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Urgent request for help with english watch

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    in the sentence

    1.Germaine bree observed that proust's personages, like shakespeare's, resist all psychological reductions.

    2.i wince as i laugh, but i have to agree with roger that the comic mode is central to proust because it allows him representational distance in exploring the then forbidden matter of homosexuality.

    what do "psychological reductions" mean ( i am extremely puzzled at this phrease cuz there are some many meanings about the word reduction)

    does "i wince as i laugh" mean exaclty as "i wince while i laugh"?

    what does "representational distance" mean? what the word "representational" mean here?

    thanks for your help, sincerely.
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    why noboday reply? what have i done?
    please help i am really desperate
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    Don’t ponder too much over them.

    Especially "psychological reductions”, a sententious expression
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    A hint - if something is unclear it is good to discuss/"unpack" it. Often that is what they are looking for.
    edit: Psychological reductions is one of the crappest phrases I have ever heard - I expect it is meant to mean that both Proust and SHakespeare's characters have some sort of immune ego (hmmm...)
    I wince as I laugh - I'm assuming that it is something that is so spot-on that it is both comic and scathing at the same time?
    representational distance - I am assuming this means that Proust is giving himself immunity from what he is writing simply by writing. Or perhaps he is distanced from the true representation of homosexuality because of his social situation and is using writing as a form of exploring this?

    It seems as though they are both about the interplay between author and character: character as an author's tool. How does this work? DO the authors fail to properly represent them, do they fail in making them "real" by these pyschologial reductions?

    I would just explore the phrases and try and relate it back to solid evidence from the texts themselves.
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    (woo hoo, the first time I could help on something academic - it's usually just maths and chemistry questions *dead chuffed*)
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    (Original post by blissy)
    A hint - if something is unclear it is good to discuss/"unpack" it. Often that is what they are looking for.
    edit: Psychological reductions is one of the crappest phrases I have ever heard -.
    a compact summery. it's usually a good thing for the author to die before some introdcutions made by some backward critics.

    isn't proust the author of In search of time?
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    (Original post by *LoL*)
    a compact summery. it's usually a good thing for the author to die before some introdcutions made by some backward critics.

    isn't proust the author of In search of time?

    Um.... *has only read bits, and those were in French*
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    I would imagine the "psychological reduction" thing means that the can't be reduced to a simple thing. Taking Hamlet for example - you can't just dismiss him as having Oedipus complex, you can't say he was just a coward, or indecisive, or wholly pure. They are full of dichotomies and you can't represent them accurately with one phrase.

    I could be wrong of course.
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    But that would be SO cliched... everyone has said that. Point out the obvious, but go for something more original in everything
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    But (s)he asked what it meant!
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    (Original post by hitchhiker_13)
    But (s)he asked what it meant!
    I can never settle for that!

    *still has English head on*
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    (Original post by blissy)
    I can never settle for that!

    *still has English head on*

    Look at my signature - physics is my thing!
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    (Original post by blissy)
    A hint - if something is unclear it is good to discuss/"unpack" it. Often that is what they are looking for.
    edit: Psychological reductions is one of the crappest phrases I have ever heard - I expect it is meant to mean that both Proust and SHakespeare's characters have some sort of immune ego (hmmm...)
    I wince as I laugh - I'm assuming that it is something that is so spot-on that it is both comic and scathing at the same time?
    representational distance - I am assuming this means that Proust is giving himself immunity from what he is writing simply by writing. Or perhaps he is distanced from the true representation of homosexuality because of his social situation and is using writing as a form of exploring this?

    It seems as though they are both about the interplay between author and character: character as an author's tool. How does this work? DO the authors fail to properly represent them, do they fail in making them "real" by these pyschologial reductions?

    I would just explore the phrases and try and relate it back to solid evidence from the texts themselves.
    Thank you
 
 
 
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