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Exactly how competitive is GEM? watch

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    Since starting a degree I've since decided I definatly want to be a doctor but the only option open to me as it stands is Graduate Entry so I was wondering how competitive it is compared to other subjects
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    Very - some GEPs only have 30 places and >1000 applicants.

    Still, it's also perfectly doable if you apply strategically and play to your strengths e.g. boss the UKCAT and only apply to UKCAT heavy med schools. Once you get to the interview stage, the odds can become much more weighted in your favour.
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    The other big entrance exam for graduate medicine courses is GAMSAT - it's difficult and takes a lot of preparation (although is undoubtedly easier for science graduates) but the courses that require it tend to have fewer applicants compared to UKCAT, so your chances are better. You can back this up by researching applicant to place ratios as these vary quite a lot between different courses. That said, there may still be around 10-20 applicants per place, so it's still competitive.
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    (Original post by kantayya)
    The other big entrance exam for graduate medicine courses is GAMSAT - it's difficult and takes a lot of preparation (although is undoubtedly easier for science graduates) but the courses that require it tend to have fewer applicants compared to UKCAT, so your chances are better. You can back this up by researching applicant to place ratios as these vary quite a lot between different courses. That said, there may still be around 10-20 applicants per place, so it's still competitive.
    That's good because I will be graduating in Med Chem. I'll probably take and prepare for all 3 entrance exams (BMAT, UKCAT and GAMSAT)

    Thanks for the great advice
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    (Original post by AngryRedhead)
    That's good because I will be graduating in Med Chem. I'll probably take and prepare for all 3 entrance exams (BMAT, UKCAT and GAMSAT)

    Thanks for the great advice
    One point to bear in mind is that preparing for the entrance exams can be quite stressful. Given you can only put down up to four choices on UCAS, I would suggest thinking about whether you might want to only do, say, two of the exams, to give yourself more time to prepare for each.

    I did UKCAT and GAMSAT, which are quite different in terms of preparation - it may be that BMAT is not so different so it's more like piggy-backing off GAMSAT, but it's worth thinking about, otherwise you might be investing massively in one exam just for the sake of one course option.

    There are some courses where they don't require any of the exams, such as Birmingham, so it's worth thinking about these options too and how they affect the overall plan.
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    (Original post by kantayya)
    One point to bear in mind is that preparing for the entrance exams can be quite stressful. Given you can only put down up to four choices on UCAS, I would suggest thinking about whether you might want to only do, say, two of the exams, to give yourself more time to prepare for each.

    I did UKCAT and GAMSAT, which are quite different in terms of preparation - it may be that BMAT is not so different so it's more like piggy-backing off GAMSAT, but it's worth thinking about, otherwise you might be investing massively in one exam just for the sake of one course option.

    There are some courses where they don't require any of the exams, such as Birmingham, so it's worth thinking about these options too and how they affect the overall plan.
    I'd probably steer clear of Birmingham for precisely the reason that if it doesn't have an entrance exam, everyone and their pet dog will have applied there and there will be ridiculous competition.

    Thank you for the advice though
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    (Original post by AngryRedhead)
    That's good because I will be graduating in Med Chem. I'll probably take and prepare for all 3 entrance exams (BMAT, UKCAT and GAMSAT)

    Thanks for the great advice
    Doing all three would be soul-destroying. I did the UKCAT and GAMSAT, and that was enough entrance exams for a lifetime.
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    (Original post by liam__)
    Doing all three would be soul-destroying. I did the UKCAT and GAMSAT, and that was enough entrance exams for a lifetime.
    Are you a med student now? Like, how hard are they?
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    (Original post by AngryRedhead)
    Are you a med student now? Like, how hard are they?
    Haven't done the GAMSAT but the UKCAT is the biggest pile of bull**** I've ever had the misfortune of being subjected to -- and for two consecutive hours, no less.
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    (Original post by Hydeman)
    Haven't done the GAMSAT but the UKCAT is the biggest pile of bull**** I've ever had the misfortune of being subjected to -- and for two consecutive hours, no less.
    Which med school you at? (If you are a med student)
    Thanks though, for that matter I remember doing a bit of it at Sixth Form, as one of those taster things. I'll probably brush up on my AS Level physics and maths before going in for it
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    (Original post by AngryRedhead)
    Which med school you at? (If you are a med student)
    Thanks though, for that matter I remember doing a bit of it at Sixth Form, as one of those taster things. I'll probably brush up on my AS Level physics and maths before going in for it
    I'm not a medical student (yet). I've applied to two UKCAT-requiring medical schools for 2016 entry, however, and accordingly sat the UKCAT in September.

