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Think 25 Policy watch

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    I saw this happen and It made me wonder about how it can be tough for Cashiers sometimes because as annoying as the Think 25 rule is, they don't have a choice, if they suspect that someone might be underage, they will ask for ID....I'm 25 and I still get ID'd I don't mind because I know it's the law...no one is going to risk a £5000 fine and a criminal record just so a customer can get a drink, no one!

    A customer was being served in the supermarket and everything seemed fine on the wet and windy day and then, things seemed to take a bad turn as I heard the cashier ask the woman for ID and I heard her say this
    ''My ID is in the car, are you really going to make me go all the way out into the rain with my children to get my ID?!''

    The cashier said he was just doing his job so called over his supervisor to get a second opinion who naturally backed the cashier, so what happened next seemed quite bizarre, the woman in a strop took her trolley and left the store, only to return about a minute later with her shopping soaking wet! She demanded to see the supervisor as she refused to pay for her shopping as it was soaking wet!! eventually, I think it was the manager who came down to see what was happening and I think he was apologizing and explaining the store's policy to her and she was saying that it was disgusting how she had to go out into the rain and get her ID but from where I was standing, she did look quite young....a little bit over 18 but younger than 25 so I can see why the Cashier would have asked...because he's been told to when someone young comes to the till with alcohol

    Last thing I heard, the customer said she wasn't going to shop in the supermarket again and left and the cashier wasn't in any trouble, which he shouldn't be because he was just doing his job but it must have been a bad experience for him, he look disheartened after it and stressed...I know the rules are extreme for alcohol but it's not the cashier's fault for it!
    Why does everyone who gets refused take it out on cashiers?
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    (Original post by Mrx123)
    I saw this happen and It made me wonder about how it can be tough for Cashiers sometimes because as annoying as the Think 25 rule is, they don't have a choice, if they suspect that someone might be underage, they will ask for ID....I'm 25 and I still get ID'd I don't mind because I know it's the law...no one is going to risk a £5000 fine and a criminal record just so a customer can get a drink, no one!

    A customer was being served in the supermarket and everything seemed fine on the wet and windy day and then, things seemed to take a bad turn as I heard the cashier ask the woman for ID and I heard her say this
    ''My ID is in the car, are you really going to make me go all the way out into the rain with my children to get my ID?!''

    The cashier said he was just doing his job so called over his supervisor to get a second opinion who naturally backed the cashier, so what happened next seemed quite bizarre, the woman in a strop took her trolley and left the store, only to return about a minute later with her shopping soaking wet! She demanded to see the supervisor as she refused to pay for her shopping as it was soaking wet!! eventually, I think it was the manager who came down to see what was happening and I think he was apologizing and explaining the store's policy to her and she was saying that it was disgusting how she had to go out into the rain and get her ID but from where I was standing, she did look quite young....a little bit over 18 but younger than 25 so I can see why the Cashier would have asked...because he's been told to when someone young comes to the till with alcohol

    Last thing I heard, the customer said she wasn't going to shop in the supermarket again and left and the cashier wasn't in any trouble, which he shouldn't be because he was just doing his job but it must have been a bad experience for him, he look disheartened after it and stressed...I know the rules are extreme for alcohol but it's not the cashier's fault for it!
    Why does everyone who gets refused take it out on cashiers?
    Because they are on the front lines and are the "face" of the supermarket so to speak...either way the woman was in the wrong for acting the way she did. She could easily have just told the staff she left her ID in the car and ask if the cashier could mind her kids while she went off to get it. Heypresto no wet groceries or wet kids.

    Not to poke holes in your story though, but I find it unbelievable that the staff allowed her to walk out of the shop with her trolley full of groceries to get her ID from the car with her kids... would have been fun to see her get tackled by security though haha
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    (Original post by Random.guy)
    Because they are on the front lines and are the "face" of the supermarket so to speak...either way the woman was in the wrong for acting the way she did. She could easily have just told the staff she left her ID in the car and ask if the cashier could mind her kids while she went off to get it. Heypresto no wet groceries or wet kids.

