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    Hi - I'm in year 11 and doing my French GCSE at the moment! I love it and I want to carry it on to A-Level, but I was wondering how difficult it is? I could really do with some advice on what it's like 😂🇫🇷


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    (Original post by Allymcdermott)
    Hi - I'm in year 11 and doing my French GCSE at the moment! I love it and I want to carry it on to A-Level, but I was wondering how difficult it is? I could really do with some advice on what it's like 😂🇫🇷


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    If you're good at French it's fine. Most A level French students will tell you it's ridiculously difficult - that's because they're ****. More is expected of you at A level and by the end of even the first year your level of French will be much more advanced, primarily because you are actually encouraged to speak in every lesson, but also because you cover more complex topics in your specification.

    If you enjoy it then definitely take it. If you don't feel like your French is top band for GCSE or that you could push yourself day in day out to improve then don't take it. A language A level is a massive commitment, there's a lot of work to do - an unlimited amount really. BUT you reap what you sow. The ability to speak a modern foreign language to A level standard is not only desirable to employers, but also personally rewarding.

    I hope that helps. Reply again if not. Good luck with your GCSEs!
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    Language A-levels are really hard - the jump from GCSE to A-level is huge. Depending on your course, there will be elements of history, literature and/or translation - you will also have to write and speak french spontaneously. However, if you love languages and are prepared to put in the effort required, you'll learn so much and, in my opinion, it's one of the most rewarding subjects. By the end of year 13 you should be able to hold a conversation with a native speaker about things like immigration and environmental issues, read french newspaper, appreciate french music. Although it's not easy, you should be able to keep up with it and it's more than worth it.
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    (Original post by beyknowles2)
    If you're good at French it's fine. Most A level French students will tell you it's ridiculously difficult - that's because they're ****. More is expected of you at A level and by the end of even the first year your level of French will be much more advanced, primarily because you are actually encouraged to speak in every lesson, but also because you cover more complex topics in your specification.

    If you enjoy it then definitely take it. If you don't feel like your French is top band for GCSE or that you could push yourself day in day out to improve then don't take it. A language A level is a massive commitment, there's a lot of work to do - an unlimited amount really. BUT you reap what you sow. The ability to speak a modern foreign language to A level standard is not only desirable to employers, but also personally rewarding.

    I hope that helps. Reply again if not. Good luck with your GCSEs!
    (Original post by nverjvlev)
    Language A-levels are really hard - the jump from GCSE to A-level is huge. Depending on your course, there will be elements of history, literature and/or translation - you will also have to write and speak french spontaneously. However, if you love languages and are prepared to put in the effort required, you'll learn so much and, in my opinion, it's one of the most rewarding subjects. By the end of year 13 you should be able to hold a conversation with a native speaker about things like immigration and environmental issues, read french newspaper, appreciate french music. Although it's not easy, you should be able to keep up with it and it's more than worth it.
    Do you know if there'd be any point in continuing to study a Modern Foreign Language in Uni, just to prove that I can speak the language (German in my case) to potential employers? Or will the language A level be enough to show communication skills?
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    (Original post by nverjvlev)
    Language A-levels are really hard - the jump from GCSE to A-level is huge. Depending on your course, there will be elements of history, literature and/or translation - you will also have to write and speak french spontaneously. However, if you love languages and are prepared to put in the effort required, you'll learn so much and, in my opinion, it's one of the most rewarding subjects. By the end of year 13 you should be able to hold a conversation with a native speaker about things like immigration and environmental issues, read french newspaper, appreciate french music. Although it's not easy, you should be able to keep up with it and it's more than worth it.
    Would you advice someone who didn't take it at GCSE to take french A-level? Also may I ask which board you did it from?
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    (Original post by hilrho)
    Would you advice someone who didn't take it at GCSE to take french A-level? Also may I ask which board you did it from?
    I honestly can't remember which exam board I did for GCSE but I'm doing AQA atm. It depends on how good your French is - you are expected to have a very fluent and broad knowledge of verb tenses and grammar. Do you mean starting from scratch?
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    Hey, I think it really depends.
    I took French International GCSE and got an A. I then decided to take it for As/A Level and it was alright. However, I found that although I did have some passion for the subject, it wasn't enough and I didn't enjoy it as much as my other subjects (history, critical thinking, drama and english lit) so, i eventually decided to drop it. I think that if you have a strong passion for languages and did well in GCSE then you would be fine, it just wasnt for me.
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    (Original post by nverjvlev)
    I honestly can't remember which exam board I did for GCSE but I'm doing AQA atm. It depends on how good your French is - you are expected to have a very fluent and broad knowledge of verb tenses and grammar. Do you mean starting from scratch?
    Well I did French until the 9th grade but that was 3 years ago! Going by what your saying it looks as though I need to be quiet fluent already in it which I'm not so I suppose I can't take the subject at A-level. Besides I was going to have to do it through the CIE curriculum which is not helpful at all - they don't make any of their resources public!

