Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free
x Turn on thread page Beta
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    Hi everyone!
    Just wondering if anyone has an interview with Manchester this Wednesday.
    My interview is for Biology and i'm slightly nervous but my teachers gave me a practice interview which went really well - hoping for an ABB offer!
    Does anyone have any tips or advice they'd like to share? It'd be much appreciated!!!
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    I had an interview for Biology too, they're fairly straightforward. If I recall correctly (it was quite a while ago now) the day went something like this:

    Get there and register at Stopford building, then you're taken to a room to mingle for a bit until everyone is registered. There'll be student ambassadors who you can interrogate and I'd recommend asking them as much as you can, be about the department, accommodation, the city and so on.

    Then you have an introductory talk from the head of department and someone else whose position I can't remember at the moment. They'll give you an overview of the department, what it'll be like to study there, opportunities and all that stuff. After that, you'll be allocated a group (by the highly technical system of calling out people's names) and then the day varies after that. The main things to do are a tour of campus, the interview itself and a practical session. Different groups do things in different orders.

    You'll be shown around the Life Sciences department - eg Michael Smith building, Stopford building, the latter of which is where I had my interview (and presumably you'll have yours) - as well as other parts of the uni - University Place, the Main Library and so on. You'll be in a group with other candidates, normally about 4-5 I think, though I'm not sure as my group was just me and one other person (but that was unusually small). The groups are lead by a student ambassador or two, who are fountains of knowledge that, again, I recommend tapping into.

    The practical was about genetics and phenotypes of fruit flies and how fruit flies can be used as a model species. It's easy enough, but it's fun and the woman who was running it when I went was hilarious (and a bit nuts, too, but in a fun way).

    As for the interview, it's very relaxed and straightforward. Lasts about fifteen minutes, they'll ask you questions about your personal statement, your studies, your personality etc. They're not overly probing questions. I was asked if I thought I was at a disadvantage having not done chemistry A Level, which was probably the most difficult question. Most of it was spent discussing neurolinguistics, actually, because my interviewer was a neuroscientist and I'd put about doing an online course on neurolinguistics in my personal statement. Ended up talking about Noam Chomsky and Steven Pinker for a bit. We also briefly discussed the limitations of biological explanations for psychology (this was when she asked me about my psychology A Level) which got pretty philosophical for a fifteen minute interview. She asked about my EPQ briefly, as well as my favourite areas of biology (I said cell bio and neurotransmission), why I chose Manchester (I said about its reputation, how research-focused it is, plus the flexibility of the courses), what I'd like to do in the future, career-wise, and what societies and/or sports I might be interested in getting into at uni. I imagine there were other questions, too, but I can't remember them now. She then asked if I had any questions, so I asked about the current research at the uni, as well as how the courses worked in terms of transferring between years. I'd recommend coming up with a handful of questions to ask beforehand, though I think (but I'm not 100% sure) that she made me an offer before I asked her questions, so it might not be imperative.

    Having knowledge beyond A Level spec is really useful, I reckon that was my greatest asset, because I could talk at length about things that interested me. Of course, it did somewhat help that my interviewer was a specialist in related areas, but if you have a specific favourite bit of biology - particularly if you mentioned it in your personal statement - then definitely make sure you're reasonably well read up on it (just enough so you have some stuff to mention, even names to drop if you wanna look really good) so you can impress them with you're knowledge and dedication to researching the area, regardless of if it's their specialist area. But to be honest, they're not a huge deal, as most people they interview get an offer, so you're fairly safe. Just smile, be responsive and relaxed, and you'll be fine. It's more like a quick chat than a stuffy interview.

    I was predicted AAB, and was made an offer of AAA. They tend to make high offers, to encourage people to work hard at A Level, but it's not unheard of for people to get lower than their conditions and still get in. Happened to me.

    Good luck!
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Clem Fandango)
    I had an interview for Biology too, they're fairly straightforward. If I recall correctly (it was quite a while ago now) the day went something like this:

    Get there and register at Stopford building, then you're taken to a room to mingle for a bit until everyone is registered. There'll be student ambassadors who you can interrogate and I'd recommend asking them as much as you can, be about the department, accommodation, the city and so on.

    Then you have an introductory talk from the head of department and someone else whose position I can't remember at the moment. They'll give you an overview of the department, what it'll be like to study there, opportunities and all that stuff. After that, you'll be allocated a group (by the highly technical system of calling out people's names) and then the day varies after that. The main things to do are a tour of campus, the interview itself and a practical session. Different groups do things in different orders.

    You'll be shown around the Life Sciences department - eg Michael Smith building, Stopford building, the latter of which is where I had my interview (and presumably you'll have yours) - as well as other parts of the uni - University Place, the Main Library and so on. You'll be in a group with other candidates, normally about 4-5 I think, though I'm not sure as my group was just me and one other person (but that was unusually small). The groups are lead by a student ambassador or two, who are fountains of knowledge that, again, I recommend tapping into.

    The practical was about genetics and phenotypes of fruit flies and how fruit flies can be used as a model species. It's easy enough, but it's fun and the woman who was running it when I went was hilarious (and a bit nuts, too, but in a fun way).

    As for the interview, it's very relaxed and straightforward. Lasts about fifteen minutes, they'll ask you questions about your personal statement, your studies, your personality etc. They're not overly probing questions. I was asked if I thought I was at a disadvantage having not done chemistry A Level, which was probably the most difficult question. Most of it was spent discussing neurolinguistics, actually, because my interviewer was a neuroscientist and I'd put about doing an online course on neurolinguistics in my personal statement. Ended up talking about Noam Chomsky and Steven Pinker for a bit. We also briefly discussed the limitations of biological explanations for psychology (this was when she asked me about my psychology A Level) which got pretty philosophical for a fifteen minute interview. She asked about my EPQ briefly, as well as my favourite areas of biology (I said cell bio and neurotransmission), why I chose Manchester (I said about its reputation, how research-focused it is, plus the flexibility of the courses), what I'd like to do in the future, career-wise, and what societies and/or sports I might be interested in getting into at uni. I imagine there were other questions, too, but I can't remember them now. She then asked if I had any questions, so I asked about the current research at the uni, as well as how the courses worked in terms of transferring between years. I'd recommend coming up with a handful of questions to ask beforehand, though I think (but I'm not 100% sure) that she made me an offer before I asked her questions, so it might not be imperative.

    Having knowledge beyond A Level spec is really useful, I reckon that was my greatest asset, because I could talk at length about things that interested me. Of course, it did somewhat help that my interviewer was a specialist in related areas, but if you have a specific favourite bit of biology - particularly if you mentioned it in your personal statement - then definitely make sure you're reasonably well read up on it (just enough so you have some stuff to mention, even names to drop if you wanna look really good) so you can impress them with you're knowledge and dedication to researching the area, regardless of if it's their specialist area. But to be honest, they're not a huge deal, as most people they interview get an offer, so you're fairly safe. Just smile, be responsive and relaxed, and you'll be fine. It's more like a quick chat than a stuffy interview.

    I was predicted AAB, and was made an offer of AAA. They tend to make high offers, to encourage people to work hard at A Level, but it's not unheard of for people to get lower than their conditions and still get in. Happened to me.

    Good luck!
    Wow! You've made me feel so much better! Thank you! 😁


    Posted from TSR Mobile
 
 
 
Poll
Do you agree with the proposed ban on plastic straws and cotton buds?

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Write a reply...
Reply
Hide
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.