    Not to poke holes in your story though, but I find it unbelievable that the staff allowed her to walk out of the shop with her trolley full of groceries to get her ID from the car with her kids... would have been fun to see her get tackled by security though haha
    No she was not in the wrong. She was obviously 18 and entitled to buy alcohol. Clearly the store is entitled to refuse to sell to anyone it pleases, but she does not have to be its customer. Frankly if I were her, I would have left the trolley at the cashiers walked out and driven to another supermarket, vowing never to return to that one.
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    (Original post by nulli tertius)
    No she was not in the wrong. She was obviously 18 and entitled to buy alcohol. Clearly the store is entitled to refuse to sell to anyone it pleases, but she does not have to be its customer. Frankly if I were her, I would have left the trolley at the cashiers walked out and driven to another supermarket, vowing never to return to that one.
    True but isn't Think 25 all about if the customer looks 25 or younger? they must have thought she looked young, asked her for ID and she didn't have it on her...it's not always so easy to tell if someone is over or under and I know you have to be legally 18 to purchase Alcohol but if you look under 25 then...
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    I know it's must have been annoying but I know that there's a chance I could be ID'd so I make sure I take my ID if I'm buying alcohol or ****. I have forgotten it on a few occasions and I'll try to see if I can get served anyway but if not I know it's my own fault for forgetting it so I don't get mad at the cashier doing his job. The consequences for them selling to someone underage is quite severe from what I've heard so I don't blame them for being cautious.
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    (Original post by Mrx123)
    True but isn't Think 25 all about if the customer looks 25 or younger? they must have thought she looked young, asked her for ID and she didn't have it on her...it's not always so easy to tell if someone is over or under and I know you have to be legally 18 to purchase Alcohol but if you look under 25 then...
    Think 25 is just something the store has invented.

    She was driving and had children. She may have looked 24 but how likely was it that she looked 17?
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    (Original post by Jenx301)
    I know it's must have been annoying but I know that there's a chance I could be ID'd so I make sure I take my ID if I'm buying alcohol or ****. I have forgotten it on a few occasions and I'll try to see if I can get served anyway but if not I know it's my own fault for forgetting it so I don't get mad at the cashier doing his job. The consequences for them selling to someone underage is quite severe from what I've heard so I don't blame them for being cautious.
    maximum of £5000 fine I think and a possible criminal record

    Plus I have heard it is drilled into them to check ID'S or pretty much their lives are over

    No wonder they get paranoid
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    (Original post by nulli tertius)
    Think 25 is just something the store has invented.

    She was driving and had children. She may have looked 24 but how likely was it that she looked 17?
    some places do Think 30 I hear
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    (Original post by nulli tertius)
    No she was not in the wrong. She was obviously 18 and entitled to buy alcohol. Clearly the store is entitled to refuse to sell to anyone it pleases, but she does not have to be its customer. Frankly if I were her, I would have left the trolley at the cashiers walked out and driven to another supermarket, vowing never to return to that one.
    She was in the wrong, there was no reason to throw a hissy fit when asked by someone doing their job for ID as it is a requirement by law that if the supermarkets break can have their licenses taken away from them. Additionally just because she has kids doesn't imply shes over 18 and obviously she was deemed young enough to be asked for ID or even if she was driving she could have been driving with a learner license with a qualified driver waiting in the car (unlikely but just one of many potential circumstances). Heck I've been asked for ID when buying lottery tickets in ASDA even though I had plenty of facial hair (not this "buff fluff" you see on teenagers)..also good luck trying to buy alcohol in supermarkets that don't ask for ID, just saying but only Selfridges and Harvey Nichols, Spirited Wines, and the long established shops around Soho (reference below) don't enforce this rule.

    I'm not trying to start an argument with you but to me her attitude was just awful and the cashier didn't deserve any of that abuse which was what my previous comment was implying.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Challenge_21
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    (Original post by Random.guy)
    She was in the wrong, there was no reason to throw a hissy fit when asked by someone doing their job for ID as it is a requirement by law that if the supermarkets break can have their licenses taken away from them. Additionally just because she has kids doesn't imply shes over 18 and obviously she was deemed young enough to be asked for ID or even if she was driving she could have been driving with a learner license with a qualified driver waiting in the car (unlikely but just one of many potential circumstances). Heck I've been asked for ID when buying lottery tickets in ASDA even though I had plenty of facial hair (not this "buff fluff" you see on teenagers)..also good luck trying to buy alcohol in supermarkets that don't ask for ID, just saying but only Selfridges and Harvey Nichols, Spirited Wines, and the long established shops around Soho (reference below) don't enforce this rule.

    I'm not trying to start an argument with you but to me her attitude was just awful and the cashier didn't deserve any of that abuse which was what my previous comment was implying.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Challenge_21
    I am sorry this is not a requirement of law (except in Scotland). The legal requirement is:


    3.—(1) The premises licence holder or club premises certificate holder must ensure that an age verification policy is adopted in respect of the premises in relation to the sale or supply of alcohol.