    You're thinking of the BMAT. The UKCAT doesn't require any maths or physics knowledge beyond simple numeracy in the quantitative reasoning (QR) section. :lol: The maths you get in QR is unlikely to be AS standard anyway -- it's basically just knowing how to use decimals, fractions, percentages, conversions etc. You do get an on-screen calculator but it's so clumsy that you'd actually save time if you did the calculations in your head or on the silly little whiteboards they give you during the test.
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    (Original post by AngryRedhead)
    Are you a med student now? Like, how hard are they?
    I'm applying this cycle.

    They're both hard and require preparation. I spent three weeks full time (9am-5pm) revising for the UKCAT, and when the exam came around I'd exhausted all of the resources I had. I think two or three weeks is enough to get a good score.

    The GAMSAT is not necessarily a harder exam, it's just harder to prepare for.

    Your Med Chem degree will stand you in good stead for the science section. You will find all of the chemistry content in the exam basic (lots of basic concepts such as Gibbs free energy, chirality etc. are tested). Don't bother revising biology, most of the bio questions are veiled reasoning questions which require no prior knowledge. (If you really want to revise some bio, photosynthesis and aerobic respiration are good topics to know thoroughly). There's a small amount of physics; basic GCSE stuff like kinematics, electric circuits etc.

    Do lots of practice questions for section 1 (your preparation for the VR UKCAT section will come in handy here) and write lots of timed practice essays for section 2 (lots of people lose out every year on easy marks because they don't practice this enough).

    I prepared on and off for about a year, as I had to teach myself all of the science content (my degree is Comp Sci), and studied full time for the month leading up to the exam. I only wanted to take this exam once, so I put all of my effort into doing well the first time. I guess we'll see in the next few days (when the results are released) whether my advice is worth anything!
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    (Original post by Hydeman)
    I'm not a medical student (yet). I've applied to two UKCAT-requiring medical schools for 2016 entry, however, and accordingly sat the UKCAT in September.

    You're thinking of the BMAT. The UKCAT doesn't require any maths or physics knowledge beyond simple numeracy in the quantitative reasoning (QR) section. :lol: The maths you get in QR is unlikely to be AS standard anyway -- it's basically just knowing how to use decimals, fractions, percentages, conversions etc. You do get an on-screen calculator but it's so clumsy that you'd actually save time if you did the calculations in your head or on the silly little whiteboards they give you during the test.
    It probably was the BMAT then. It was time ago so you'll have to excuse me. That's good, the UKCAT certainly sounds like it is the easiest of all three of them to prepare for. Thank you for all this, btw. What resources would you recommend to prepare for UKCAT?
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    (Original post by liam__)
    I'm applying this cycle.

    They're both hard and require preparation. I spent three weeks full time (9am-5pm) revising for the UKCAT, and when the exam came around I'd exhausted all of the resources I had. I think two or three weeks is enough to get a good score.

    The GAMSAT is not necessarily a harder exam, it's just harder to prepare for.

    Your Med Chem degree will stand you in good stead for the science section. You will find all of the chemistry content in the exam basic (lots of basic concepts such as Gibbs free energy, chirality etc. are tested). Don't bother revising biology, most of the bio questions are veiled reasoning questions which require no prior knowledge. (If you really want to revise some bio, photosynthesis and aerobic respiration are good topics to know thoroughly). There's a small amount of physics; basic GCSE stuff like kinematics, electric circuits etc.

    Do lots of practice questions for section 1 (your preparation for the VR UKCAT section will come in handy here) and write lots of timed practice essays for section 2 (lots of people lose out every year on easy marks because they don't practice this enough).

