difference between them?

    I'm studying AS level this year and next year I'll do A2. The subjects I'm doing are physics (which I suck at), maths (I find it hard but I keep working on it), ICT and economics.

    I don't want to do anything related to hardware, but I don't mind having to study the basics.

    Can someone explain me the difference between Computer Science and Computing and give any extra info that may be useful?

    Thanks everyone, this is my first post, sorry if it's a mess .
    I was in the same boat as you when I was applying for uni, so I'll share what I learnt when I was trying to decide.

    Computing, from what I gathered, is a lot like the uni version of ICT. There may be a little programming, but most of it is stuff like database design or web page design. Computer Science is "proper" computing, lot's of coding, learning computer architecture, learning about functions of an OS ect.
    Unfortunately, I think no matter what computer course you're going to go for, you're always going to have to learn some things about hardware. Which is a shame because that's the most boring bit.

    Your A level subjects sound perfect for either of them, most places asked me for around BBB with at least one "technical" subject, like physics, computing or maths. If you have 2, then I think you'll be in a stronger position.

    I didn't go for either of these in the end, I chose Computer Games Programming in which we do coding (C++ and then Java after Christmas), maths and computer architecture, but we also learn games design and how to use game making software.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Zargabaath)
    I was in the same boat as you when I was applying for uni, so I'll share what I learnt when I was trying to decide.

    Computing, from what I gathered, is a lot like the uni version of ICT. There may be a little programming, but most of it is stuff like database design or web page design. Computer Science is "proper" computing, lot's of coding, learning computer architecture, learning about functions of an OS ect.
    Unfortunately, I think no matter what computer course you're going to go for, you're always going to have to learn some things about hardware. Which is a shame because that's the most boring bit.

    Your A level subjects sound perfect for either of them, most places asked me for around BBB with at least one "technical" subject, like physics, computing or maths. If you have 2, then I think you'll be in a stronger position.

    I didn't go for either of these in the end, I chose Computer Games Programming in which we do coding (C++ and then Java after Christmas), maths and computer architecture, but we also learn games design and how to use game making software.
    Thank you very much! I would also like to make games, but I've heard it's even more difficult, plus what are the chances that some big company like EA or Bethesda or any other is going to hire me? You have to be the best of the best.

    What's your opinion on this? Or are you planning on joining a smaller studio? Making games would be awesome, but that's the problem, I think it's one of the most difficult jobs.
    Offline

    21
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Geminom)
    Thank you very much! I would also like to make games, but I've heard it's even more difficult, plus what are the chances that some big company like EA or Bethesda or any other is going to hire me? You have to be the best of the best.

    What's your opinion on this? Or are you planning on joining a smaller studio? Making games would be awesome, but that's the problem, I think it's one of the most difficult jobs.
    Honestly, I think the chances of ending up in any established games companies are pretty slim, let alone one of the giants like EA or Bethesda. But I knew that before I signed up. Indie is probably the most realistic option and I'm thinking of setting one up after I've finished my course, but even that is a tough career choice. For every indie game that "makes it" tons more are going to go totally unnoticed. For example look at the makers of Candy Crush, aside from all the clones they made of that game I couldn't name a single other game of theirs and I'm sure most people couldn't either.

    The reason I still went for the course is because the games industry isn't the only thing you can go into. At the end of the day you have a programming degree and a professional looking portfolio. That means you can work in all sorts of programming jobs, not just video games.

    EDIT: I should add that I'm currently loving my course as well, I know it's only halfway through the first term, but so far I regret nothing.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Don't know if this is any help but I had never done any programming before but was interested in a degree which is relevant to ICT and business, and I found the information technology management for business degree which contains a slight bit of programming but doesn't sound like it focuses on hardware at all, obviously not that helpful if you don't want it to do with business management, but it was created by e-skills and I think that there is another one similar without the business aspects called software development. Don't know if that's any help but it might be worth googling that as it isn't too focused on computer science I don't think


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Geminom)
    There is Computer Science and Computing right? But what's the difference between them?...Can someone explain me the difference between Computer Science and Computing and give any extra info that may be useful?
    I believe it is related more to the way a course is being marketed.

    A brief browse through UCAS suggests that computing courses tend to include more applied content, or be based in practice-orientated institutions. All the while, computer science courses tend to include broader theoretical, stronger mathematical, and more academic content, or be based in research-orientated institutions. However, the trend is weak. Both courses draw from the same IEEE/ACM Joint Curricular Framework (see http://www.acm.org/education/curricula-recommendations) and differently titled courses have equivalent accreditation by the Bristish Computer Society (http://wam.bcs.org/wam/coursesearch.aspx).

    Comparing module titles and lists of indicative content seems to be the best way to distinguish between the courses.

    You may also be interested in reviewing the following post: http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/show...6#post29651296

    (Original post by Geminom)
    I don't want to do anything related to hardware, but I don't mind having to study the basics.
    The distinction between computer science and computer engineering is much clearer. As a rule of thumb, courses based in engineering departments (i.e., those offering BEng) tend to involve more hardware.

    (Original post by Geminom)
    I would also like to make games, but I've heard it's even more difficult, plus what are the chances that some big company like EA or Bethesda or any other is going to hire me? You have to be the best of the best.
    The AAA industry in the UK is smaller than the USA and Canada, and correspondingly quite selective (relative to the number of graduates). There are, however, huge opportunities in the indie and small developer space for innovative and creative games. These are supported by huge emerging markets outside of the EU and the USA.

    Further to this, the skills that you learn in computing for games (i.e., programming, algorithms, real-time interactive simulation, etc.) are highly transferable to other fields. For example, eHealth and educational technology have gigantic markets and there is a lot of scope for using such skills to develop human-centered computer-based products.

    Skillset has a list of accredited games programming courses (http://creativeskillset.org/search/3...=Undergraduate). Further to this list, Brunel University (London) received exemplary NSS and employability results (http://unistats.direct.gov.uk/Subjec...UGAMESDE-FT-BA) and several of the lecturers teaching that course (including the two course directors) recently left to setup the Games Academy at Falmouth University (http://www.falmouth.ac.uk/games-academy), and recently launched a BSc Computing for Games course.
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Zargabaath)
    I was in the same boat as you when I was applying for uni, so I'll share what I learnt when I was trying to decide.

    Computing, from what I gathered, is a lot like the uni version of ICT. There may be a little programming, but most of it is stuff like database design or web page design. Computer Science is "proper" computing, lot's of coding, learning computer architecture, learning about functions of an OS ect.
    Unfortunately, I think no matter what computer course you're going to go for, you're always going to have to learn some things about hardware. Which is a shame because that's the most boring bit.

    Your A level subjects sound perfect for either of them, most places asked me for around BBB with at least one "technical" subject, like physics, computing or maths. If you have 2, then I think you'll be in a stronger position.

    I didn't go for either of these in the end, I chose Computer Games Programming in which we do coding (C++ and then Java after Christmas), maths and computer architecture, but we also learn games design and how to use game making software.
    Not necessarily, look at Imperial's Computing course. http://www.imperial.ac.uk/computing/...ing/beng-comp/
 
 
 
Reply
Submit reply
Turn on thread page Beta
TSR Support Team

We have a brilliant team of more than 60 Support Team members looking after discussions on The Student Room, helping to make it a fun, safe and useful place to hang out.

Updated: November 18, 2015
Poll
Are you going to a festival?

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Write a reply...
Reply
Hide
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.