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How much harder is A level chemistry than GCSE watch

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    I did my GCSE chemistry a year early and I did it in year 10. I am in year 11 now and I am considering it for one of my A Level options. What I want to know is how much harder are A Levels for chemistry, how much more information is there; how much more difficult is it to comprehend and understand. The concepts in GCSE were not incredibly difficult and I personally found it a breeze and it was easy to grasp the concepts of the new knowledge and understand it but how much harder is it to be able to do all of this at A Level.
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    Its much more advanced. A lot more working things out then recalling facts. Its well respected tho. Youcould always try a past paper!
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    I did double science ocr gcse and I found science quite boring and got an BA. Im doing a level chemistry now and I really, really enjoy it. Its a lot less fact based so far and I don't have to learn some of the pointless stuff they put in gcse.

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    much... mUCH... MUCH harder

    i got AA*A in triple science - all As across the triple science and coursework modules

    only got a C at AS

    i was someone who was 'good at chemistry'

    chemistry is my favourite science

    it's ****ing hard
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    (Original post by z33)
    much... mUCH... MUCH harder

    i got AA*A in triple science - all As across the triple science and coursework modules

    only got a C at AS

    i was someone who was 'good at chemistry'

    chemistry is my favourite science

    it's ****ing hard
    What percentage are the grade boundaries usually for chemistry A Level? Also do you think that the grades achieved at GCSE will, most of the time, show any correlation to how you perform at A Level.
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    (Original post by earthworm)
    Its much more advanced. A lot more working things out then recalling facts. Its well respected tho. Youcould always try a past paper!
    That is good to hear. I hate memorising facts I find it much easier to just work everything.
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    (Original post by Samii123)
    What percentage are the grade boundaries usually for chemistry A Level? Also do you think that the grades achieved at GCSE will, most of the time, show any correlation to how you perform at A Level.
    Well we're still using our GCSE knowledge in A2 right now, all the reactivity series stuff, knowing the groups and how they react. You have to have a solid base to build on. - those who struggle with chemistry at GCSE will definitely struggle at Alevel

    percentages may differ depending on how everyone else does and the examboards etc, but it's usually 80% for an A, 70% for a B, 60% for a C etc
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    There's a lot of fact based learning, such as reaction conditions, colours of structures and compounds, mechanisms, definitions and practical knowledge, however more than 1/2 is applied stuff.
    The facts are somewhat easy to learn, and the applied stuff is fun. It's hard enough to challenge, but very much doable. (I got an A at AS, currently doing A2 and plan to do chemistry at university).
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    (Original post by Samii123)
    I did my GCSE chemistry a year early and I did it in year 10. I am in year 11 now and I am considering it for one of my A Level options. What I want to know is how much harder are A Levels for chemistry, how much more information is there; how much more difficult is it to comprehend and understand. The concepts in GCSE were not incredibly difficult and I personally found it a breeze and it was easy to grasp the concepts of the new knowledge and understand it but how much harder is it to be able to do all of this at A Level.
    I personally didn't find AS Chemistry to be the big step up everyone claims it to be. Although, I did get 395/400 in the GCSE so I might not be the best person to judge. You should be fine as long as you have a good understanding of the principles taught at GCSE. The first few weeks consists of going over a lot of the existing knowledge that people might not have understood properly the first time round. After you get past that stage there's a lot of learning and practising to be done. I found the new content genuinely interesting so it was quite easy to remember for me, but not everyone feels the same way.

    (Original post by Samii123)
    What percentage are the grade boundaries usually for chemistry A Level? Also do you think that the grades achieved at GCSE will, most of the time, show any correlation to how you perform at A Level.
    On OCR A, the boundaries are usually around the 80% (or just under) for an A, 40% for an E level. None of this 30/60 for a B stuff like you get in GCSE. I think there will be some correlation between GCSE and A-Level performance but not loads. Most people getting an A will have got an A* at GCSE though.
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    I got A*A* in Double Award Science at GCSE and i have found there to be quite a large step up from GCSE, but there are jumps with all subjects. Some of the concepts are definitely harder to understand, i mean at GCSE it was easy to understand but at A-level it isn't as easy to grasp. Even though I'm finding challenging I'm really liking the course so far and I'm doing very well in it so far.

    All A-Levels will pose students some challenges. I would say if you liked GCSE Chemistry and if it may be relevant to something you want to do in the future, then you should take it.
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    I only got CC I double science at GCSE but was the only one in a class of 20 who got an A. Out of 20 there was 1 A (me), 1 B, 1C and the rest were E's and U's and these are people who all got A/A* in triple at GCSE. I had the worst GCSE's by far but got the best result and am now predicted an A* and have applied to study it at university. If you put the effort it you'll be fine, but as I think I have demonstrated; GCSE is not a predictor of A-Level Chemistry

    Sorry to ramble haha
 
 
 
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