    I prepared on and off for about a year, as I had to teach myself all of the science content (my degree is Comp Sci), and studied full time for the month leading up to the exam. I only wanted to take this exam once, so I put all of my effort into doing well the first time. I guess we'll see in the next few days (when the results are released) whether my advice is worth anything!
    Thank you but how much maths is involved? What learning and revision resources would you recommend?
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    (Original post by AngryRedhead)
    Thank you but how much maths is involved? What learning and revision resources would you recommend?
    UKCAT has a Quantitative Reasoning section, GAMSAT has less maths- just know your log rules whatever you do!

    UKCAT
    - medify
    - official mocks
    - others used Kaplan and did well though I can't vouch for them personally

    GAMSAT
    - Griffiths guide
    - A Level revision guides
    - Khan academy
    - Official mock papers
    - MCAT resources
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    (Original post by AngryRedhead)
    It probably was the BMAT then. It was time ago so you'll have to excuse me. That's good, the UKCAT certainly sounds like it is the easiest of all three of them to prepare for. Thank you for all this, btw. What resources would you recommend to prepare for UKCAT?
    Don't make that mistake for starters. :lol: It's an absolute ***** to prepare for because of the time constraints. There's a book that's a few years old by a company called ISC Medical which you can get on Amazon. Just search for '600 questions UKCAT book' and it should come up. It's highly recommended by a lot of people but it's probably a little out of date now and doesn't prepare you for the SJT section because that was added to the test quite recently.

    There are a number of companies that offer preparation, such as Medify and Kaplan. I can't speak for Kaplan but I used Medify and, personally, I found that a lot of the questions in its question bank are not representative of the real thing, and in a bad way too. What I mean is that a lot of the decision analysis and abstract reasoning questions that you get on Medify will be easier than the ones in the actual test. This is just my impression of it and there may well be people who benefitted from it but I certainly won't be using them again. To balance the tone of this review, I should mention that they gave me free explanations for sections 1 and 2 of the BMAT past papers from 2009 to 2013 so it wasn't a complete waste.

    I would say, based on my experience with both the BMAT and UKCAT, that the BMAT is the best to prepare for, provided you start early. It's a lot more logical and the only thing that ruins it is the time pressure, but it's actually possible to prepare for the BMAT, although section 1 problem solving questions are quite difficult to predict and complete in the time limit for some people such as myself.
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    (Original post by liam__)
    UKCAT has a Quantitative Reasoning section, GAMSAT has less maths- just know your log rules whatever you do!
    You mean natural logs or the -log (h+)/ 10-pH?
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    (Original post by AngryRedhead)
    You mean natural logs or the -log (h+)/ 10-pH?
    Obviously there's loads of logs in chemistry (pH, pKa etc), but natural logs came up in one of the mock papers also iirc.
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    (Original post by liam__)
    Obviously there's loads of logs in chemistry (pH, pKa etc), but natural logs came up in one of the mock papers also iirc.
    Okay, thanks for the heads up
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    (Original post by Hydeman)
    Don't make that mistake for starters. :lol: It's an absolute ***** to prepare for because of the time constraints. There's a book that's a few years old by a company called ISC Medical which you can get on Amazon. Just search for '600 questions UKCAT book' and it should come up. It's highly recommended by a lot of people but it's probably a little out of date now and doesn't prepare you for the SJT section because that was added to the test quite recently.

    There are a number of companies that offer preparation, such as Medify and Kaplan. I can't speak for Kaplan but I used Medify and, personally, I found that a lot of the questions in its question bank are not representative of the real thing, and in a bad way too. What I mean is that a lot of the decision analysis and abstract reasoning questions that you get on Medify will be easier than the ones in the actual test. This is just my impression of it and there may well be people who benefitted from it but I certainly won't be using them again. To balance the tone of this review, I should mention that they gave me free explanations for sections 1 and 2 of the BMAT past papers from 2009 to 2013 so it wasn't a complete waste.

    I would say, based on my experience with both the BMAT and UKCAT, that the BMAT is the best to prepare for, provided you start early. It's a lot more logical and the only thing that ruins it is the time pressure, but it's actually possible to prepare for the BMAT, although section 1 problem solving questions are quite difficult to predict and complete in the time limit for some people such as myself.
    Wow, you are being really helpful! Thank you again I will steer clear of Medify and check out Kaplan.
 
 
 
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