    Besides is it a very broad subject? Because if I do decide to take it on it will be a 5th A-level.
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    (Original post by hilrho)
    Well I did French until the 9th grade but that was 3 years ago! Going by what your saying it looks as though I need to be quiet fluent already in it which I'm not so I suppose I can't take the subject at A-level. Besides I was going to have to do it through the CIE curriculum which is not helpful at all - they don't make any of their resources public!

    Besides is it a very broad subject? Because if I do decide to take it on it will be a 5th A-level.
    You can't take a language A level without the GCSE in it at a grade A-C depending on the college or sixth form. Plus I'm pretty sure you can't take 5 A levels anyway (with the reformed A levels). And there's no point even if it is possible.
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    (Original post by beyknowles2)
    You can't take a language A level without the GCSE in it at a grade A-C depending on the college or sixth form. Plus I'm pretty sure you can't take 5 A levels anyway (with the reformed A levels). And there's no point even if it is possible.
    What makes you say there's no point?

    Oh I'm an international student so the new curriculum doesn't affect me, and I'm home schooled as well so I could basically take on any subjects as long as I can handle it Although I agree with you - it seems as though it would be a better idea not to take french due to lack of prior knowledge.
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    (Original post by BlueBlueBells)
    Do you know if there'd be any point in continuing to study a Modern Foreign Language in Uni, just to prove that I can speak the language (German in my case) to potential employers? Or will the language A level be enough to show communication skills?
    Who do you mean by 'potential employers'? If you plan on working in the business industry, for example, then no, don't do a German course at university. Maybe do Business (Management) with German if that course is offered. If you're (near-) fluent in German you can write this on your CV so it isn't necessary to complete a three year German degree to "prove" your competence in the language.
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    (Original post by hilrho)
    What makes you say there's no point?

    Oh I'm an international student so the new curriculum doesn't affect me, and I'm home schooled as well so I could basically take on any subjects as long as I can handle it Although I agree with you - it seems as though it would be a better idea not to take french due to lack of prior knowledge.
    Oh okay, would you really be able to get your French up to A level standard being home schooled?

    And because the most part of people who study A levels go on to apply to university, and universities only give out offers based on three A levels, so in terms of educational progress you're not doing yourself any favors by studying 2 extra A levels, if anything that would just hinder your progress being as your French is very basic so that subject would require ridiculous amounts of travail.
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    (Original post by hilrho)
    What makes you say there's no point?

    Oh I'm an international student so the new curriculum doesn't affect me, and I'm home schooled as well so I could basically take on any subjects as long as I can handle it Although I agree with you - it seems as though it would be a better idea not to take french due to lack of prior knowledge.
    The problem with trying to do French outside of a school is that you won't get a chance to talk in French to other people much - this is key to learning to speak spontaneously. If you really want to do well at this I suggest you listen to the french news (you can do this online) at least once a week and find someone who speaks very good french to talk about your topics to for at least an hour a week in total. You could do this on skype or you could contact a high school near you and make friends with a year 13 student? The AS topics are quite similar to GCSE -music, celebrity culture, holidays, health etc, the A2 topics are a little different - nuclear energy, restorative justice, immigration, history, literature etc.
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    Would French be a good idea if I got a B at GCSE? Or would I find it too difficult? 💭


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    (Original post by Allymcdermott)
    Hi - I'm in year 11 and doing my French GCSE at the moment! I love it and I want to carry it on to A-Level, but I was wondering how difficult it is? I could really do with some advice on what it's like 😂🇫🇷


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    This might be really controversial, but if you don't get an A* in French - don't take it as an A-level.
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    (Original post by Allymcdermott)
    Would French be a good idea if I got a B at GCSE? Or would I find it too difficult? 💭


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    No, it would be an awful idea IMO.
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    (Original post by beyknowles2)
    Who do you mean by 'potential employers'? If you plan on working in the business industry, for example, then no, don't do a German course at university. Maybe do Business (Management) with German if that course is offered. If you're (near-) fluent in German you can write this on your CV so it isn't necessary to complete a three year German degree to "prove" your competence in the language.
    Thank you for the advice! Well, I'm thinking of going into Engineering of some kind (possibly Maths), and I'd really like to have some kind of qualification. I was wondering if one of the 'Goethe Institut' examinations would work?
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    (Original post by jamestg)
    No, it would be an awful idea IMO.
    Would it? Oh 😂
    Well thanks anyway


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    (Original post by Allymcdermott)
    Would it? Oh 😂
    Well thanks anyway


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    Have you thought about any other subjects perhaps?
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    (Original post by BlueBlueBells)
    Thank you for the advice! Well, I'm thinking of going into Engineering of some kind (possibly Maths), and I'd really like to have some kind of qualification. I was wondering if one of the 'Goethe Institut' examinations would work?
    Not sure what that is, but honestly it isn't necessary. If an employer is interested in your being able to speak German, they won't see that you stopped at A level and immediately think Hm, can they really speak German though? I want further proof. Including it on your job application is sufficient !

    Nonetheless, if you do have the burning desire to obtain such a qualification as further proof then by all means go for it if you're capable. It won't make you any less suitable for a job after all !
 
 
 
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