What does oxidised/reduced mean in this context?

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FluffyCherry
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#1
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#1
I know that there are two meanings to oxidised/ oxidation and reduced/ reduction.
Oxidation
1) loss of electrons
2) gain of oxygen

Reduction
1) Gain of electrons
2) loss of oxygen

So in the reaction of acidified potassium manganate (VII) with alkenes, it says that the alkene has been oxidised whereas the potassium manganate (VII) has been reduced.
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pineneedles
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(Original post by FluffyCherry)
I know that there are two meanings to oxidised/ oxidation and reduced/ reduction.
Oxidation
1) loss of electrons
2) gain of oxygen

Reduction
1) Gain of electrons
2) loss of oxygen

So in the reaction of acidified potassium manganate (VII), it says that the alkene has been oxidised whereas the potassium manganate (VII) has been reduced.
What reaction of acidified potassium manganate (VII)?
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FluffyCherry
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#3
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#3
(Original post by pineneedles)
What reaction of acidified potassium manganate (VII)?
With alkenes.
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FluffyCherry
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pineneedles
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#5
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#5
Apologies for not replying to you earlier, I thought I had.
Oxidation and reduction can also be thought of in terms of hydrogen. If an organic compound gains hydrogen, it has been reduced, whereas if a compound loses hydrogen, it has been oxidised. With some reactions it's more clear to see what has been reduced or oxidised if you look at it in terms of oxygen/hydrogen, particularly with organic chemistry.
Also, potassium manganate's oxidation number should decrease, so if you see this, it has gained electrons.
I'm sorry I can't be more specific, I haven't studied this reaction, I'm just trying to apply what I know to it.
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username986184
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#6
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#6
(Original post by FluffyCherry)
I know that there are two meanings to oxidised/ oxidation and reduced/ reduction.
Oxidation
1) loss of electrons
2) gain of oxygen

Reduction
1) Gain of electrons
2) loss of oxygen

So in the reaction of acidified potassium manganate (VII) with alkenes, it says that the alkene has been oxidised whereas the potassium manganate (VII) has been reduced.
Manganese goes from oxidation number 7 to 2. It's reduced.

The alkene double bond becomes a diol. It's oxidised.
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