    (2) The designated premises supervisor in relation to the premises licence must ensure that the supply of alcohol at the premises is carried on in accordance with the age verification policy.

    (3) The policy must require individuals who appear to the responsible person to be under 18 years of age (or such older age as may be specified in the policy) to produce on request, before being served alcohol, identification bearing their photograph, date of birth and either—(a)a holographic mark, or(b)an ultraviolet feature. [my emphasis]
    The licence holder chooses to adopt a policy of applying an age greater than 18 and if he does so, then breach of that policy becomes a breach of the licence.

    I am old enough that I have never been asked for ID when buying alcohol.

    I was in a restaurant in Canada once when the restaurant staff ID'd two young women dining with their parents. I thought at the time that if anyone pulled that stunt with me in the UK I would make sure the restaurant owner had wished he had gone into another industry
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    (Original post by nulli tertius)
    I am sorry this is not a requirement of law (except in Scotland). The legal requirement is:




    The licence holder chooses to adopt a policy of applying an age greater than 18 and if he does so, then breach of that policy becomes a breach of the licence.

    I am old enough that I have never been asked for ID when buying alcohol.

    I was in a restaurant in Canada once when the restaurant staff ID'd two young women dining with their parents. I thought at the time that if anyone pulled that stunt with me in the UK I would make sure the restaurant owner had wished he had gone into another industry
    A friend of mine who is 59 was shopping in a supermarket with her son of 25 and his girlfriend, also 25. They had the trolley in front of her in the queue. He had no ID on him and was refused the alcohol. My friend then took it from him and said she would buy it. She was then refused as it was clear she was going to give it straight away to someone 'underage'. Unfortunately, boycotting the store isn't an option as it is the only one realistically accessible from the relatively remote place they live in.
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    (Original post by Carnationlilyrose)
    A friend of mine who is 59 was shopping in a supermarket with her son of 25 and his girlfriend, also 25. They had the trolley in front of her in the queue. He had no ID on him and was refused the alcohol. My friend then took it from him and said she would buy it. She was then refused as it was clear she was going to give it straight away to someone 'underage'. Unfortunately, boycotting the store isn't an option as it is the only one realistically accessible from the relatively remote place they live in.
    One of the benefits of being a lawyer is that one can construct an argument out of very thin fare.

    An untrue verbal allegation of criminality is slander. However slander except in limited circumstances is not not actionable without proof of financial loss. One of the limited circumstances in which slander is actionable without proof of financial loss if it is in relative to their profession or calling. Accusing a lawyer of criminality, given our professional conduct rules would fall within that exception.

    A member of the public can seek a review of a premises licence on certain grounds.. Those grounds would not naturally cover this situation but one could get them there. One angle might be age discrimination. That discrimination would almost certainly be justifiable in the case of a challenge 21 policy because of the numbers of under age people who could pass for 18, 19 and 20. A challenge 25 would be much harder to justify because one has to demonstrate that the policy is necessary to prevent 15, 16 and 17 years olds buying alcohol.

    As I say, one could give a licence holder a very hard time if one was angry enough.
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    (Original post by nulli tertius)
    One of the benefits of being a lawyer is that one can construct an argument out of very thin fare.

    An untrue verbal allegation of criminality is slander. However slander except in limited circumstances is not not actionable without proof of financial loss. One of the limited circumstances in which slander is actionable without proof of financial loss if it is in relative to their profession or calling. Accusing a lawyer of criminality, given our professional conduct rules would fall within that exception.

    A member of the public can seek a review of a premises licence on certain grounds.. Those grounds would not naturally cover this situation but one could get them there. One angle might be age discrimination. That discrimination would almost certainly be justifiable in the case of a challenge 21 policy because of the numbers of under age people who could pass for 18, 19 and 20. A challenge 25 would be much harder to justify because one has to demonstrate that the policy is necessary to prevent 15, 16 and 17 years olds buying alcohol.

    As I say, one could give a licence holder a very hard time if one was angry enough.
    I wish you had been there. Perhaps a pro bono case?
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    (Original post by Jenx301)
    The consequences for them selling to someone underage is quite severe from what I've heard so I don't blame them for being cautious.
    There's a notice up in Sainsburys saying that they (cashier) can be fined up to £5000 for selling to someone underage.

    I always get IDd for alcohol, apart from once. I know it's going to happen; so take ID with me if I'm going to buy alcohol.
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    If all the privileged, argumentative ********s of the world could get together an decide on a supermarket to stop shopping in the I'd definitely do all my shopping there
 
 
 
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