Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free
x Turn on thread page Beta

Help.... Learned to drive in a diesel car and now got a petrol car watch

Announcements
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    I learned how to drive through the AA in there ford cars and used to setting off on the clutch its almost impossible on this smart 1ltr petrol i keep stalling it...

    I keep going out every night around the block at around 9-11 practising but i keep stalling it...

    Is it easier to bring the clutch up find a bite then apply gas? (I learnt the car would do this when trying to park slowly)

    or

    Putting a few revs of gas then bringing the clutch up but i can't seem to balance it and it just stalls.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    I also learnt with a diesel and found i had to give it more gas, also used gear 3 when doing 30Mph. With the petrol car i have now i dont have to give it much has when setting off and the engine runs smoother in gear 5 when doing 30Mph.

    I think i rev the gas then bring the clutch up.
    Offline

    13
    ReputationRep:
    Set the gas then sort the clutch out. Petrols don't have as much torque as diesels at the low end of the RPMs so they need more gas to set off, it also means that you shouldn't let the RPMs drop too much either.

    This video should help:

    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    I also did the same, I thought there was something wrong with my first car when i did this! It literally does all come down to practice. Now i can jump from Nearly any car or van UK or Euro.

    With petrol you need to accelerate a little bit before bringing the cluth 1,1/2 k then start bringing the clutch up slowly.
    Offline

    21
    ReputationRep:
    Vroom vroom

    beep beep
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    I've found you need to give petrol cars way more revs than diesel cars when bringing the clutch up. When I first bought my car I swear I spent more time stalling than I did actually driving.
    Offline

    5
    ReputationRep:
    pretty much any petrol car can be moved on just the clutch so the gas / clutch differences in reality don't make a blind bit of difference, especially on modern cars, by modern I mean those made in the past decade or so, where the ECU takes care of extra fuelling and the like if you don't use any gas, its simple physics. there may not be the torque there if you're on any kind of gradient, but on flat ground any car can be shifted around on the clutch.

    its simply inexperience that leads to stalling a petrol, because you're used to doing things a certain way, you'd likely keep stalling a new diesel car also, simply because its a new car and the clutches would be different, different biting points etc etc, even on 2 of the same model they would be different to control due to the amount of clutch wear etc

    but of course because the majority of cars on the road are petrols, most learners will go on to a petrol car initially, and hence the myth of a petrol car being unable to be moved on just the clutch is born though the newly passed rivers inexperience, and the 'stories' that have been passed on from learner to learner since the dawn of time, because this myth covers up their inadequacies, because surely they know how to drive now that they have passed their test.

    If you keep stalling, you're simply not used to the varying degrees of movement you need for your new car, your 'muscle memory' is reverting back to what you're used to, it really is that simple, you essentially have to relearn where the bites etc are, and learn what your new car does and doesn't like.

    an experienced driver can just jump in to any old car and move the thing, simply because they can tell where their feet need to be within seconds, and they can balance the clutch simply by drawing on their experience, its not rocket science.

    if all else fails just give it some gas, it'll cover up a multitude of clutch sins for the inexperienced driver.
    Offline

    13
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by kernow24)
    its simply inexperience that leads to stalling a petrol, because you're used to doing things a certain way, you'd likely keep stalling a new diesel car also,
    Keep telling yourself that... Having done the complete opposite of what the OP has done (taught in a petrol and then got a diesel) I can tell you it's more than just inexperience in most cases. You can certainly move some small petrols with just the clutch, but others do just flat out stall.


    In 25 hours I stalled my instructors car about 20 times. Even if I went by the last 5 hours, I'd probably be looking at about 2-3 stalls.

    In about 25 hours, I stalled my car 3 times (in the spoiler if you're interested).
    Spoiler:
    Show
    1- The floor mat got caught on the metal under the gas pedal and made it hard to push the gas in, ended up stalling coming out of a junction.
    2- Turning into my drive, took a much sharper turn and caught the car on the raised part of the kerb. Just didn't give it enough revs and didn't drop the clutch enough to stop it stalling.
    3- I'd tell you what happened, but even to this day, I have absolutely no idea what happened or why the car stalled.
 
 
 
Reply
Submit reply
Turn on thread page Beta
TSR Support Team

We have a brilliant team of more than 60 Support Team members looking after discussions on The Student Room, helping to make it a fun, safe and useful place to hang out.

This forum is supported by:
Updated: November 17, 2015
Poll
Do you agree with the proposed ban on plastic straws and cotton buds?

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Write a reply...
Reply
Hide
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.