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    No generation or generation/s have been in as deep a technological revolution as the young people of today. Things will probably look quite unrecognisable when those in their teens and 20s are reaching the end of their natural lives. But how will the human decision makers play things as machines take over more and more human jobs?

    Many are convinced it will, after a few stumbles, spell utopia and every human will be able to do as they please - find the peak of their talents at their own pace and basically do whatever they please with their time. Happy people, happy society, crime almost eradicated...you get the picture.

    I suggest these people need a few history lessons. The people in charge, even in our enlightened western world, have always been for their own ends and giving back to society as little as they can get away with before sparking a revolution. What makes people think a robot revolution will spell utopia for all? When the majority of the "normal" humans have become surplus to requirements i.e. not needed for any jobs, not even needed to divide and rule the rest of society, why would those with huge power keep them around? Survival of the fittest is in my view absolutely true and with technology advancing ever further, this maxim could be tested to its limits for humankind.

    I'm no fan of Margaret Thatcher to say the least but she said "there is no such thing as society" - I may not want to agree with that personally or compassionately speaking, but the cold hard truth of it is correct, no? Society technically owes most people nothing. Most people work hard in their given career, sure, they train for years perhaps, but most people will never contribute anything fresh or innovative to society. A parent's decision to have children is where each life starts - a society doesn't start that process. So you could say the only people who owe you anything are your parents, and they should be able to provide for their kids for life. This is of course a ridiculous sounding theory, but in the case of billionaires and multi millionaires they are actually able to provide for their offspring without them ever having to work. Again, survival of the fittest and not necessarily just about those who work hard or even in some sad cases those who excel talent wise.

    So my main question is really what I put in the title - how do you see the future looking over the next 10, 20, 30 years and beyond with regards technology? Utopia calling, or the complete opposite? Why would those in control of the means of production want to maintain the majority of the population who have now become useless to them? All of the negatives with none of the positives. Even culling 80% of the world population through a world war or something would still leave a good number to preserve the future of humanity. Sorry if this whole notion sounds peverse, but I really don't understand the theories that the more technologically developed we become, the better the world will be for the majority. The survival instinct is king; I argue that this may be tested to the maximum in the medium-long term future.
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    I don't think robots could replace humans at everything.
    If they did the economy would crumble down in days
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    I think it's an incredibly important question, and a question that hasn't been thought about nearly as much as it should. I'm not sure whether it's even possible to stop technological development but I think the direction we're heading towards at the moment is reckless to say the least. I am not at all convinced that the advent of artificial intelligence would result in a utopia, instead I would have thought it would create yet another division for inequality - and it could be a permanent division.

    One of the problems with thinking about the consequences of AI is that it feels completely unreal. In a similar fashion to climate change, it's not a risk that the public is really capable of taking seriously.
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    This is all a very good point. I'm of the opinion that unemployment is a more serious problem than climate change.

    Technology has killed more jobs than anybody can keep count of and will continue to do so in the future. This raises a question what to do with all the millions of unemployed people that the economy cannot absorb. One possibility is a complete reform of the tax system away from income tax onto taxation of things like corporate profits, land value, and financial transactions that used to fund a citizen's income but the problem is the high level of public support for the Protestant work ethic where people must work for money and not live off benefits. I believe that scrapping income tax, or at least having a high tax free allowance of say £40,000, will remove this us vs them attitude between people who work and people who don't work.
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    (Original post by Arran90)
    This is all a very good point. I'm of the opinion that unemployment is a more serious problem than climate change.

    Technology has killed more jobs than anybody can keep count of and will continue to do so in the future. This raises a question what to do with all the millions of unemployed people that the economy cannot absorb. One possibility is a complete reform of the tax system away from income tax onto taxation of things like corporate profits, land value, and financial transactions that used to fund a citizen's income but the problem is the high level of public support for the Protestant work ethic where people must work for money and not live off benefits. I believe that scrapping income tax, or at least having a high tax free allowance of say £40,000, will remove this us vs them attitude between people who work and people who don't work.
    Good ideas! Thought of working in a government department? :P
 
 
 
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